Ninth International Conference on Mars

July 22-25, 2019

Pasadena, California

 

Program and Abstracts

 

Monday, July 22, 2019

8:30 a.m.

Beckman Auditorium

Welcome to Ninth Mars

8:50 a.m.

Beckman Auditorium

Plenary:  What We Learn by Studying Mars

10:30 a.m.

Beckman Institute Patio

Poster Session:  Atmospheric Drivers (Except Dust) and Climate Cycles

10:30 a.m.

Beckman Institute Patio

Poster Session:  Dust — Storms, Grains, Impact on Environment

10:30 a.m.

Beckman Auditorium Patio

Poster Session:  Surface Activity I — Water, Frost, Wind, Impact, and/or Gravity-Driven?

10:30 a.m.

Beckman Auditorium Patio

Poster Session:  Interior of Mars, Including as Seen by InSight

10:30 a.m.

Beckman Mall Tent

Poster Session:  Missions — Past, Ongoing, Upcoming

1:30 p.m.

Beckman Auditorium

Is Dust Controlling the Martian Atmosphere?

1:30 p.m.

Ramo Auditorium

Biosignatures on Mars

4:00 p.m.

Beckman Auditorium

Views from Above and Below:  Expanding Our Knowledge of Past Mars Environment

4:00 p.m.

Ramo Auditorium

Beyond Dust:  What’s New When Observing the Weather?

 

Tuesday, July 23, 2019

8:30 a.m.

Beckman Auditorium

Habitability of Modern and Ancient Mars

9:30 a.m.

Beckman Auditorium

Habitability of Modern and Ancient Mars Panel

8:30 a.m.

Ramo Auditorium

Volatiles and Atmospheric Evolution

10:30 a.m.

Beckman Institute Patio

Poster Session:  Geology and Geochemistry of Gale

10:30 a.m.

Beckman Institute Patio

Poster Session:  Signs of Past Water Flow – Over Land and in the Ground

10:30 a.m.

Beckman Auditorium Patio

Poster Session:  Ancient Climate

10:30 a.m.

Beckman Auditorium Patio

Poster Session:  Habitability and Biosignatures

10:30 a.m.

Beckman Mall Tent

Poster Session:  Ice and Frost

10:30 a.m.

Beckman Mall Tent

Poster Session:  Igneous Studies In Situ and with Meteorites

1:30 p.m.

Beckman Auditorium

Atmospheric Dynamics and Climate Cycles

1:30 p.m.

Ramo Auditorium

Mars on Earth:  Using Terrestrial Analogs to Understand Martian Crustal Processes

4:00 p.m.

Beckman Auditorium

Interior and Deep Crust Through Time

4:00 p.m.

Ramo Auditorium

Ancient Glaciers, Oceans, Rivers, and Lakes

 

Wednesday, July 24, 2019

8:30 a.m.

Beckman Auditorium

Present-Day Surface Activity — Due to Winds, Volatiles, Impacts

8:30 a.m.

Ramo Auditorium

Ancient Climate:  Evidence from Models and the Rock Record

10:30 a.m.

Beckman Institute Patio

Poster Session:  Volatile Cycles and Effects — Past and Present

10:30 a.m.

Beckman Institute Patio

Poster Session:  Signs of Other Past Water Accumulations — Oceans, Lakes, Hydrothermal, Snow

10:30 a.m.

Beckman Auditorium Patio

Poster Session:  Surface Activity II — Water, Frost, Wind, Impact, and/or Gravity Driven?

10:30 a.m.

Beckman Auditorium Patio

Poster Session:  More Geology and Geochemistry Around Mars

10:30 a.m.

Beckman Mall Tent

Poster Session:  Atmosphere Escape, Magnetic Fields, and Solar Influences

10:30 a.m.

Beckman Mall Tent

Poster Session:  Upper Atmosphere — Thermosphere/Ionosphere and Up

1:30 p.m.

Beckman Auditorium

Plenary:  Current Status of Planning for a Potential Mars Sample Return (MSR) Campaign Panel

2:40 p.m.

Beckman Auditorium

Plenary:  Mars Water Ice: A Synergistic Investigation for Science and Human Exploration

3:00 p.m.

Beckman Auditorium

Plenary:  Data Needed to Get Humans to Mars and Keep Them Alive Panel

4:00 p.m.

Beckman Auditorium

Past Aqueous Settings and Future Landing Sites

4:00 p.m.

Ramo Auditorium

The Air Up There:  How Does Energy Move Through the Upper Atmosphere?

 

Thursday, July 25, 2019

8:30 a.m.

Beckman Institute Patio

Poster Session:  Data and Analysis Tools — Databases, Models, Automation

8:30 a.m.

Beckman Auditorium Patio

Poster Session:  Martian Moons

8:30 a.m.

Beckman Auditorium Patio

Poster Session:  Mars Sample Return

8:30 a.m.

Beckman Auditorium Patio

Poster Session:  Outreach and Education

8:30 a.m.

Beckman Mall Tent

Poster Session:  Instrument Concepts

8:30 a.m.

Beckman Mall Tent

Poster Session:  Future Mission Concepts and Technologies

8:30 a.m.

Beckman Mall Tent

Poster Session:  Human Exploration — Landing Sites, Technology/Resources, and Terraforming

10:00 a.m.

Beckman Auditorium

Plenary:  Additional Key Advancements in Our Understanding of Mars

1:30 p.m.

Beckman Auditorium

Plenary:  Engineering Panel

2:30 p.m.

Beckman Auditorium

Ninth Mars Integration Reports Panel

4:00 p.m.

Beckman Auditorium

Wrap-Up and Thank You!

 

Print Only

 

 

Print Only

 

 

Monday, July 22, 2019

WELCOME TO NINTH MARS

8:30 a.m.   Beckman Auditorium

BACK TO TOP

Times

Presenter

Presentation

8:30 a.m.

Diniega S. *

Welcome and Overview

 

Monday, July 22, 2019

PLENARY:  WHAT WE LEARN BY STUDYING MARS

8:50 a.m.   Beckman Auditorium

Chairs:  Bethany Ehlmann and Robin Wordsworth

BACK TO TOP

Times

Authors (*Denotes Presenter)

Abstract Title and Summary

8:50 a.m.

Jakosky B. M. *

[INVITED] Mars Volatiles, Climate, and Habitability:  History and Inventory of CO2 and H2O

 

   Expanded from

 

The CO2 Inventory on Mars [#6030]
Spacecraft observations constrain the amounts of CO2 sequestered into the surface, subsurface, and polar regions, and lost to space. These sinks account for up to several bars of CO2, enough to have produced significant early greenhouse warming.

9:15 a.m.

Calvin W. M. *

[INVITED] The Orbital Perspective:  How Our World View has Changed 

 

   Expanded from

 

50 Years of Discoveries in Martian Surface Composition from Spacecraft Infrared Spectroscopy [#6116]
This history focuses on what were the game changing observations and discoveries made from infrared spectrometers and how they paved the way for the next steps in our current understanding of martian surface composition.

9:40 a.m.

Avridson R. E. *

[INVITED] Habitability of Mars as Inferred from Landed Mission Observations

10:05 a.m.

Johnson S. S. *   Graham H.   Anslyn E.   Brinckerhoff W.   Conrad P.   Cronin L.   Ellington A.   Elsila J.   Girguis P.   Grubisic A.   House C.   Kempes C.   Li X.   Libby E.   Mahaffy P.   Nadeau J.   Roussel A.   Sherwood Lollar B.   Steele A.

[INVITED] Future Approaches to Life Detection on Mars

 

   Expanded from

 

Agnostic Approaches to Life Detection on Mars [#6374]
Without presupposing any particular molecular framework, “agnostic biosignatures” could be used to search for life on Mars.

 

Monday, July 22, 2019

POSTER SESSION:  ATMOSPHERIC DRIVERS (EXCEPT DUST) AND CLIMATE CYCLES

10:30 a.m.   Beckman Institute Patio

BACK TO TOP

Authors

Abstract Title and Summary

Noguchi K.   Ueda M.   Hayashi H.

Zonal Correlation Among Dust, Water Ice Clouds and Temperature in the Martian Atmosphere Observed by MRO-MCS [#6135]
Aiming at revealing the effect of dust and water ice clouds on the temperature field in the martian atmosphere, we studied the zonal correlation among dust opacity, water ice cloud opacity and air temperature observed by MRO-MCS.

Guzewich S. D.   Smith M. D.

Seasonal Variation in Martian Water Ice Cloud Particle Size [#6178]
CRISM limb-viewing retrievals show that martian water ice cloud particle sizes exhibit a strong seasonal cycle in both the tropics and north polar atmosphere.

Alshehhi K.   Alzahmi B.   Abuelgasim A.

Visual Analysis of Spatiotemporal Variations of Mars ice Clouds Using MARCI Data [#6023]
We perform visual analysis of the spatial and temporal locations of Mars ice clouds using MARCI data.

Slipski M.   Jakosky B. M.

Turbopause Altitudes and Mesospheric Cloud Formation:  Effects of Wave Propagation and Dissipation in the Middle-Upper Atmosphere [#6313]
Wave activity in the middle and upper atmosphere influences the turbopause level (the transition from the well-mixed lower atmosphere to the diffusive upper atmosphere) and the formation of mesospheric clouds.

Hinson D. P.   Wang H.   Wilson R. J.   Spiga A.   Kahre M. A.   Hollingsworth J. L.

Transient Eddies, Water Ice Clouds, and Nocturnal Mixed Layers at High Northern Latitudes in Early Summer [#6032]
We are using observations from Mars Global Surveyor and simulations by two numerical models to investigate water ice clouds and atmospheric dynamics at high northern latitudes in early summer.

Paetzold M.   Tellmann S.   Peter K.   Haeusler B.   Andert T.   Hahn M.   Hinson D. P.

The Evolution of the Mars Atmosphere and Ionosphere Over Consecutive Mars Express Orbits from Radio Occultation [#6263]
The behavior of the neutral atmosphere that is the temperature profile and the ionosphere, that is the peak electron densities and altitudes of both the M1 and M2 layers, shall be described as a function of time.

Valeanu A. M.   Read P. L.

The Meteorology of Gale Crater from an Embedded Mesoscale Model into a Global Reanalysis and REMS Observations [#6429]
We study the circulation at Gale crater from the comparison between an embedded Mars mesoscale model into a global reanalysis and REMS observations, through the use of the Singular Spectrum Analysis method.

Connour K.   Schneider N. M.   Deighan J.

Regional-Scale Weather Highlights from the MAVEN/IUVS Instrument [#6126]
I will present highlights from the IUVS dataset, including:  clouds, dust, and ozone. I hope to make this dataset as visible as possible to a wide number of people, who may otherwise not know about our observations.

Brecht A. S.   Kahre M. A.   Kling A.   Wilson R. J.   Hollingsworth J. L.

Analyzing Seasonal Forcing Mechanisms of the Martian Polar Warming with the NASA Ames Mars Global Climate Model [#6275]
The presented work sets out to identify and quantify the seasonal forcing mechanisms of polar warming by utilizing the NASA Ames Mars Global Climate Model (MGCM), which is supported by the Agency’s Mars Climate Modeling Center.

Mischna M. A.   Kite E. S.   Steele L. J.

Aridity Enables Warm Climates on Mars [#6042]
We demonstrate that a water ice cloud greenhouse can realistically warm early Mars to an area-averaged temperature above the melting point of water from a cold, dry start, and stay warm for centuries or longer, but only if the planet is arid.

Hoffman M. E.   Newsom H. E.   Adair B. M.   Comellas J. M.   Williams J. M.   Williams J. P.   Calef F. J.   Grant J. A.   Wiens R. C.   Le Mouélic S.   Escarcega K.

The Recent Atmospheric History of Mars Derived from Small Craters Observed by MSL [#6371]
The crater size frequency distribution and 0.33 m cutoff crater diameter of craters observed by MSL indicates a much denser atmosphere during the ~ 20 Myr crater accumulation time as suggested by obliquity calculations.

de la Torre Juarez M.   Richardson M. I.   Newman C. E.   Plá García J.

Response of the Pressure Scale Heights Inside Gale Crater to the Diurnal Changes in Atmospheric Circulation [#6438]
The diurnal cycle of atmospheric warming, cooling and orographic flows change the thermal properties on Gale. The diurnal cycle of pressure scale heights are related here to the times at which models predict what are the likely processes on Gale.

Ogohara K.

Re-Examination of Greeley et al. (2006):  Toward an Understanding of a Correlation Between Dust Devil Frequency and Atmospheric Waves Around the Spirit Rover [#6010]
Dust devils are visually detected from images which the Spirit observed from sols 443 to 543. There seems to be no clear relation between dust devil frequency and local time at least during this short period unlike Greeley et al. (2006) reported.

Walls X.   Navarro-González R.   Martínez-Pabello P. U.   de la Rosa J.   Molina P.

