53rd Lunar and Planetary Science Conference

March 7-11, 2022

The Woodlands, Texas

 

Program and Abstracts

Times listed are Central Standard Time (CST).  Time Zone Converter

6:30 a.m. PDT

8:30 a.m. CDT

9:30 a.m. EDT

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11:30 p.m. JST

 

PROGRAM LISTING

ORAL

Monday Program

Tuesday Program

Wednesday Program

Thursday Program

Friday Program

POSTER

Monday Program

Tuesday Program

Wednesday Program

Thursday Program

 

 

SESSION LISTING

ORAL

Monday Orals

Tuesday Orals

Wednesday Orals

Thursday Orals

Friday Orals

POSTER

Monday Posters

Tuesday Posters

Wednesday Posters

Thursday Posters

 

 

 

Sunday Afternoon, March 6, 4:00–8:00 p.m.

Conference Check-in and Welcome Reception

 

 

ORAL SESSIONS

 

Monday Morning, March 7, 8:30 a.m.

Waterway Ballroom 1

M101

Astrobiology:  “I Find the Lack of Life Disturbing”

Waterway Ballroom 4

M102

Special Session:  Analysis of Hayabusa2 Returned Samples from Ryugu

Waterway Ballroom 5

M103

Petrology, Petrogenesis, and Geochemistry of Martian Meteorites, Crust, and Mantle

Waterway Ballroom 6

M104

Lunar Cratering and Regolith

Montgomery Ballroom

M105

The Martian Atmosphere:  High Altitude, Aerosols, Early Mars

 

Monday Afternoon, March 7, 1:00 p.m.

Waterway Ballroom 4, 5, & 6

M121

Plenary Session:  Masursky Lecture

 

Monday Afternoon, March 7, 2:15 p.m.

Waterway Ballroom 1

M151

Low-Temperature Alteration on Chondritic Asteroids

Waterway Ballroom 4

M152

Special Session:  A Year of Perseverance at Jezero I

Waterway Ballroom 5

M153

Remote Analysis of Ryugu and Bennu from Hayabusa2 and OSIRIS-REx

Waterway Ballroom 6

M154

Lunar Geophysics:  The Crust, The Core, and So Much More

Montgomery Ballroom

M155

Ocean Worlds and Icy Volcanism:  The Briny Deep

 

Tuesday Morning, March 8, 8:30 a.m.

Waterway Ballroom 1

T301

Analysis and Curation of Pristine Returned Samples from Ryugu and Bennu

Waterway Ballroom 4

T302

Special Session:  Venus, the Emerging Planet:  What We Know and Don’t Know Before the Upcoming Missions

Waterway Ballroom 5

T303

A Year of Perseverance at Jezero II

Waterway Ballroom 6

T304

Lunar Volatiles and Exosphere

Montgomery Ballroom

T305

Pluto and New Juno Results at Ganymede and Io

 

Tuesday Afternoon, March 8, 1:00 p.m.

Waterway Ballroom 4, 5, & 6

T321

Plenary Session:  NASA Headquarters Briefing

 

Tuesday Afternoon, March 8, 2:15 p.m.

Waterway Ballroom 1

T351

Differentiated Parent Bodies from Core to Crust

Waterway Ballroom 4

T352

Special Session:  Advancing Inclusion, Diversity, Equity, and Accessibility in the Planetary Workforce

Waterway Ballroom 5

T353

Aeolian and Modern Processes on Mars

Waterway Ballroom 6

T354

Venus:  So Hot Right Now

Montgomery Ballroom

T355

Mapping Lunar Water

 

 

 

Tuesday Afternoon, March 8, 3:45 p.m.

Montgomery Ballroom

T356

Lunar Exploration Activities

 

Wednesday Morning, March 9, 8:30 a.m.

Waterway Ballroom 1

W501

Presolar Grains and Interplanetary Dust Particles

Waterway Ballroom 4

W502

Special Session:  The Chinese Lunar and Planetary Exploration Program:  Recent Moon and Mars Results

Waterway Ballroom 5

W503

Alteration Processes and Water Distribution on Mars

Waterway Ballroom 6

W504

Near-Earth and Main-Belt Asteroids:  Physical Characteristics and Surface Composition

Montgomery Ballroom

W505

Icy Body Tectonics and Interiors:  All It's Cracked Up To Be

 

Wednesday Morning, March 9, 10:00 a.m.