Nitrate and Perchlorate Formation by Laser Ablation of Sodium Chloride in Simulated Martian Atmospheres. Implications for Their Formation in Dust Devils by Electrical Discharges [#6015]
The aim of this study is to test if nitrate and perchlorate can be produced simultaneously by electric discharges in dust devils. The simulation was carried out by laser ablation of NaCl. Nitrates were formed in greater abundance than perchlorates.

Steele L. J.   Kleinbohl A.   Kass D.   Zurek R. W.

New Insights into Thermal Tides from Mars Climate Sounder Intrack and Crosstrack Data [#6028]
We analyze Mars Climate Sounder intrack and crosstrack data to investigate the behavior of thermal tides. We reveal features that are not present using intrack data alone, which appear linked to temporal variations in the nighttime dust distribution.

 

Monday, July 22, 2019

POSTER SESSION:  DUST — STORMS, GRAINS, IMPACT ON ENVIRONMENT

10:30 a.m.   Beckman Institute Patio

BACK TO TOP

Authors

Abstract Title and Summary

Fang X.   Ma Y.   Lee Y.   Bougher S.   Liu G.   Benna M.   Mahaffy P.   Montabone L.   Pawlowski D.   Dong C.   Dong Y.   Jakosky B.

Mars Global Ionospheric and Magnetospheric Disturbances by Dust Storms and Implications for Atmospheric Carbon Loss [#6055]
We conduct the first global modeling of the Mars dust storm impact on the near-planet space environment (above 100 km altitude). Strong dust storms are potentially important in affecting atmospheric carbon loss and long-term atmospheric evolution.

Wilson R. J.   Bertrand T.   Kahre M. A.

Assessing Martian Thermal Forcing from Surface Pressure Data:  The MY34 Major Dust Storm [#6426]
Mars Global Climate Model simulations will be presented to connect the evolving distribution of dust heating during the MY34 global dust storm with the surface pressure observations at Gale crater.

Gebhardt C.   Fonseca R. M.   Abuelgasim A.   Martin-Torres J.   Zorzano-Mier M. P.

Interactive Simulation of Dust Storms by the MarsWRF GCM on a 2°×2° Grid [#6022]
In interactive dust mode, the MarsWRF General Circulation Model (GCM) allows the user to explicitly simulate the martian dust cycle

Gillespie H. E.   Greybush S. J.   Wilson R. J.

Insights into the MY 34 Global Dust Storm from the Ensemble Mars Atmosphere Reanalysis System (EMARS) [#6393]
The EMARS reanalysis is used to investigate the MY 34 global dust storm, in particular the evolution of atmospheric dust and its advection by EMARS winds.

Shirley J. H.   Kleinböhl A.   Kass D. M.   Schofield J. T.   McCleese D. T.   Steele L. J.   Piqueux S.

Rapid Dust Storm Expansion Within the Acidalia Corridor, Mars, During the Initial Growth Phase of the Planet-Encircling Dust Event of 2018 [#6149]
MRO-MCS observations reveal the rapid development (in latitude, longitude, altitude, and time) of a precursory dust storm that injected large quantities of dust to altitudes >50 km during the initiation of the 2018 planet-encircling dust event.

Batterson C. M. L.   Kahre M. A.   Bridger A. F. C.   Wilson R. J.

Martian B Storm Genesis and Evolution:  Initial Analysis of Thermal Datasets [#6441]
Of the three highly repeatable regional dust storms, named “A,” “B,” and “C” in time-sequential order, B storms are the least well-known phenomena. This study aims to characterize the generation and behavior of the B storm.

Kleinboehl A.   Spiga A.   Kass D. M.   Shirley J. H.   Millour E.   Montabone L.   Forget F.

Diurnal Variations of Dust from Mars Climate Sounder Observations During the Global Dust Event in Mars Year 34 [#6146]
We evaluate differences in dust profiles at daytime and nighttime as measured by MCS during the Global Dust Event in MY34. We compare measured dust distributions with results from the LMD GCM to investigate mechanisms of the observed variability.

Alkitbe L.   Alshemeili A.   Mohamed A.   Gebhardt C.

Case Studies on Mars Dust Storms and Exploration of Dust Climatology [#6169]
This poster will analyze dust storms based on Mars Daily Global Maps from the camera systems MRO/MARCI and MGS/MOC. The identification of dust storms in early development stages is followed by studying their temporal evolution.

Pankine A.   Newman C. E.

Dust Observed by Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer over Martian Southern Seasonal Polar Cap [#6281]
We present results of atmospheric dust opacity retrievals using TES data collected during Mars Years 24–26 over the southern seasonal polar cap. Observed dust evolution is compared to multi-year numerical simulations with MarsWRF model.

Lemmon M. T.   Guzewich S. D.   McConnochie T. H.   Martínez G.   de Vicente-Retortillo Á.   Smith M. D.   Bell J. F. III   Wellington D.   Jacobs S.

Martian Dust Particle Size During the 2018 Planet-Encircling Dust Storm as Measured by the Curiosity Rover [#6298]
Curiosity rover measurements of atmospheric dust size were made via imaging, spectra, and UV fluxes. Dust radii quickly exceeded 4–5 microns before settling to pre-storm values of 1.5–2.0 microns over ~60 martian solar days.

Schmidt M. E.   Bray S. M.   Bradley N.   Berger J. A.   Campbell J. L.   Henley T. L. J.   Perrett G. M.   Tesselear D.

Comparing Airfall Dust Coverages on Rock Targets and APXS Compositions by the MSL and MER Rovers:  Implications for M2020 PIXL [#6081]
In situ microscopic images and elemental concentrations determined by Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometers (APXS) onboard the MSL and MER Rovers represent complementary datasets to assess dust on rock surfaces and its effect on composition.

Johnson J. R.   Bell J. F. III   Lemmon M.   Grundy W.   Liang W.   Hayes A.   Deen R.

Mars Exploration Rover Pancam Spectrophotometric Modeling:  The Final Chapter [#6083]
Pancam multiple time-of-day multispectral visible/near-infrared images acquired by Spirit near Troy and by Opportunity on northern Cape York enabled photometric modeling of airfall dust deposits and the effects of dusty windows on model parameters.

Lasue J.   Cousin A.   Meslin P. Y.   Mangold N.   Wiens R. C.   Berger G.   Dehouck E.   Forni O.   Goetz W.   Gasnault O.   Rapin W.   Schröder S.   Ollila A.   Johnson J.   Le Mouélic S.   Maurice S.   Anderson R.   Blaney D.   Clark B.   Clegg S. M.   d’Uston C.   Fabre C.   Lanza N.   Madsen M. B.   Martin-Torres J.   Melikechi N.   Newsom H.   Sautter V.   Zorzano M. P.

Martian Eolian Dust Analyzed by ChemCam [#6093]
The martian eolian dust chemical composition is homogeneous at the sub-mm scale. It is different from the Aeolis Palus soils and Bagnold sands with a larger content of FeO, TiO2 and lower hydration.

Stone S. W.   Yelle R. V.   Benna M.   Elrod M. K.   Mahaffy P. R.

Transport of Water to the Martian Upper Atmosphere amid Regional and Global Dust Storms [#6363]
We characterize the delivery of water into the lower thermosphere and its impact on H escape using measurements of water-related ions from MAVEN NGIMS and calculations of water and hydrogen abundances during two martian dust storms.

 

Monday, July 22, 2019

POSTER SESSION:  SURFACE ACTIVITY I — WATER, FROST, WIND, IMPACT, AND/OR GRAVITY-DRIVEN?

10:30 a.m.   Beckman Auditorium Patio

BACK TO TOP

Authors

Abstract Title and Summary

Al Amiri M.   AlBeshr R.   Gebhardt C.   Abuelgasim A.

Case Studies on Small-to-Medium Sized Mars Craters Based on Multi-Camera Satellite Imagery [#6025]
The discovery of the so-far-largest fresh impact crater during routine weather inspection of camera imagery from cameras such as :MARCI/MRO We perform case study by identifying small to medium sized craters.

Hoover R. H.   Robbins S. J.   Putzig N. E.   Riggs J. D.   Hynek B. M.

Insight into Formation Processes of Layered Ejecta Craters on Mars from Thermophysical Observations [#6294]
This research uses thermophysical properties to investigate layered ejecta craters on Mars. We specifically seek to identify morphological characteristics of the ejecta blanket deposits to lend evidence to a formation mechanism.

Bain Z. M.   Putzig N. E.   Robbins S. J.   Hoover R. H.   Bramson A. M.   Petersen E. I.   Morgan G. A.

Analysis of Layered Ejecta Craters with Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter Shallow Radar (SHARAD) Data [#6423]
A better understanding of the formation process for LE craters on Mars can help us understand the geologic surface properties that were present during their formation. We SHARAD data to better understand the density and composition of LE craters.

Barlow N. G.

New Insights into the Characteristics and Formation of Central Pit Craters on Mars [#6066]
We are completing a solar system-wide study of central pit craters and the conditions under which they form. Our results, based largely on detailed studies of martian central pit craters, suggests a new formation model involving uplift and collapse.

Carrillo G. J.   Bennett K. A.   Edwards C. S.

The Ages of Craters with Central Mounds [#6412]
This research estimates the formation time ages of sedimentary central mounds within craters across the martian surface. These ages then allow us to determine more information about the transition from wet to dry conditions on Mars.

Chojnacki M.   Fenton L.   Banks M.   Silvestro S.   Vaz D.   Urso A.   Ewing R. C.   Lapotre M.

Wind-Driven Sand Motion Across Mars and Implications from Orbital Analysis [#6361]
We provide an update on major advances in our knowledge of contemporary aeolian bedform dynamics on Mars, including:  range of active bedform classes, boundary conditions, spatial and temporal trends, transport modes and landscape evolution implications.

Dorn T. C.   Day M. D.

Temporal Wind Variability and Erosion of the Western Delta Fan in Jezero Crater [#6276]
Jezero crater has been exposed to at least two different wind regimes throughout its subaerial history:  ancient southwesterly winds and modern easterly winds. Southwesterly winds are primarily responsible for eroding the western delta fan.

Grant J. A.   Warner N. H.   Weitz C. M.   Golombek M. P.   Wilson S. A.   Hauber E.   Ansan V.   Charalambous C.   Williams N.   Calef F.   Pike T.   DeMott A.   Kopp M.   Lethcoe-Wilson H.   Banks M.

Modification of Homestead Hollow at the InSight Landing Site Based on the Distribution and Properties of Local Deposits [#6207]
Homestead hollow is likely a degraded impact crater modified by early eolian stripping of the rim and downwind infilling followed by slow infilling and weathering punctuated by occasional impacts that removed most of the rim and filled the interior.

Mubarak W.   Abouhaligah H.   Abuelgasim A.

Monitoring the Movement of Sand Dunes in the Nili Patera Caldera on Mars Using HiRISE Images [#6024]
This research aims to investigate the possible causes of the movement and shrinkage of the martian sand dunes in Nili Patera Caldera using remote sensing and GIS techniques.

Piatek J. L.   Tornabene L. L.   Glanovsky T.   Murphy I.   Barlow N. G.   Osinski G. R.   Robbins S. J.

Interpretation of Thermophysical Ejecta Facies Mapped at Well-Preserved Martian Craters [#6350]
Crater ejecta / Mapped in thermal IR / Tells about degradation.

O’Connell-Cooper C. D.   Thompson L. M.   Spray J. G.   VanBommel S. J.   Berger J. A.   Boyd N. I.   Gellert R.   Wilhelm B. J.

Basaltic Soil Versus Dune Sediments on Mars:  A Compositional Analysis of Surficial Sediments by APXS [#6288]
Martian soils analyzed by APXS (Meridiani, Gusev, Gale) are broadly similar, with a bulk basaltic composition at all three locations. The active sands of the Bagnold barchan and linear dune fields (Gale)are compositionally distinct from soils.

Rudolph A.   Horgan B.   Bennett K.   Lewis K.   Anderson R.   Stein N.   Rice M.

Sources of Sand in Mt. Sharp:  Possible Volcanic Layers in Gale Crater, Mars [#6358]
Multiple packages of laterally continuous “marker bed” layers are observed within Mt. Sharp and are a potential sand source for the Bagnold dunes which exhibit similar spectral properties.

Schröder C.   Tait A. W.   Ashley J. W.

Mateorite Finds on Mars — a New Tool to Study Atmosphere and Surface Processes [#6254]
The Mars Exploration Rover Spirit and Opportunity have pioneered the investigation of meteorites found on Mars. Here we review some of the insights gained about Mars’ atmosphere and surface processes from their study.

Ashley J. W.   Oij S. J.   Curtis A. G.   Herkenhoff K. E.

Topographic Evaluation of Meteorite Surfaces on Mars — Exploring Amazonian Chemical and Physical Weathering Patterns [#6402]
Careful and creative study of exogenic materials (meteorites; now 45 in number) on Mars continues to inform understanding of both aqueous and physical Amazonian surficial weathering processes near the martian equator.