Waterway Ballroom 1

W506

Organic Components in Chondrites

 

Wednesday Afternoon, March 9, 11:45 a.m.

Waterway Ballroom 4, 5, & 6

W520

Plenary Session:  Artemis Town Hall

 

Wednesday Afternoon, March 9, 1:00 p.m.

Waterway Ballroom 4, 5, & 6

W521

Plenary Session:  Future Science:  NASA's Early Career Award Winners

 

Wednesday Afternoon, March 9, 2:15 p.m.

Waterway Ballroom 1

W551

Impact Processes on Terrestrial Bodies

Waterway Ballroom 4

W552

Special Session:  Apollo’s Legacy for Lunar and Planetary Science, from Lunar Sample Analysis to Solar System Studies

Waterway Ballroom 5

W553

Water on Mars Through Time and Space

Waterway Ballroom 6

W554

Planetary Volcanism:  From Melt to Morphology

Montgomery Ballroom

W555

Formation and Evolution of Comets and Kuiper Belt Objects:  Way Out There

 

Thursday Morning, March 10, 8:30 a.m.

Waterway Ballroom 1

R701

Protoplanetary Disk Structure and Evolution

Waterway Ballroom 4

R702

Exoplanets:  Inside and Out

Waterway Ballroom 5

R703

Sedimentary Rocks on Mars:  Deposition, Diagenesis, and Stratigraphy

Waterway Ballroom 6

R704

Celebrating Apollo 16 and 17 Missions:  A Perspective for the Future of Lunar Exploration

Montgomery Ballroom

R705

Titan:  So Chill Right Now

 

Thursday Morning, March 10, 10:00 a.m.

Waterway Ballroom 4

R706

Mercury:  Building the Smallest Planet

 

Thursday Afternoon, March 10, 1:00 p.m.

Waterway Ballroom 4, 5, & 6

R721

Plenary Session:  R&A Town Hall

 

Thursday Afternoon, March 10, 2:15 p.m.

Waterway Ballroom 1

R751

Chondritic Components:  CAIs and Chondrules

Waterway Ballroom 4

R752

Martian Geophysics and Tectonics

Waterway Ballroom 5

R753

Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity:  Geochemistry in Gale Crater

Waterway Ballroom 6

R754

Lunar Petrology and Geochemistry:  It Was Cool Even Before Chang'e 5

Montgomery Ballroom

R755

Collision Processes on Asteroids and the Moon, a Potpourri

 

Friday Morning, March 11, 8:30 a.m.

Waterway Ballroom 1

F901

Using Impact Craters to Understand Mars

Waterway Ballroom 4

F902

The Martian Cryosphere:  A Frozen Red Planet

Waterway Ballroom 5

F903

Martian Geochemistry:  Minerals and Methods

Waterway Ballroom 6

F904

Lunar Volcanism:  The Floor is Made of Lava!

Montgomery Ballroom

F905

Space Weathering:  Experiments, Simulations, and Observations

 

Friday Morning, March 11, 10:00 a.m.

Waterway Ballroom 1

F906

Thermal and Shock Metamorphism in Chondrites

 

PROGRAM LISTING

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SESSION LISTING

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Times listed are Central Standard Time (CST).  Time Zone Converter

6:30 a.m. PDT

8:30 a.m. CDT

9:30 a.m. EDT

3:30 p.m. CEST

11:30 p.m. JST

 

POSTER SESSIONS

 

Monday Evening, March 7, 6:30 p.m.

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session I

M201

Special Session:  A Year of Perseverance at Jezero

M202

Searching for Life Beyond Earth:  “Never Tell Me the Odds”

M203

Petrology, Petrogenesis, and Geochemistry of Martian Meteorites, Crust, and Mantle

M204

Analysis and Curation of Pristine Returned Samples from Ryugu, Bennu, and More

M205

Planetary Atmospheres

M206

Lunar Volatiles and Exosphere

M207

Lunar Geophysics, Tectonics, and Regolith

M208

Icy World Oceans, Composition, and Volcanism

M209

Planetary Data and Infrastructure:  Build It and They Will Come

M210

Terrestrial Operational Analogs

M211

Planetary Exploration Activities

M212

Advances in Techniques for Lunar Science

M213

Inner Solar System Mission Concepts

M214

Lunar Instruments and Payload Concepts

M215

Non-Lunar Instruments and Payload Concepts

 

Tuesday Evening, March 8, 6:30 p.m.