 

Monday, July 22, 2019

POSTER SESSION:  INTERIOR OF MARS, INCLUDING AS SEEN BY INSIGHT

10:30 a.m.   Beckman Auditorium Patio

BACK TO TOP

Authors

Abstract Title and Summary

Golombek M.   Warner N. H.   Grant J.   Hauber E.   Ansan V.   Weitz C.   Williams N.   Charalambous C.   Wilson S.   Parker T.   Daubar I.   Marteau E.   Mueller N.   Pike W. T.   DeMott A.   Kopp M.   Lethcoe-Wilson H.   Berger L.   Hausmann R.   Banks M.   Baker M.   Garvin J.

Geology of the InSight Landing Site, Mars [#6106]
InSight landed on a smooth, flat pebble rich surface with low rock abundance, impact craters in various stages of degradation, and eolian bedforms that are consistent with a surface formed dominantly by impact, mass wasting, and eolian processes.

Ansan V.   Hauber E.   Golombek M.   Warner N.   Grant J.   Maki J.   Deen R.   Calef F.   Weitz C.   Garvin J.   Wilson S.   Williams N.   Charalambous C.   Pike T.   Lethcoe H.   Kopp M.   De Moot A.   Smrekar S.   Banerdt B.   Lorenz R.

InSight Landing Site:  Subsurface Stratigraphy and Implications for Formation Processes [#6050]
The InSight lander touched down within Homestead hollow,on Late Hesperian cratered volcanic plains of western Elysium Planitia, Mars. The near-surface shows a large variability in clast size, textures (~cm thick duricrust) and spatial occurrence.

Russell C. T.   Joy S.   Yu Y.   Johnson C. L.   Mittelholz A.   Langlais B.   Chi P. J.   Fillingim M.   Smrekar S.   Banerdt W. B.

The Martian Magnetic Field as Seen by InSight [#6044]
The InSight magnetometer has revealed a strong surface field. It also sees diurnal variations and occasional pulsations. These variations indicate it will be possible to sound Mars’ interior magnetically.

Chi P. J.   Russell C. T.   Banfield D.   Johnson C. L.   Joy S.   Ma Y.   Mittelholz A.   Yu Y.   Smrekar S. E.   Banerdt W. B.

InSight Observations of Magnetic Pulsations on Martian Surface:  Initial Findings and Implications [#6215]
The InSight fluxgate magnetometer has detected magnetic pulsations on the surface of Mars for the first time. The observations have implications to the wave sources in the induced magnetosphere and whether and how these waves can reach the surface.

Spohn T.   Smrekar S. E.   Hudson T. L.   Grott M.   Knollenberg J.   Krause C.   Wippermann T.   Lichtenheld R.   Wisniewski L.   Grygorczuk J.   Reershemius S.   Spröwitz T.   Müller N.   Golombek M. P.   Banerdt W. B.   HP3 Team

The Heat Flow and Physical Properties Package HP3 on InSight — First Results [#6163]
We report on the present status of the Heat Flow and Physical Properties Package HP3 onboard the NASA mission InSight to Mars and first results.

Johnson C. L.   Mittelholz A.   Langlais B.   Lognonne P.   Pike W. T.   Joy S. P.   Russell C. T.   Yu Y.   Chi P.   Fillingim M.   Lillis R. J.   Ansan V.   Smrekar S. E.   Banerdt W. B.

Results from the InSight Fluxgate Magnetometer:  The Crustal Magnetic Field and Time-Varying External Fields at the InSight Landing Site [#6320]
We summarize results from the InSight Fluxgate magnetometer, the first ground-based magnetometer on Mars. We report on the crustal magnetic field, time varying external fields and comment on the prospects for magnetic sounding of the interior.

Daubar I. J.   Lognonne P.   Teanby N.   Lemmon M.   Schmerr N.   Posiolova L.   Banks M. E.   InSight Science Team

Impact Science on the InSight Mission — Current Status [#6198]
Before InSight got to Mars, we had many ideas about what martian impacts might look like in seismic data. Now we reshape our ideas about the martian interior, the impact environment at Mars, and seismic and atmospheric effects of impact cratering.

Bouley S.   Keane J. T.   Baratoux D.   Langlais B.   Matsuyama I.   Costard F.   Hewins R.   Sautter V.   Séjourné A.   Vanderhaeghe O.   Zanda B.

Structure of the Martian Highlands Without Impact Basins and Volcanoes [#6014]
We determine the crustal thickness of Mars before the formation of the largest impact and volcanic provinces. The reconstructed crustal thickness map provides new insight into the structure of the martian crust and the origin of the dichotomy.

 

Monday, July 22, 2019

POSTER SESSION:  MISSIONS — PAST, ONGOING, UPCOMING

10:30 a.m.   Beckman Mall Tent

BACK TO TOP

Authors

Abstract Title and Summary

Titov D. V.   Bibring J.-P.   Cardesin A.   Duxbury T.   Forget F.   Giuranna M.   Gonza?lez-Galindo F.   Holmström M.   Jaumann R.   Määttänen A.   Martin P.   Montmessin F.   Orosei R.   Pätzold M.   Plaut J.   MEX SGS Team

Mars Express Science Highlights and Future Plans [#6061]
The talk will overview the recent science highlights of the ESA Mars Express mission and outline its future plans.

Wolff M.   Vincendon M.   Gondet B.   Bibring J-P.   Flittner D.

The MEX/OMEGA Limb Dataset:  Description, Analysis Tools, Initial Results [#6094]
The the OMEGA limb data set represents a useful opportunity to characterize vertical profiles of aerosol properties, including abundance, composition, and particle size.

Pommerol A.   Read M. J.   Thomas N.   McEwen A. S.   Cremonese G.

Photometric Calibration of CaSSIS Images [#6213]
We describe the photometric calibration of images of the surface of Mars acquired by the Colour and Stereo Surface Imaging System (CaSSIS) of ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter.

Arvidson R. E.   Athena Science Team

Scientific Legacy from the Opportunity Rover’s Exploration of Meridiani Planum [#6084]
NASA’S Opportunity Rover far exceeded its 90 sol primary mission on Mars, setting records for longevity, distance traveled and scientific discoveries. This abstract highlights the scientific legacy derived from analysis of data acquired by the rover.

VanBommel S. J.   Gellert R.   Clark B. C.   Ming D. W.   Schröder C.   Yen A. S.   Berger J. A.   Boyd N. I.   O’Connell-Cooper C. D.   Thompson L. M.

Argon Partial Pressure Measurements with the Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometers:  End of Mission Results from the Mars Exploration Rovers and Ongoing Work at Gale Crater [#6089]
End of mission summary of MER APXS Ar results; Short-term enrichment in NCG; MSL APXS Ar measurements including during the MY 34 GDS; Outlook and future work.

Indyk S. J.   Spring J. W.   Paulsen G. L.   Zacny K.

Summary of Rock Abrasion Tool Activity for the Mars Exploration Rover Mission [#6400]
The Rock Abrasion Tool was used to calculate martian rocks physical properties by calculating the Specific Grind Energy (SGE) for both Spirit and Opportunity for the duration of the MER mission. These results will be presented here.

Schröder S.   Vogt D. S.   Rammelkamp K.   Hansen P. B.   Kubitza S.   Frohmann S.   Hübers H.-W.

Transient 2D and 3D LIBS Plasma Analysis for an Improved Understanding of LIBS Data Obtained on Mars [#6223]
We study the particular characteristics of martian LIBS plasmas, their dynamics and typical spatial and temporal evolution with time-resolved LIBS plasma imaging.

Millan M.   Malespin C. A.   Freissinet C.   Glavin D. P.   Mahaffy P. R.   Buch A.   Szopa C.   Srivastava A.   Teinturier S.   Williams A. J.   McAdam A.   Coscia D.   Eigenbrode J.   Raaen E.   Dworkin J.   Navarro-Gonzalez R.   Johnson S. S.

Lessons Learned from the Full Cup Wet Chemistry Experiment Performed on Mars with the Sample Analysis at Mars Instrument [#6210]
The full cup derivatization experiment performed with the SAM instrument aboard Curiosity led to the detection of derivatized molecules and supported by laboratory experiments, is helping us prepare future wet chemistry experiments at Glen Torridon .

Maki J. N.   Trebi-Ollennu A.   Banerdt W. B.   Sorice C.   Bailey P.   Khan O.   Kim W.   Ali K.   Lim G.   Deen R.   Abarca H.   Ruoff N.   Hollins G.   Andres P.   Hall J.   InSight Operations Team   InSight Science Team

An Overview of Imaging from the InSight Lander [#6403]
After landing on Mars on November 2018, the InSight lander began returning image data from two color cameras. This overview talk will provide a summary of the image data acquired.

Tornabene L. L.   Thomas N.   Cremonese G.   Almeida M.   Douté S.   Grindrod P.   Heyd R.   Luchetti A.   McEwen A.   Pajola M.   Perry J.   Pilles E.   Pommerol A.   Read M.   Seelos F.   Wray J.   CaSSIS science & ops teams

Colour and Stereo Surface Imaging System (CaSSIS) on the ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter:  Colour Data Products and Their Use for Scientific Investigations [#6293]
We summarize the expected TGO/CaSSIS standard colour and derived-data products to be provided to the public, as well as examples of their use for a variety of science investigations on Mars.

Mueller N. T.   Grott M.   Piqueux S.   Spohn T.   Smrekar S. E.   Knollenberg J.   Hudson T. L.   Spiga A.   Forget F.   Millour E.   Lemmon M.   Maki J.   Golombek M.   Banerdt W. B.

The HP3 Radiometer on InSight [#6194]
The Heat Flow and Physical Properties Package (HP³) includes an infrared radiometer observing two spots next to the InSight lander. We report on the results of temperature observations in the first 150 sols.

Le Gall A.   Ciarletti V.   Hervé Y.   Oudart N.   Corbel C.   Plettemeier D.   Tranier V.   Benedix W.-S.   Hegler S.   Vieau A.-J.

Getting Ready for Mars:  WISDOM/ExoMars 2020 Data Processing Pipeline and Field Tests [#6026]
In this paper we describe the data processing pipeline we have developed in order to analyze the GPR WISDOM/ExoMars 2020 electromagnetic soundings and the results and lessons learnt from a recent simulation operation field campaign in Chile.

Buch A.   Freissinet C.   Kaplan D.   Szopa C.   Danell R.   Grand N.   Allain T.   von Amerom F. H. W.   Glavin D.   Grubisic A.   Raulin F.   Getty S.   Li X.   Guzman M.   Stalport F.   Brinckerhoff W. B.   Goesmann F.

Results of the MOMA GC-MS Coupling Campaign with the Engineering Test Unit (ETU) [#6107]
We present our recent results obtained during the MOMA GC-MS coupling campaign with the Engineering Test Unit (ETU). We have tested three different way to analyse the martian sample:  pyrolysis, DMF_DMA derivatization and TMAH themochemolysis.

Li X.   van Amerom F.   Goetz W.   Kaplan D.   Danell R.   Grubisic A.   Getty S. A.   Castillo M.   Arevalo R. Jr.   Brinckerhoff W. B.

Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA):  Updates and Analog Sample Studies for the ExoMars Rover Mission [#6297]
We report an updated development status of the Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA), a linear ion trap-based mass spectrometer onboard the 2020 ExoMars rover mission, as well as the analog sample studies we have performed for LDI-MS mode.

Grand N.   Buch A.   Freissinet C.   Kaplan D.   Szopa C.   Danell R.   Van Amerom F. H. W.   Glavin D.   Stalport F.   Allain T.   Raulin F.   Getty S.   Brinckerhoff W. B.   Goesmann F.   MOMA Science Team

MOMA Derivatization Capsule for the Martian Sample Treatment [#6120]
We describe the derivatization technic used by MOMA instrument onboard the ExoMars mission and we demonstrate the efficiency of the method compare to the laboratory ones.

Allender E. J.   Cousins C. R.   Gunn M. D.   Caudill C. M.

Multiscale and Multispectral Characterization of Mineralogy with the ExoMars 2020 Remote Sensing Payload [#6039]
We demonstrate the multiscale and multispectral capability of the ExoMars 2020 rover remote sensing payload by detecting and characterizing science targets at analogue sites that formed in a range of aqueous environments.

De Sanctis M. C.   Altieri F.   Ammannito E.   De Angelis S.   Ferrari M.   Frigeri A.   Biondi D.   Mugnuolo R.   Pirrotta S.   Di Iorio T.   Capaccioni F.   Capria M. T.   Ciarletti V.   Ehlmann B.   Federico C.   Magni G.

Ma_MISS on ExoMars 2020 [#6016]
Ma_MISS is a visible near infrared VNIR, 0.4–2.2 μm) micro spectrometer hosted by the drill system of the ExoMars 2020 rover.The Ma_MISS instrument has been developed to provide hyperspectral images of boreholes excavated by the ExoMars rover drill.

Coates A. J.   ExoMars 2020 PanCam Team The.

The PanCam instrument for the Rosalind Franklin (ExoMars 2020) Rover [#6074]
The ESA-Russia Rosalind Franklin (ExoMars 2020) rover is due for launch in July 2020 and landing in March 2021. We describe the mission and the design of the PanCam instrument. This will help set the geological and atmospheric context for the mission.

Garcia-Florentino C.   Huidobro J.   Gomez-Nubla L.   Torre-Fdez I.   Ruiz-Galende P.   Aramendia J.   Castro K.   Arana G.   Madariaga J. M.

Raman Spectroscopy to Detect Alterations in Volcanic Mineral Phases due to Shock and Environmental Impacts [#6269]
Raman spectroscopy will be implemented in Exomars2020 and Mars2020 Missions. This technique is able to provide information about mineral phase transformations due to pressure generated in collisions (Jezero crater and surroundings).

Loizeau D.   Poulet F.   Lequertier G.   Pilorget C.   Hamm V.   Lantz C.   Bibring J.-P.   Dypvik H.   Werner S. C.

Analogue Rock Samples Observations with MicrOmega, Within the H2020/PTAL Project [#6165]
The Planetary Terrestrial Analogues Library-PTAL project aims to characterise rock samples with visible, XRD, IR, Raman and LIBS analyses. Here we present observations with a spare model of MicrOmega, a microscope imaging IR spectrometer on ExoMars.

Hervé Y.   Ciarletti V.   Le Gall A.   Corbel C.   Plettemeier D.   Vieau A. J.   Lustrement B.   Humeau O.   Hassen-Khodja R.   Benedix W. S.   Oudart N.   Bertrand E.   Lapauw L.   Tranier V.   Vivat F.   Hegler S.

WISDOM/ExoMars2020:  A Calibrated and Fully Characterized Ground Penetrating Radar Ready to Sound the Martian Subsurface [#6225]
We present measurements that have been performed on the WISDOM/ExoMars radar FM to check the instrument performances and obtain reference data that will be used on Mars to produce calibrated data and allow quantitative analysis.

Eide S.   Hamran S.   Dypvik H.   Amundsen H. E. F.

RIMFAX Ground Penetrating Radar Modelling:  Imaging the Subsurface of the Jezero Western Delta [#6070]
This study presents the potential of ground penetrating radar modelling in Jezero Western Delta, where sedimentary formations are identified in the synthetic radargram by their characteristic radar facies.

Rull F.   Manrique J. A.   Lopez G.   Sanz J. A.   Veneranda M.   Saiz J.   Medina J.   Rodriguez J.   Moral A.   Madariaga J. M.   Arana G.   Maurice S.   Cousin A.   Wiens R.   Madsen M.   Garcia V.

SuperCam Calibration Target General Design [#6326]
SuperCam instrument is part of Mars2020 scientific payload, based on Curiosity’s ChemCam. In this instrument, in addition to LIBS, other analytical techniques are included. The design of the calibration target for all of them is described.

Ollila A. M.   Wiens R. C.   Maurice S.   Cousin A.   Anderson R.   Beyssac O.   Bonal L.   Beck P.   Clegg S.   Chide B.   DeFlores L.   Dromart G.   Fischer W.   Forni O.   Fouchet T.   Gasnault O.   Grotzinger J.   Johnson J.   Lasue J.   Laserna J.   Madariaga J. M.   Madsen M.   Mangold N.   Nelson T.   Newell R.   Martinez-Frias J.   McLennan S.   Montmessin F.   Robinson S.   Sharma S.   Misra A.   Rull F.   Venhaus D.   Bernardi P.   Reess J.-M.   Reyes-Newell A.   Poulet F.   Lanza N.   Torre I.   Aramendia J.   Perez R.   Cloutis E.   Angel S.   Mimoun D.   Lorenz R.   Rapin W.   Meslin P.-Y.   Frydenvang J.   McConnochie T.   Bernard S.

Preparing SuperCam for Jezero Crater, Mars:  LIBS, Raman, VISIR, Luminescence, Imaging, and Acoustic Analyses [#6352]
SuperCam is a multi-functional instrument on the Mars 2020 rover. It will conduct LIBS, Raman, VISIR, luminescence, imaging, and acoustic analyses of the martian surface. Here, we demonstrate the synergy between these techniques.

Frizzell K. R.   Rice M. S.   Seelos F. P.

Simulating Mastcam Spectroscopy by Radiometrically Transforming CRISM Images:  A Comparison Between Rover Traverse and Orbital Data [#6409]
Radiometrically transformed CRISM data convolved to Mastcam band passes are analyzed for different mineralogical signatures and their comparisons to ground-based observations made by the MSL Curiosity rover during its traverse.

Royer C.   Poulet F.   Reess J.-M.   Pilorget C.   Hamm V.   Fouchet T.   Maurice S.   Wiens R. C.   Forni O.   Montmessin F.   Beck P.   Cloutis E.   Johnson J.

Preparing the Infrared Observations on Mars Surface:  Calibration of the Infrared Spectrometer of SuperCam/Mars2020 [#6310]
The calibration of an instrument is a critical step of development and requires the use of highly controlled lab environment. It will provide the instrument transfer function which will be widely used to link collected data to martian ground truth.

Chide B.   Maurice S.   Mimoun D.   Murdoch N.   Cadu A.   Sournac A.   Bassas M.   Gasnault O.   Meslin P-Y.   Lorenz R. D.   Wiens R. C.

Mars Acoustics:  What We Can Learn from a Microphone on the Mars 2020 Rover Mast [#6157]
Sounds are propagating on Mars atmosphere! The SuperCam Mars 2020 Microphone will record the unique signature of many artificial rover sounds such as the SuperCam laser-induced shock waves but also aeroacoustic noises generated by wind.

Lootah F. H.   Deighan J.   Fillingim M.   Jain S.

Emirates Mars Ultraviolet Spectrometer’s (EMUS) Predictions of O1356 and CO4PG Electron Impact Sources in the Martian Thermosphere [#6153]
This work focuses on the forward modeling of oxygen 135.6 and carbon monoxide 4th positive group bands’ electron impact sources in aims of predicting Emirates Mars Ultraviolet Spectrometer’s observations of the martian thermosphere.

Badri K.   Edwards C. S.   Smith M. D.   AlTunaiji E.   Christensen P. R.   AlMheiri S.   Reed H.   EMIRS Team

Scientific Payload of the Emirates Mars Mission:  Emirates Mars Infrared Spectrometer (EMIRS) [#6141]
The Emirates Mars Infrared Spectrometer (EMIRS) will be launched on the Emirates Mars Mission (EMM) in 2020 to explore the dynamics in the atmosphere of Mars on a global scale. EMIRS will focus on the lower atmosphere of the martian planet.

Al Matroushi H.   Lootah F.   Holsclow G.   Deighan J.   Chaffin M.   EMUS Team   Lillis R.   Fillingim M.   England S.   Al Mheiri S.   Reed H.

Scientific Payload of the Emirates Mars Mission:  Emirates Mars Ultraviolet Spectrometer (EMUS) Overview [#6073]
The Emirates Mars Ultraviolet Spectrometer (EMUS) is an instrument of the Emirates Mars Mission, which will launch in 2020. EMUS will observe key species (O, CO and H) in the upper atmosphere of Mars diurnally, seasonally and geographically.

Alshamsi M.   Wolff M.   Jones A.   Jeppesen C.   Osterloo M.   Khoory M.   Drake G.   AlMheiri S.   Reed H.   EXI Team

Scientific Payload of the Emirates Mars Mission:  Emirates eXploration Imager (EXI) [#6029]
Emirates eXploration Imager (EXI) instrument is one of three scientific instruments abroad the Emirate Mars Mission (EMM) spacecraft. The presentation will highlight scientific targets, CONOPS and instrument calibration plan before launch in 2020.

 

Monday, July 22, 2019

IS DUST CONTROLLING THE MARTIAN ATMOSPHERE?

1:30 p.m.   Beckman Auditorium

Chairs:  Meredith Elrod and Yuni Lee

BACK TO TOP

Times

Authors (*Denotes Presenter)

Abstract Title and Summary

1:30 p.m.

Montabone L. *   Cantor B.   Forget F.   Kass D.   Kleinboehl A.   Millour E.   Smith M. D.   Spiga A.   Wolff M. J.

Reconstructing the Onset and Evolution of Large Dust Storms on Mars [#6436]
We reconstruct the daily evolution of dust from multi-annual satellite observations (martian year 24 through 34) for studying the impact of dust storms on the atmospheric system and preparing for future forecasting.

1:45 p.m.

Heavens N. G. *

Dusty Convection on Mars:  Progress and Prospects [#6343]
Dusty heated air/Swiftly rising, mighty clouds/Leaking to the sky? Dusty heated air/Organizing many cells/Shallow convection? Dusty heated air/Energies and speeds Earth-like/Organization? Dusty heated air/However rising, mighty/I review them here.

2:00 p.m.

Kass D. M. *   Schofield J. T.   Kleinböhl A.   McCleese D. J.   Heavens N. G.   Shirley J. H.

Mars Climate Sounder Observations of the 2018 Global Dust Event and Comparisons to Previous Events [#6307]
Mars Climate Sounder observed the significant impacts of the 2018 GDE (Global Dust Event) on the atmosphere. The GDE had many similarities to the 2001 GDE. It appears that GED are distinct from even the largest regional dust storms.

2:15 p.m.

Stcherbinine A. *   Vincendon M.   Montmessin F.   Wolff M. J.   Korablev O.   Fedorova A.   Trokhimovskiy A.   Shakun A.   Ignatiev N.   Belyaev D.   Luginin M.

Martian Aerosols in the 3µm Spectral Range, During and Outside the 2018 Global Dust Event Based on the TGO/ACS-MIR Channel [#6097]
Using the new infrared solar occultation observations provided by the TGO/ACS-MIR instrument, we present vertical profiles of water ice clouds in the martian atmosphere, and the effects of the last global dust event on them.

2:30 p.m.

Elrod M. K. *   Bougher S.   Roeten K.   Sharrar R.   Murphy J.

Structural and Compositional Changes in the Upper Atmosphere Related to the PEDE-2018a Dust Event on Mars as Observed by MAVEN NGIMS [#6338]
The onset of the PEDE-18a event caused the upper atmosphere structural, compositional, and temperature changes. NGIMS had the opportunity to observe changes in the upper atmosphere. The atmosphere showed turbulence after the onset of the dust event.

2:45 p.m.

Streeter P. M. *   Lewis S. R.   Patel M. R.   Holmes J. A.   Kass D. M.

Surface Warming During the 2018/MY 34 Mars Global Dust Storm [#6242]
Surface warming during the 2018 Global Dust Storm is revealed from assimilating Mars Climate Sounder observations into a GCM. Net warming occurred at low thermal inertia regions, due to inhibited night-time cooling; elsewhere, net cooling occurred.

3:00 p.m.

Vals M. *   Forget F.   Spiga A.   Millour E.   Wang C.   Bertrand T.   Bardet D.

Modeling of Detached Dust Layers:  Parametrization of the Dust Entrainment by Slope Winds at the Top of Sub-Grid Scale Topography [#6220]
The aim is to reproduce the detached dust layers observed in the atmosphere over the whole martian year. We implement a new parametrization of the entrainment of dust by slope winds at the top of sub-grid scale topography in the GCM of the LMD.

3:15 p.m.

Bertrand T. *   Wilson R. J.   Kahre M. A.

Simulation of the 2018 Global Dust Storm on Mars Using the NASA Ames Mars GCM:  A Multi-Tracer Approach [#6284]
We model the 2018/MY34 Global Dust Storm with the NASA Ames Mars GCM, making use of the available MCS opacity maps of the MY34 GDS coupled with multi-tracer simulations to aid in identifying lifting centers and accounting for 3-D dust transport.

 

Monday, July 22, 2019

BIOSIGNATURES ON MARS

1:30 p.m.   Ramo Auditorium

Chairs:  Briony Horgan and John Moores

BACK TO TOP

Times

Authors (*Denotes Presenter)

Abstract Title and Summary

1:30 p.m.

Freissinet C. *   Glavin D. P.   Buch A.   Szopa C.   Teinturier S.   Archer P. D. Jr   Williams A. J.   Williams R.   Millan M.   Steele A.   Navarro-Gonzalez R.   House C. H.   Malespin C. A.   Mahaffy P. R.

Detection of Long-Chain Hydrocarbons on Mars with the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) Instrument [#6123]
Long-chain hydrocarbons were detected on Mars in the Cumberland clay-rich sample, with a new strategy developped to remove the oxygen from the sample and limit oxidation.

1:45 p.m.

Szopa C. *   Buch A.   Freissinet C.   Grubisic A.   Danell R.   Li X.   Guzman M.   Grand N.   Pinnick V.   Glavin D.   Stalport F.   Raulin F.   Getty S.   Brinckheroff W. B.   Goesmann D.

Assessment of the Performance of Flight Model of the Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA) Onboard the Rosalynd Franklin Rover [#6227]
The Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer is a chemical anlayzer onboard the rover of the Exomars 2020 mission. This work presents the final tests of the flight model showing it meets the analytical requirements for the detection and identification on Mars.

2:00 p.m.

Bernard S. *   Viennet J. C.   Jacquemot P.   Le Guillou C.   Balan E.   Delbes L.   Rigaud B.   Georgelin T.   Jaber M.

Searching for Biosignatures on Mars:  Experimental Perspectives [#6204]
The hydrothermal degradation of RNA in the presence of Mg-smectites leads to the precipitation of a quite uncommon mineral assemblage that could be seen as a biosignature if found on Mars.

2:15 p.m.

Lanza N. L. *   Fischer W. W.   Lamm S. N.   Gasda P. J.   Meslin P.-Y.   Ollila A. M.   Frydenvang J.   Clegg S. M.   Cousin A.   DeLapp D.   Forni O.   Reyes-Newell A.   Salvatore M.   Wiens R. C.

Manganese on Mars as an Indicator of Habitable Environments and as a Biosignature [#6445]
The recent discovery of high manganese phases on Mars opens up new possibilities for habitable environments, and such phases may represent key materials in which to find evidence of biosignatures.

2:30 p.m.

Aaron L. M. *   Steele A.   Shkolyar S.   Seelos K.   Viviano C.   Applin D.   Cloutis E.

Investigating Oxalate Mineral Formations on Mars Using CRISM Hyperspectral Imaging Data [#6365]
Significant amounts of carbonate minerals should be observed on Mars, but only small exposures have been detected. Could oxalates be the answer?

2:45 p.m.

Gasda P. J. *   Parsons B.   Nellessen M. A.   Crossey L.   Das D.   Peterson E.   Lanza N.   Yeager C.   Labouriau A.   Wiens R. C.   Clegg S.

The Potential for Prebiotic Chemistry in Borate-Bearing Clays [#6118]
Are borate-bearing clay minerals potentially a prebiotic chemical system for Mars? We will test this idea with a new set of experiments.

3:00 p.m.

DasSarma S. *   DasSarma P.   Laye V. J.

Ancient Polyextremophilic Microbes with the Potential for Survival on Mars [#6006]
Halophilic Archaea may survive on Mars due to exceptional physiological and genetic properties. By exposing cells to stressors in the laboratory or the environment, we are better understanding molecular properties for survival and adaptation on Mars.

3:15 p.m.

Vago J. L. *   Rodionov D. S.   Svedhem H.   Sefton-Nash E.   Baglioni P.   Haldemann A.   Rover Science Ops Working Group   ExoMars Science Working Team   ExoMars Project Team

ExoMars 2020 Progress [#6011]
This presentation will discuss the ExoMars 2020 mission’s preparation progress, with a focus on the rover and its strategy to search for biosignatures, including what we hope to find at the selected landing site.

 

Monday, July 22, 2019

VIEWS FROM ABOVE AND BELOW:  EXPANDING OUR KNOWLEDGE OF PAST MARS ENVIRONMENT

4:00 p.m.   Beckman Auditorium

Chairs:  Abigail Fraeman and Alfred McEwen

BACK TO TOP

Times

Authors (*Denotes Presenter)

Abstract Title and Summary

4:00 p.m.

Milliken R. E. *   Grotzinger J. P.   Wiens R.   Gellert R.   Thompson L. M.   Sheppard R.   Vasavada A.   Bristow T.   Mangold N.

The Chemistry and Mineralogy of an Ancient Lacustrine Sequence on Mars:  Lessons Learned from Integrating Rover and Orbiter Datasets [#6191]
Integrating Curiosity and MRO data for strata in Gale crater provides a mechanism to link geologic processes to orbital mineral signatures. Bridging these spatial scales and implications for mineral detects elsewhere on Mars will be discussed.

4:15 p.m.

Fox V. K. *   Bennett K. A.   Arvidson R. E.   Ehlmann B. L.   Stack K.   Dehouck E.   Grotzinger J. P.   Bristow T.   Salvatore M.   Catalano J.

Martian Clay Minerals from Orbit to the Surface:  MSL and MER Rover Investigations of CRISM Smectite Detections [#6372]
Investigation by both orbital and surface assets shows that combining information obtained at many spatial scales is critical to determining geologic context and aqueous conditions as indicated by the presence of clay minerals.

4:30 p.m.

Yen A. S. *   Gellert R.   Morris R. V.   Ashley J. W.   Berger J. A.   Clark B. C.   Cohen B. A.   Ming D. W.   Mittlefehldt D. W.   O’Connell-Cooper C. D.   Salvatore M.   Schmidt M. E.   Schroeder C.   Thompson L. M.   VanBommel S. J.

Understanding Martian Alteration Processes by Comparing In-Situ Chemical Measurements from Multiple Landing Sites [#6373]
Three is better than one:  Synergistic APXS datasets for understanding martian alteration.

4:45 p.m.

Gellert R. *   Berger J. A.   Boyd N. I.   Clark B. C.   O’Connell-Cooper C. D.   Ming D. W.   Mittlefehldt D. W.   Schroeder C.   Thompson L. M.   VanBommel S. J.   Yen A. S.

Sulfur on Mars [#6099]
Sulfates were quantified at 4 landing sites by the APXS. While S is ~5% SO3 in globally mixed soil now, very high contents in the Burns FM to very low (~1%) in clay bearing sediments indicate a significant change in environmental conditions.

5:00 p.m.

Bouchard M. C. *   Jolliff B. L.

Lithochemical Rock Suites of Endeavour Crater, Mars:  Comparing Perseverance Valley, Spirit of St. Louis, and Marathon Valley [#6235]
Possible formation mechanisms of Perseverance Valley are informed by lithochemical rock suites, including recent aeolian erosion, local aqueous alteration, mass wasting debris filling the “channel,” and a possible vertical offset of pre-impact units.

5:15 p.m.

McCollom T. M. *   Hynek B. M.

The Grasberg Formation:  A Rosetta Stone for Understanding the Origin and Diagenetic History of the Burns Formation at Meridiani Planum? [#6137]
The Grasberg and Burns formations have nearly identical chemical compositions except for variable amounts of Mg and SO3. They probably came from the same or closely related basaltic sources, and experienced similar diagenetic histories.

5:30 p.m.

Hynek B. M. *   McCollom T. M.   Szynkiewicz A.

Sulfur Cycling and Mass Balance at Meridiani, Mars [#6386]
Mass balance calculations were completed in an attempt to understand the sources of sulfur and sediments at Meridiani. None of the existing hypotheses regarding these materials can account for the mass of sulfur and large volume of sediments.

5:45 p.m.

Des Marais D. J. *   Athena Science Team

Scientific Legacy from the Spirit Rover’s Exploration of Gusev Crater [#6258]
Spirit’s findings on geological, geochemical, and atmospheric processes at Gusev are reviewed. Subject areas include volcanism and impacts, soils, dust devils, aqueous alteration and mobility, hydrothermal activity, and past habitable environments.

 

Monday, July 22, 2019

BEYOND DUST:  WHAT’S NEW WHEN OBSERVING THE WEATHER?

4:00 p.m.   Ramo Auditorium

Chairs:  Claire Newman and Matteo Crismani

BACK TO TOP

Times

Authors (*Denotes Presenter)

Abstract Title and Summary

4:00 p.m.

Banfield D. *   Spiga A.   Newman C.   Lorenz R.   Forget F.   Lemmon M.   Viudez-Moreiras D.   Pla-Garcia J.   Teanby N.   Murdoch N.   Garcia R.   Lognonne P.   Kenda B.   Perrin C.   Rodriguez S.   Lucas A.   Kawamura T.   Mimoun D.   Karatekin O.   Lewis S.   Pike W. T.   McClean J.   Charalambous C.   Mueller N.   Millour E.   Mora-Sotomayor L.   Navarro S.   Rodriguez-Manfredi J.-A.   Torres J.   Maki J.   Smrekar S.   Banerdt W. B.   InSight Team

Mars Atmospheric Science from NASA’s InSight Lander [#6348]
InSight carries a sophisticated Meteorological Station and has observed a dust storm, baroclinic waves, thermal tides, gravity waves, undular bores, convective vortices (with dust cleaning), infrasound, clouds and aeolian change. We report on these.

4:15 p.m.

Forget F. *   Banfield D.   Millour E.   Spiga A.   Newman C.   Viudez-Moreiras D.   Pla-Garcia J.   Navarro S.   Mora Sotomayor L.   Torres J.   Rodriguez-Manfredi J. A.   Lewis S.   Lorenz R.   Lognonne P.   Banerdt W. B.

Large Scale Winds and Pressure Variations Observed by InSight [#6280]
In spite of its low latitude, the Insight landing site is characterized by variabilities at various timescale of dynamical origins. The Insight met sensors provide an excellent dataset to better understand Mars meteorology and test our models.

4:30 p.m.

Spiga A. *   Banfield D.   Pla-Garcia J.   Newman C.   Murdoch N.   Lorenz R.   Lemmon M.   Lognonné P.   Kenda B.   Garcia R.   Forget F.   Millour E.   Mueller N.   Navarro S.   Rodriguez S.   Perrin C.   Banerdt W. B.   APSS/TWINS team   InSight Science Team

Exploring Mars’ Planetary Boundary Layer with InSight [#6181]
How InSight is helping to understand the martian atmosphere and weather close to the surface.

4:45 p.m.

Newman C. E. *   Baker M.   Banfield D.   de la Torre M.   Forget F.   Gomez-Elvira J.   Guzewich S.   Lewis K.   Lewis S. R.   Marin Jimenez M.   Montabone L.   Mora Sotomayor L.   Navarro S.   Pla-Garcia J.   Richardson M. I.   Rodriguez S.   Rodriguez-Manfredi J. A.   Spiga A.   Torres J.   Viudez-Moreiras D.

The Impact of Dust Storms on the Near-Surface Meteorology of Mars [#6417]
The MarsWRF model, driven by observed dust distributions, reproduces much of the observed atmospheric response to global or regional dust storms, hence may be used to indicate possible processes and feedbacks present in the real atmosphere.

5:00 p.m.

Erwin J. T. *   Aoki S.   Thomas I. R.   Trompet L.   Vandaele A. C.   Robert S.   Daerden F.   Ristic B.   Villanueva G. L.   Liuzzi G.   Lopez-Moreno J. J.   Bellucci G.   Patel M. R.

Martian Atmospheric Vertical Profiles:  Results from the First Year of TGO/NOMAD Operations [#6219]
We present results on the retrievals vertical profiles for several species in the martian atmosphere from the first year measurements of the TGO/NOMAD. In particular, we present our progress on retrieving CO, H2O, and CO2 vertical profiles.

5:15 p.m.

Korablev O. I. *   Montmessin F.   Fedorova A. A.   Trokhimovskiy A.   Luginin M.   Ignatiev N. I.   Lefèvre F.   Shakun A.   Patrakeev A.   Belyaev D. A.   Bertaux J. L.   Olsen K. S.   Baggio L.   Alday J.   Wilson C. F.   Guerlet S.   Young R. M. B.   Millour E.   Forget F.   Grigoriev A. V.   Maslov I.   Patsaev D.   Arnold G.   Grassi D.

One Year of ACS/TGO Observations of the Mars Atmosphere [#6416]
ACS onboard the ExoMars TGO) observes the martian atmosphere, using solar occultations and nadir. Status update of the ACS results obtained during one year of observations with the emphasis on trace gases, and the major dust event will be given.

5:30 p.m.

Crismani M. M. J. *   Villanueva G.   Liuzzi G.   Mumma M. J.   Smith M. D.   Vandaele A. C.   Aoki S.   Thomas I. R.   Daerden F.   Lopez-Valverde M. A.   Ristic B.   Patel M. R.   Bellucci G.   Lopez Moreno J. J.

Maps of Martian Atmospheric H2O with Trace Gas Orbiter’s NOMAD/LNO [#6222]
We present maps of H2O vapor as observed by the Trace Gas Orbiter over 10 months and across several martian seasons. These observations reveal geographic, diurnal and seasonal variations which partially agree and challenge global circulation models.

5:45 p.m.

Sharaf O.   Amiri S.   AlDhafri S.   AlRais A.   Wali M.   AlShamsi Z.   AlQasim I.   AlHarmoodi K.   AlTeneiji N.   Almatroushi H.   AlShamsi M.   AlTeneiji E.   Lootah F. *   Badri K.   AlMazmi H.   Yousuf M.   AlMheiri N.   McGrath M.   Withnell P.   Ferrington N.   Reed H.   Landin B.   Ryan S.   Pramann B.   Brain D.   Deighan J.   Chaffin M.   Edwards C.   Forget F.   Lillis R.   Smith M.   Wolff M.

Emirates Mars Mission (EMM) 2020 Overview and Status [#6058]
The Emirates Mars Mission is to launch an unmanned observatory, called Hope, in 2020. The mission is unique, and has a strong potential to create novel and significant discoveries that contribute to the global space science community.

 

Tuesday, July 23, 2019

HABITABILITY OF MODERN AND ANCIENT MARS

8:30 a.m.   Beckman Auditorium

Chairs:  Caroline Freissinet and Richard Zurek

BACK TO TOP

Times

Authors (*Denotes Presenter)

Abstract Title and Summary

8:30 a.m.

Stamenkovic V. *   Ward L. M.   Mischna M.   Fischer W. W.

Modern-Day Subsurface Habitability and How to Explore It [#6266]
We show that the modern-day martian subsurface is capable of sustaining briny environments that could contain orders of magnitude more oxygen than what is needed by aerobic microbes on the Earth to live. We also discuss how to explore such regions.

8:45 a.m.

Sizemore H. G. *   Demchenko V.   Zent A. P.   Rempel A. W.   Stillman D. E.

Habitability of High Latitude Martian Ground Ice, Revisited [#6224]
We employ numerical simulations of subsurface temperature, unfrozen water content, and water activity to constrain habitability of shallow ice-cemented ground over the past 10 Ma.

9:00 a.m.

Horgan B. *   Anderson R.   Dromart G.   Amador E.   Rice M.

Possible Lacustrine Carbonates in Jezero Crater:  Implications for Mars 2020 and Mars Sample Return [#6443]
Carbonate-bearing terrains along the western margin of Jezero crater exhibit spectral and topographic properties potentially consistent with lacustrine precipitates, which have high biosignature preservation potential.

9:15 a.m.

Hausrath E. M. *

Interpreting Potentially Habitable Past Conditions Recorded in Minerals on Mars [#6251]
Mineral assemblages at Gale crater, Jezero crater, and Oxia Planum record evidence of past water-rock interactions on Mars. Interpreting these assemblages with geochemical kinetics and thermodynamics can help interpret past habitability.

 

Tuesday, July 23, 2019

HABITABILITY OF MODERN AND ANCIENT MARS PANEL

9:30 a.m.   Beckman Auditorium

BACK TO TOP

Times

Presenter

Presentation

9:30 a.m.

Webster C. 

INVITED

9:37 a.m.

Atreya S.

Methane on Mars from MSL-Curiosity and ExoMars-Trace Gas Orbiter:  A Destructive Role of Surface Oxidants?

9:44 a.m.

Moores J.

A Diurnal Cycle in Near-Surface Atmospheric Methane Concentration from Microseepage as Constrained by TLS and TGO

9:51 a.m.

Zahnle K.

The Paradox of Mars Methane

9:58 a.m.

Viscardy S.

Searching for the Most Probable Source Locations of the Methane Detected by Curiosity and PFS in Mid-June 2013

10:05 a.m.

Novak R.

Mapping Methane and Water During Northern Mid-Winter and Mid-Summer on Mars

10:12 a.m.

 

DISCUSSION

 

Tuesday, July 23, 2019

VOLATILES AND ATMOSPHERIC EVOLUTION

8:30 a.m.   Ramo Auditorium

Chairs:  Patricio Becerra and Jeff Plaut

BACK TO TOP

Times

Authors (*Denotes Presenter)

Abstract Title and Summary

8:30 a.m.

Buhler P. B. *   Piqueux S.   Ingersoll A. P.   Ehlmann B. L.   Hayne P. O.

The Co-Evolution of Mars’ Atmosphere and Massive South Polar CO2 Ice Deposit [#6008]
Our model of Mars’ atmosphere and Massive CO2 Ice Deposit (MCID) co-evolution explains why only the south pole has an MCID, why the Residual South Polar Cap exists, and the observed MCID stratigraphy. We calculate Mars’ pressure history and MCID age.

8:45 a.m.

Warren A. O. *   Kite E. S.   Williams J.-P.   Horgan B.

Multi-Gyr History of Mars’ CO2-Dominated Atmosphere:  New Data and a New Synthesis [#6112]
New paleopressure upper limits from exhumed craters in ancient sediments shed light on Mar’s possible atmospheric pressure evolution from 4–3.8 Ga.

9:00 a.m.

Smith I. B. *

Mars Polar, Ice, and Climate Science:  A Summary of Recent Work and Our Current State of Knowledge [#6306]
In this abstract I summarize the enormous amount of work that has been done by the polar and climate community since the 8th Mars Conference and highlight science questions that will guide us into the future.

9:15 a.m.

Wernicke L. J. *   Jakosky B. M.

The History of Water on Mars:  Hydrated Minerals as a Water Sink in the Martian Crust [#6065]
We use published surveys of the global distribution and abundance of hydrated minerals (HM) to calculate the total volume of water stored in HM within the martian crust and determine that HM are a significant sink for martian water.

9:30 a.m.

Mahaffy P. R. *   Franz H. B.   Webster C. R.   Malespin C.   Atreya S. K.   Schwenzer S. P.   Stern J. C.   Pavlov A. A.   Martin P. E.   Farley K. A.   Navarro-Gonzalez R.

Atmospheric History and Surface Redox Processes Inferred from MSL and Maven Isotope Ratios [#6047]
Isotopic signatures of atmospheric loss and aqueous geochemical cycles from measurements made by MSL’s SAM in Gale crater and from orbit with MAVEN’s NGIMS.

9:45 a.m.

Nerozzi S. *   Holt J. W.   Forget F.   Spiga A.   Millour E.

Reconstructing the Climate-Driven Evolution of Planum Boreum with Sounding Radar, Visible Imagery and General Circulation Models [#6433]
Frosty caps on Mars / Don’t be shy, why are you there? / Remotely, we learn.

10:00 a.m.

Plaut J. J. *

Radar Sounding of the Polar Terrains of Mars:  Past And Prologue [#6248]
This paper presents a review of results obtained from radar observations and looks to the future of both MARSIS and SHARAD, as well as follow-on systems that can fill gaps in our understanding of the links between polar stratigraphy and climate.

10:15 a.m.

Becerra P. *   Sori M. M.   Thomas N.   Pommerol A.   Sutton S. S.   Tulyakov S.   Simioni E.   Cremonese G.

Timescales of the Climate Record in the Martian South Polar Layered Deposits [#6273]
The layered structure of Mars’ South Polar Layered Deposits is thought to record orbitally forced oscillations of climate. We reveal periodicities in the stratigraphy that match orbital frequencies and calculate accumulation rates and timescales.

 

Tuesday, July 23, 2019

POSTER SESSION:  GEOLOGY AND GEOCHEMISTRY OF GALE

10:30 a.m.   Beckman Institute Patio

BACK TO TOP

Authors

Abstract Title and Summary

Christian J. R.   Arvidson R. E.   Powell K. E.

Advanced CRISM Processing Results and Implications for Curiosity’s Traverses on Mount Sharp [#6205]
We use atmospheric models and a neural network to extract single-scattering albedo and surface kinetic temperatures to characterize sulfate-bearing strata near Mount Sharp. We use high-resolution topographic data to correct results for slope effects.

Trigler T. E.   Buz J.   Edwards C. S.   Rice M. M.   Starr M.   Seeger C.

Using Multispectral Imagery of Float Rocks to Predict Upcoming Stratigraphy at Gale Crater [#6114]
The identification of float rocks within multispectral imagery at Gale Crater allows for comparison to in situ rocks. This spectral analysis will allow us to identify materials which may be sourced from the upper stratigraphy of Mt. Sharp.

Bryk A. B.   Dietrich W. E.   Lamb M. P.   Grotzinger J. P.   Vasavada A. R.   Stack K. M.   Arvidson R.   Fedo C. M.   Fox V. K.   Gupta S.   Wiens R. C.   Williams R. M. E.   Kronyak R. E.   Lewis K. W.   Rubin D. M.   Rapin W. N.   Le Deit L.   Le Mouélic S.   Edgett K. S.   Fraeman A. A.   Banham S. G.   Huges M. N.   Kah K. C.

What was the Original Extent of the Greenheugh Pediment and Gediz Vallis Ridge Deposits in Gale Crater, Mars? [#6296]
Curiosity is approaching landforms (Greenheugh pediment and Gediz Vallis ridge) which are hypothesized to have been more aerially extensive in the past. Our work addresses these hypotheses using HiRISE-based topography and rover-based images.

Gasnault O.   Pinet P.   Wiens R. C.   Dehouck E.   Gasda P.   Forni O.   Lasue J.   Stack K.   Maurice S.   Fabre C.

Targeting and Classifying Drill Holes on Mars with ChemCam [#6199]
Cursiosity sampled the sedimentary bedrock in various formations from a basaltic to a more altered composition. We propose a robust clustering method helping to identify similar compositions and highlight differences from one locality to another.

Thompson L. M.   Berger J. A.   Boyd N. I.   Gellert R.   O’Connell-Cooper C.   Schmidt M. E.   Spray J. G.   Yen A. S.

APXS-Derived Compositions at Gale Crater and Beyond:  Implications for the History of Gale Crater and the Martian Crust [#6304]
We highlight results of the APXS geochemical investigation of Gale crater, comparing with previous rover missions as well as the martian meteorite record. We discuss the implications for the evolution of Gale crater and Mars in general.

Berger J. A.   Gellert R.   King P. L.   Ming D. W.   O’Connell-Cooper C. D.   Schmidt M. E.   Spray J. G.   Thompson L. M.   VanBommel S. J. V.   Yen A. S.

Phosphorus Results from the APXS in Gale Crater:  Occurrence and Evidence of In Situ Mobility [#6336]
Elevated P2O5 detected by the APXS in diagenetic features and fracture-associated haloes is evidence that phosphorus was mobile during and/or after emplacement of the sediment in Gale Crater.

L’Haridon J.   Mangold N.   Wiens R. C.   Cousin A.   David G.   Johnson J. R.   Fraeman A.   Rapin W.   Frydenvang J.   Dehouck E.   Schwenzer S.   Gasda P.   Lanza N.   Bridges J.   Horgan B.   House C.   Meslin P.-Y.   Salvatore M.   Gasnault O.   Maurice S.

Iron-Rich Diagenetic Features Analysed In the Murray Formation at Gale Crater, Mars, Using Chemcam Onboard the Curiosity Rover [#6079]
Plenty of dark-toned diagenetic features (nodules, veins, pseudomorphosed crystals) are observed at the Vera Rubin ridge. They are composed of crystalline hematite, related to local mobilization of Fe in late event(s) of groundwater circulation.

Baker A. M.   Ganter G. E.   Nellessen M. A.   Newsom H. E.   Jackson R. S.   Nachon M.   Rivera-Hernandez F.   Williams J.   Wiens R. C.   Frydenvang J.   Gasda P.   Lanza N.   Ollila A.   Clegg S.   Gasnault O.   Maurice S.   Meslin P.-Y.   Cousin A.   Rapin W.   Lasue J.   Forni O.   L’Haridon J.   Blaney D.   Payre V.   Mangold N.   LeDeit L.   Anderson R.

Analysis of Calcium Sulfate-Cemented Sandstones and Veins Along the MSL Traverse, Gale Crater, Mars [#6241]
We have confirmed the likely presence of Ca-S cement (interpenetrating a silicate matrix) in many ChemCam analyses using the typical 25 dust free shots on each target point to assess homogeneity of targets that are a mixture of Ca-S and silicate.

Jackson R. S.   Ollila A. M.   Nellessen M. A.   Baker A. M.   Wiens R. C.   Forni O.   Reyes-Newell A. L.   Mangold N.   Cousin A.   Frydenvang J.   Clegg S.   Newsom H. E.

Strontium in Ca-Sulfate Veins and Cements at Gale Crater, Mars [#6315]
Ca-sulfates may / Record salt content in Gale / Strontium might tell.

Comellas J. M.   Newsom H. E.   Scuderi L. A.   Gallegos Z. E.   Wiens R. C.   Bridges J. C.   Banham S.   Seeger T.

Sedimentary Structure and Morphology of the Ireson Hill Deposit, Gale Crater, Mars [#6442]
Ireson Hill, located on the Murray formation in Gale Crater, shows stratification that indicates a different depositional and erosional history than the surrounding area, but does not appear to consist of a cap of all Stimson material.

Forni O.   Meslin P.-Y.   Cousin A.   Clegg S. M.   Mangold N.   Le Deit L.   Gasnault O.   David G.   Nachon M.   Blaney D.   Newson H.   Maurice S.   Wiens R. C.   Gaft M.

Fluorine on Mars:  Seven Years of Detection with ChemCam On-Board MSL [#6095]
We report fluorine detection by ChemCam on board MSL-curiosity during its traverse. We present the geological settings in which it is found and propose some interpretaion about the mineralogical phases it is found and their respective formation.

David G.   Cousin A.   Forni O.   Meslin P. Y.   Mangold N.   L’Haridon J.   Dehouck E.   Lanza N. L.   Fraeman A. A.   Ollila A. M.   Newell A. R.   Gasnault O.   Wiens R. C.   Rapin W.   Maurice S.   Salvatore M.

Hematite Mineral Grains Observed by ChemCam Across the Vera Rubin Ridge Sedimentary Rocks at Gale Crater, Mars [#6238]
We have built a specific iron calibration curve, based on experiments using LIBS, and dedicated to iron oxide mixtures with basaltic conditions to assess the composition of diagenetic features and to track the hematite through the Vera Rubin ridge.

Dehouck E.   Cousin A.   Mangold N.   Frydenvang J.   Lasue J.   Meslin P.-Y.   Gasnault O.   Fox V. K.   Bennett K. A.   Maurice S.   Wiens R. C.

MSL/ChemCam at Glen Torridon:  Geochemistry of the Orbitally-Identified Clay-Bearing Unit of Gale Crater [#6125]
Data collected by MSL/ChemCam in the clay-bearing terrains of Glen Torridon, Gale crater, show that two compositionally-distinct types of bedrock (Mg-rich and K-rich) are present and that both bear geochemical evidence for open-system alteration.

McAdam A. C.   Sutter B.   Archer P. D.   Franz H. B.   Eigenbrode J. L.   Stern J. C.   Knudson C. A.   Lewis J. M. T.   Wong G. M.   Andrejkovicova S.   Hogancamp J. V.   Achilles C. N.   Ming D. W.   Morris R. V.   Bristow T. F.   Rampe E. B.   Navarro-Gonzalez R.   Johnson S. S.   Williams A. J.   Mahaffy P. R.

Constraints on the Chemistry and Mineralogy of the Clay-Bearing Unit from Sample Analysis at Mars Evolved Gas Analyses [#6131]
We discuss trends in the volatiles observed during Mars Science Laboratory Sample Analysis at Mars instrument evolved gas analyses of clay-bearing unit samples and their implications for depositional and diagenetic history.

Smith R. J.   Dehouck E.   McLennan S.

Amorphous Component Compositional Ranges in Gale Crater, Mars [#6324]
Sedimentary rocks in Gale crater contain significant amorphous components. We calculate possible ranges of amorphous component compositions using data uncertainties. These compositional ranges are needed to verify actual differences between samples.

Herkenhoff K. E.   Yingst R. A.   Johnson J. R.

Measuring Dust Contamination of the Mars Science Laboratory MAHLI Calibration Target using Red/Blue Color Ratios [#6101]
Mars Science Laboratory MAHLI data show changes in dust contamination on the calibration target in calibrated color data, consistent with episodic deposition and removal by winds.

 

Tuesday, July 23, 2019

POSTER SESSION:  SIGNS OF PAST WATER FLOW – OVER LAND AND IN THE GROUND

10:30 a.m.   Beckman Institute Patio

BACK TO TOP

Authors

Abstract Title and Summary

Baum M. M.   Wordsworth R. D.

Modeling Groundwater Flow to Gale in a Warming Climate [#6187]
Observations in Gale Crater point to a complex hydrological history under a potentially widely varying climate. We model groundwater flow to Gale in after a sudden warming event with a downward thawing crust.

Sheppard R Y.   Milliken R. E.   Itoh Y.   Parente M.

Mineral Stratigraphy Around Mt. Sharp Suggests Aqueous Processes Affected the Entire Mound:  Directions for Upcoming Rover Observations from Orbital Data [#6289]
Mineral mapping around Mt. Sharp shows transitions involving clays and mono- and polyhydrated sulfates are found around the mound, varying in vertical thickness. The primary or diagenetic processes that formed these minerals affected the whole mound.

Rapin W.   Ehlmann B. L.   Dromart G.   Schieber J.   Le Deit L.   Stack K.   Le Mouélic S.   Fox V.   Fischer W. W.   Clark B.   Kah L.   Mangold N.   Wiens R. C.   Thompson L.   Gabriel T. S. J.   Hardgrove C.   Vasavada A.   Edgett K. S.   Reyes-Newell A. L.

Diversity of Sulfate-Bearing Sedimentary Rocks and Paleoenvironments at Gale Crater [#6161]
Sulfate enrichments have been observed as crystals and grains, and finely disseminated in the bedrock at Gale Crater and may hold important implications paleoenvironments.

Lamm S. N.   Salvatore M. R.   Horgan B.   Chan M. A.

Constraining the Role of Diagenesis in Vera Rubin Ridge of Gale Crater, Mars:  Insights from a Terrestrial Analog Sedimentary Environment [#6370]
In 2017 Vera Rubin Ridge was reached, We found evidence the Jura might have been bleached, Comparing VRR to Jurassic Navajo Sandstone seems smart, At the very least it is a good start, since we can compared which elements were leached.

Pondrelli M.   Rossi A. P.   Le Deit L.   Schmidt G.   Pozzobon R.   Hauber E.   Salese F.

Groundwater Control on the Sulfate-Bearing Layered Deposits of Kotido Crater, Mars [#6037]
The Layered Deposits of Kotido crater (Arabia Terra) were mapped and analyzed. Fluid expulsion processes controlled by groundwater fluctuations appear to be the driving mechanism on the deposition/preservation.

Angles A.

The Qaidam Basin in North Tibet, a Martian Analogue. Applications for Landing Sites of Mars Missions [#6209]
The Qaidam Basin, in northwestern Tibetan Plateau, is a potential martian analogue that can give us insight to unfold clues to study the martian modern environments. The Qaidam Basin harbors very similar extreme conditions that those on Mars today.

Scuderi L. A.   Nagle-McNaughton T.   Newsom H. E.   Williams J.   Gallegos Z. E.

Evidence for Resurfacing and Subsequent Groundwater Seepage Peace Vallis Channel, Gale Crater, Mars [#6285]
The Peace Vallis alluvial fan (AF), dated to <2.0Ga, represents a resurfacing event with source material derived from the PV drainage. Analysis of the lower main drainage shows terrace and erosional features related to this AF resurfacing event.

Gallegos Z. G.   Newsom H. E.   Scuderi L. A.   Wiens R. C.   Grant J. A.   Gasnault O.   Le Mouélic S.   Johnstone S. E.   Escarcega K.   Edge E.

Formation and Evolution of the Multi-Stage Peace Vallis Alluvial Fan System, Gale Crater, Mars [#6419]
The Peace Vallis alluvial fan is now recognized through this study as a complex, multi-stage system (Hesperian-Amazonian) with the investigation of rover-based ChemCam RMI imagery and orbital data.

Newsom H. E.   Scuderi L. A.   Gallegos Z. E.   Nagle-McNaughton T. P.   Tornabene L. L.   Calef III F. J.   Schmidt M. E.   Churchill J.   Wiens R. C.   Grant J. A.   Palucis M. C.

Southern Watershed and Fluvial History of the Peace Vallis Fan System, Gale Crater, Mars [#6119]
The discovery of a substantially larger watershed for Peace Vallis confirms the importance of this watershed as a source for the Gale Crater lake and PV fan deposits, but especially for the late fine grained PV fan deposits of Amazonian age.

Salvatore M. R.   Goudge T. A.   Bramble M. S.   Liu Y.   Edwards C. S.

The Composition and Thermophysical Character of Jezero Crater and its Surrounding Watershed [#6264]
We highlight our current understanding of the composition and thermophysical properties of Jezero crater and its watershed in preparation for the Mars 2020 rover mission. We also describe (and advocate for) ongoing and future work.

Cowart J. C.   Rogers A. D.

The Role of Fluvial Processes in Highlands Clastic Bedrock Formation [#6130]
We report examples of fluvial landforms preserved within highlands intercrater bedrock plains. These features highlight the role of clastic processes in early martian resurfacing.

Stucky de Quay G.   Kite E.   Mayer D.

Alluvial Fan and Source Channel Systems on Mars:  Fluvial Timescales and Ancient Climate [#6452]
Mars crater rim channels sourcing alluvial fans were mapped and analyzed using erosion and sediment transport models. Total fluvial activity was between 100 yr – 1 Myr, with intermittencies and channel morphologies consistent with an arid climate.

Zigo H. F.   Edwards C. S.   Salvatore M. R.

An Ancient Inverted Valley Network Preserved by Olivine-Rich Volcanic Infill [#6295]
We have found evidence for a new and unique type of deposit:  olivine-bearing material with a sinuous and branching appearance. The goal of this effort is to determine the origin, structure, processes, and timeline of this feature.

Moore J. M.   Howard A. D.   Wilson S. P.   Morgan A. M.

Terrain-Conforming Light-Toned Mantles in the Hellas Basin Region, Mars [#6021]
There is substantial evidence for widespread deposition of a terrain-conforming, post-Noachian light-toned deposit. We give two areas as examples:  Majuro Crater, and along a fluvial system draining the NE Hellas basin slope.

Weintraub A. R.   Edwards C. S.

Determining the Uniqueness of Licus Vallis Through Regional and Local Geologic Mapping [#6425]
This project will construct a geologic map that incorporates thermophysical and compositional data to understand the formational history of Licus Vallis.

 

Tuesday, July 23, 2019

POSTER SESSION:  ANCIENT CLIMATE

10:30 a.m.   Beckman Auditorium Patio

BACK TO TOP

Authors

Abstract Title and Summary

Bultel B.   Viennet J.-C.   Poulet F.   Carter J.   Werner S. C.   Krzesińska A. M.

New Insights into Noachian Climates Thanks to Carbonate Finding in Martian Weathering Profiles? [#6154]
Carbonates are detected on martian weathering profiles at global-scale. It implies at least the presence of inorganic carbon in the starting solution and possibly local presence of other acid(s). This is consistent with denser, CO2-rich atmosphere.

Ruff S. W.   Hamilton V. E.   Rogers A. D.   Edwards C. S.   Horgan B.   Niles P. B.

On the Trail of Martian Carbonates [#6366]
The search for martian carbonates has been motivated by the desire to understand past climatic conditions. Observations of olivine-carbonate rocks in Nili Fossae and Columbia Hills, supported by lab work, suggest carbonic acid alteration.

Viennet J.-C.   Bultel B.   Werner S. C.

Experimental Investigation of the Martian Weathering Profiles Argue for a Dense Noachian CO2 Atmosphere [#6200]
Martian weathering profiles have been experimentally investigated thanks to a column system. The results show that the martian weathering profiles are better reproduced using an aqueous solution in equilibrium with a dense CO2 atmosphere.

Steakley K. E.   Kahre M. A.   Haberle R. M.   Zahnle K. J.

Testing Early Mars Impact Delivery of Reducing Greenhouse Gases with the NASA Ames Mars Global Climate Model [#6151]
We simulate the early Mars climate response to an impact accounting for water, energy, and H2 injected into the atmosphere. We assess whether the post-impact environment would be conducive to the formation of surface fluvial features.

Boatwright B. D.   Head J. W.

Mars Before the Valley Networks:  Outstanding Questions on Noachian Crater Degradation and Early Climate [#6096]
Valley networks formed / At end of Noachian / What happened before?

Thomas T. B.   Hu R.

Evolution History of the Isotopic Composition of Nitrogen in the Martian Atmosphere [#6314]
We construct a model of nitrogen evolution consistent with the present-day isotopic composition and the knowledge of volcanic outgassing and nitrate deposition. With a revised photochemical loss, our model implies a reasonable amount of outgassing.

Tarnas J. D.   Mustard J. F.   Sherwood Lollar B.   Cannon K. M.   Palumbo A. M.   Plesa A.-C.   Bramble M. S.

Mars Could have been Warmed by Eccentricity Variations or a Subsurface Biosphere [#6345]
Based on our knowledge of abiotic CH4 formation on Earth, the CH4 that may have generated above-freezing conditions on Mars via transient reducing greenhouse atmospheres likely did not form abiotically.

Scudder N. A.   Horgan B.   Rutledge A.   Rampe E. B.   Smith R. J.   Graly J.

Mineralogical Signatures of Cold and Icy Climates on Ancient and Modern Mars [#6437]
Based on results from glacial Mars analog sites in Oregon and in mafic regions of the Antarctic ice sheet, ice/snowmelt weathering is consistent with observed Amazonian and Hesperian sediments, but warmer climes are required for Noachian mineralogy.

Hill J. R.   Christensen P. R.

New Constraints on the Formation Ages of the Chloride-Bearing Deposits in the Martian Southern Hemisphere [#6115]
An improved global mapping of chloride-bearing deposits has shown they formed almost exclusively in the Noachian, with the largest number forming in the Late Noachian before their formation mechanism very quickly ceased in the very early Hesperian.

Holo S. J.   Kite E. S.   Robbins S. J.

Mars Obliquity Through Deep Time:  New Constraints from the Bombardment Compass [#6091]
Elliptic crater orientations provide a “bombardment compass” for Mars, recording the angles between impactors and Mars’ spin axis. Comparison of models and global data constrain Mars’ obliquity to be lower than expected throughout the Amazonian.

Banham S. G.   Gupta S.   Rubin D. M.   Edgett K. S.   Van Beek J.   Watkins J. A.   Edgar L. A.   Fedo C. M.   Stack K. M.   Vasavada A. R.

A Rock Record of Complex Hesperian Aeolian Bedforms in Gale Crater, Mars [#6122]
A planet’s ancient climate / Laid bare to see / In fragmented desert stones.

Miura Y.   Kato T.

Martian World between the Moon and Earth:  EARTH:  Imcomplete Global System [#6444]
Martian rocky environments with atmosphere are three isolated rock-age peaks clearly, which might be regional activity of impact shocked processes developed to any habitable environment with carbon-volatiles related with air and rocks with fluids.

 

Tuesday, July 23, 2019

POSTER SESSION:  HABITABILITY AND BIOSIGNATURES

10:30 a.m.   Beckman Auditorium Patio

BACK TO TOP

Authors

Abstract Title and Summary

Chaouche N.   Stalport F.   Cottin H.   Audoux T.   Rouquette L.   Lasne J.   Szopa C.   Coll P.

Studying the Evolution of Nucleobases in Mars-Like Conditions:  Impacts of Perchlorates on Uracil and Cytosine Under Ultra-Violet Irradiation [#6080]
This study focuses on the effect of a calcium perchlorate solid phase on the evolution of nucleobases (uracil and cytosine) in a martian simulated environment (in terms of temperature, pressure and UV radiation).

Williams J. W.   Nagle-McNaughton T. P.   Newsom H. E.   Gallegos Z. E.   Wilkie H. A.   Martinez D. C.   Scuderi L. A.

Remote Sensing Techniques to Investigate Potential Recent Exposure on Mars for High Biosignature Preservation Potential [#6413]
Analyzing aeolian dominated erosion scarp retreat in Jezero crater can aid in the identifying fresh outcrops that were previously shielded from solar and cosmogenic radiation and may be useful to identify samples with potential biosignatures.

Ruiz-Galende P.   Siljeström S.   Torre-Fdez I.   Castro K.   Arana G.   Madariaga J. M.

Spectroscopic Analysis of Organic Molecules in Martian Analogue Samples [#6182]
The analysis of organic molecules in a basaltic martian analogue similar to the stratigraphy of the landing sites of the next ESA and NASA missions to Mars is shown. Finding organic molecules may help in the search of present or past life in Mars.

Guzman M.   Szopa C.   Freissinet C.   Buch A.   Fornaro T.   Goesmann F.

Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Detection of Diagnostic Features of Molecular Bioindicators Adsorbed on Minerals Relevant to ExoMars’s MOMA Instrument [#6167]
The Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA) includes a gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GCMS). This study tests the GCMS detection of organic bioindicators adsorbed on a mineral at three concentrations in the presence of Mg-perchlorate.

Nellessen M. A.   Crossey L.   Peterson E.   Gasda P. J.   Lanza N.   Yeager C.   Parsons B.   Labouriau A.   Wiens R. C.   Clegg S.   Das D.

Boron Adsorption in Clay Minerals:  Implications for Martian Groundwater Chemistry and Prebiotic Processes [#6353]
Experimental analysis of boron adsorption to Mars-analog clays to understand boron interactions in martian setting and to improve boron detection using LIBS analysis. Boron-clays on Mars have potential prebiotic implications.

Gloesener E.   Karatekin Ö.   Dehant V.

Stability of Clathrate Hydrates at Low Latitude on Mars [#6170]
In this work, the stability depth of methane clathrate hydrates in the martian subsurface is investigated considering sloped surfaces at low latitude and especially in regions where methane has been locally reported.

Luo Y.   Mischna M. A.   Yung Y. L.   Kleinböhl A.   Chen P.

Localizing Putative Methane Sources on Mars from Spacecraft Observations and Back-Trajectory Modeling Techniques [#6057]
We have used back-trajectory modeling techniques to localize the source of Mars methane plumes detected at Gale crater. Our method simplifies the localization problem and our first results look promising that the approach will succeed.

Viscardy S.   Daerden F.   Neary L.   Giuranna M.   Etiope G.   Oehler D.

Searching for the Most Probable Source Locations of the Methane Detected by Curiosity and PFS in Mid-June 2013 [#6162]
An innovative statistical approach of atmospheric model simulations was developed to search for the most likely source locations of methane emitted in the atmosphere. This method was applied to the release event detected by Curiosity and PFS in 2013.

Moores J. E.   King P. L.   Smith C. L.   Martinez G. M.   Newman C.   Guzewich S.   Meslin P.-Y.   Atreya S.   Webster C.   Mahaffy P.   Schuerger A. C.

A Diurnal Cycle in Near-Surface Atmospheric Methane Concentration from Microseepage as Constrained by TLS and TGO [#6102]
TGO provides a powerful constraint on the methane concentration of the bulk martian atmosphere which can be used to calculate the flux of methane out of the subsurface with MSL’s TLS instrument. A diurnal cycle would be expected.

Novak R. E.   Mumma M. J.   Villanueva G. L.   Faggi S.

Mapping Methane and Water During Northern Mid-Winter and Mid-Summer on Mars [#6346]
We present maps of methane on Mars for mid-Northern Summer and mid-Northern Winter. Column densities of methane vary with season, peaking during the summer, and location. We conclude that Methane is released in plumes from the sub-surface.

Atreya S. K.   Encrenaz T.   Korablev O.   Mahaffy P. R.   Moores J. E.   Vandaele A. C.   Webster C. R.   Meslin P.   Navarro-Gonzalez R.

Methane on Mars from MSL-Curiosity and ExoMars-Trace Gas Orbiter:  A Destructive Role of Surface Oxidants? [#6067]
We propose a hypothesis of fast destruction of methane by surface oxidants near the surface of Mars to reconcile apparent discrepancy between the TGO data, which show no methane on Mars, and the MSL data, which show a low background level of methane and occasional spikes.

Meslin P.-Y.   Weinmann J.   Moores J.   Smith C. L.   Forget F.   Millour E.   Gough R.   Atreya S.   Webster C.   Mahaffy P.

Implications of a Strong Adsorption Process on the Variability of Methane in the Martian Atmosphere [#6401]
We explore the effect of adsorption of methane in the regolith on its atmospheric distribution using a GCM. We try to reproduce the variations of CH4 observed by SAM at Gale and investigate if this process could reconcile SAM and TGO observations.

Zahnle K. J.   Catling D. C.

The Paradox of Mars Methane [#6132]
The most economical way to reconcile paradoxical disagreements between observers on the levels of methane on Mars is that the gas has yet to be detected. We show that MSL detections of methane are at the level of instrumental noise.

 

Tuesday, July 23, 2019

POSTER SESSION:  ICE AND FROST

10:30 a.m.   Beckman Mall Tent

BACK TO TOP

Authors

Abstract Title and Summary

Landis M. E.   McEwen A. S.   Daubar I. J.   Hayne P. O.   Byrne S.   Dundas C. M.   Sutton S. S.   Britton A.   Herkenhoff K. E.

Mars’ Polar Layered Deposits Geology and History as Revealed by Impact Craters [#6335]
We summarize the state of knowledge on the surface ages of both the north and south polar layered deposits and discuss results from a new, dated impact on the South Polar Layered Deposits (SPLD).

Emmett J. A.   Murphy J. R.   Kahre M. A.

Quantifying Net Annual Polar Deposition Rates of Water Ice and Dust on Mars at Various Obliquities with the Ames Mars General Circulation Model [#6144]
Layers in Mars’ Polar Layered Deposits may record climate change over the past ~ Myrs. We employ a climate model to demonstrate that obliquity cycle-induced variations in polar deposition may produce complex stratigraphy reminiscent of PLD structure.

Khayat A. SJ.   Smith M. D.   Guzewich S. D.

Understanding the Water Cycle Above the North Polar Cap on Mars Using MRO CRISM Retrievals of Water Vapor [#6290]
MRO/CRISM retrievals of water vapor column abundances over the North Polar Region (NPR) of Mars were performed, where a maximum value of 90 pr–µm is retrieved over the ice-covered regions, as compared to 60 pr–µm over ice-free regions.

Pascuzzo A. C.   Condus T.   Mustard J. F.   Arvidson R. E.

The Effects of Ice and Dust Aerosols, and Surface Scattering on the Interpretation of the Martian North Polar Ice Cap Surface Characteristics Using CRISM VNIR-SWIR Data [#6380]
VNIR-SWIR studies investigating seasonal changes of the polar ice caps should prioritize corrections for the variable state of aerosols in the atmosphere and surface scattering behavior of ice in order to minimize error and misinterpretation.

Bapst J.   Byrne S.   Bandfield J. L.   Hayne P. O.   Piqueux S.

Thermophysical Evidence for Recent Accumulation and Ablation of Water Ice at the North Pole of Mars [#6328]
Derived thermal properties of north-polar exposed water ice supports regionally-variable accumulation and ablation. Identifying both lateral and vertical spatial variability is important for understanding the polar layered deposits, past and present.

Wilcoski A. X.   Hayne P. O.

Modeling Surface Texture Formation of the Martian North Polar Residual Cap [#6129]
We model the insolation-driven evolution of the martian north polar residual cap surface texture, and investigate the timescales over which these features form.

Angell P.   Christensen P.  R.

Comparison of Seasonal Temperature Variations, Albedo Variations, and Sublimation Activity for CO2 ice and H2O Ice Near the Martian South Pole [#6168]
This project investigates seasonal temperature and albedo variations in two martian south polar regions with the goal of understanding the CO2 sublimation processes and the differences between regions covered with H2O ice and CO2 ice.

Cesar C.   Pommerol A.   Thomas N.   Becerra P.   Hansen C. J.   Portyankina G.   Cremonese G.

Polar Spots on Mars Observed with the Colour and Stereo Surface Imaging System (CaSSIS) [#6253]
Polar sublimation-driven processes, such as seasonal fans and dark spots, are being studied with CaSSIS images to understand their origins and composition.

Portyankina G.   Aye K.-M.   Schwamb M. E.   Hansen C. J.   Michaels T.

Planet Four Pursuit of Studying Seasonal Activity and Spring Atmosphere with Citizen Science [#6158]
We survey dark fan deposits from CO2 jets using Planet Four catalog. The deposits reveal evolution of the seasonal ice in spring and its inter-annual variability, serve as wind direction indicators and potentially – as wind magnitude indicators.

Urata R. A.   Kahre M. A.   Wilson R. J.

Seasonal CO2 Cap Retreat in the NASA Ames Mars Global Climate Model [#6311]
We use the NASA Ames Mars global climate model to study the seasonal CO2 cap retreat. We compare the model output to various measurements of the seasonal caps such as the estimated total mass and the surface area covered.

Widmer J. M.   Diniega S.

Constraining Environmental Conditions for Dune-Alcove Formation in the Northern Mid-Latitude Region of Mars [#6147]
Dune-alcoves are geologic features forming under a specific set of environmental conditions in northern hemisphere dune fields. This study compares mid-latitude dune fields with and without alcoves to constrain these conditions.

Voelker M.   Hauber E.   Cardesín-Moinelo A.   Martin P.

Quantifying the Latitudinal Distribution of Volatile-Related Landforms on Mars’ Southern Hemisphere, Terra Cimmeria [#6060]
We applied the so-called grid-mapping method in order to analyze the geospatial distribution of volatile-related landforms in Terra Cimmeria. We were able to relate the geography of landforms to their latitudes, and hence, climatic environments.

Rice J. W. Jr.   Farrand W. H.

Fire and Ice:  Volcanic Domes and Remnant Ice in Western Arcadia Planitia [#6189]
Mineralogic and morphologic evidence supports the interpretation of domes in western Arcadia as being volcanic in origin and that they have associated remnant mantled ice-cored aprons similar to lobate debris aprons.

Harrison T. N.   Stuurman C. M.

Distribution of Scalloped Depressions in Western Utopia Planitia and Implications for Their Formation [#6432]
Here we map the extent of scalloped depressions in Western Utopia to look at their formation and implications for the Late Amazonian history of Mars.

Sejourne A.   Costard F.   Losiak A.   Swirad Z. M.   Smith I.   Balme M. R.   Conway S. J.   Gallagher C.   Hauber E.   Johnsson A. E.   Orgel C.   Rasmdale J. D.   Reiss D.   Skinner J. A. Jr.   Van Gasselt S.

Constraining the Ice-Content and Timing of Deposition of Ice-Rich Deposits in Utopia Planitia:  SHARAD, Stratigraphy and Crater Counting