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session II

T401

Venus:  Hotting Up

T402

Education and Workforce Development:  Engaging through the Stories and Tools of Planetary Science

T403

Icy Body Tectonics and Interiors:  All It's Cracked Up To Be

T404

Formation and Evolution of Comets and Kuiper Belt Objects:  Way Out There

T405

Outer Solar System Missions and Instrumentation

T406

Small Bodies:  Physical Characteristics and Surface Composition

T407

Aeolian and Modern Processes on Mars

T408

Martian Lakes, Rivers, and Gullies… Oh My!

T409

Alteration Processes on Mars:  Hot and Cold Mish-Mash

T410

Volcanism on Mars

T411

Differentiated Parent Bodies from Core to Crust

T412

Presolar Grains and Interplanetary Dust Particles

T413

Icy World Impacts

T414

Impact Processes on Earth

T415

Environmental Analogs

T416

Material Analogs

 

Wednesday Evening, March 9, 6:30 p.m.

iPoster/Gather.town

Poster Session III

W601

Advances in Techniques for Lunar Science

W602

Apollo’s Legacy for Lunar and Planetary Science, from Lunar Sample Analysis to Solar System Studies

W603

Lunar Geophysics, Impacts and Regolith

W604

Lunar Impact Cratering

W605

Lunar Petrology and Geochemistry

W606

Lunar Volatiles and Exosphere

W607

Lunar Volcanism

W608

Special Session:  The Chinese Lunar and Planetary Exploration Program:  Recent Moon and Mars Results

W609

Mercury:  Building the Smallest Planet

W610

Impact Processes on Earth

W611

Special Session:  A Year of Perseverance at Jezero

W612

Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity and Geochemistry in Gale Crater

W613

Aeolian and Modern Processes on Mars

W614

Alteration Processes on Mars:  Hot and Cold Mish-Mash

W615

Evidence for Water and Ice at the Martian Surface and Near Subsurface

W616

The Martian Cryosphere:  A Frozen Red Planet

W617

Martian Geochemistry:  Minerals and Methods

W618

Martian Geophysics and Tectonics

W619

Mars Impact Cratering

W620

Geologic History, Stratigraphy, and Data Processing of the Martian Rock Record and Landforms

W621

Planetary Data and Infrastructure:  Build It and They Will Come

W622

Venus:  Hotting up

W623

Venus:  A Mappers Paradise

W624

Exoplanets

W625

Analysis of Hayabusa2 Returned Samples from Ryugu

W626

Chondrites and Their Components

W627

Presolar Grains and Interplanetary Dust Particles

W628

Protoplanetary Disk and Nebular Processes

W629

Curation of Pristine Returned Samples from Small Bodies

W630

Differentiated Meteorites

W631

Petrology, Petrogenesis, and Geochemistry of Martian Meteorites, Crust, and Mantle

W632

Space Weathering

W633

Small Bodies:  Samples, Observations, and Models

W634

Small Bodies:  Impact Processes

W635

Small Bodies:  Missions and Mission-Related Studies

W636

Astrobiology:  "This is Not the Life You're Looking For"

W637

Planetary Atmospheres

W638

Volcanism Across the Solar System:  From Modeling to Analog Morphology

W639

Icy Body Tectonics and Interiors:  All It's Cracked Up To Be

W640

Icy World Impacts

W641

Icy World Oceans, Composition, and Volcanism

W642

Titan:  So Chill Right Now

W643

Formation and Evolution of Comets and Kuiper Belt Objects:  Way Out There

W644

Environmental Analogs

W645

Material Analogs

W646

Planetary Exploration Activities

W647

Terrestrial Operational Analogs

W648

Inner Solar System Mission Concepts

W649

Outer Solar System Missions and Instrumentation

W650

Instruments and Payload Concepts

W651

Education and Workforce Development:  Engaging through the Stories and Tools of Planetary Science

 

Thursday Evening, March 10, 6:30 p.m.

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session IV

R801

Apollo’s Legacy for Lunar and Planetary Science, from Lunar Sample Analysis to Solar System Studies

R802

Lunar Petrology and Geochemistry

R803

Lunar Impact Cratering

R804

Lunar Volcanism

R805

Mercury:  Building the Smallest Planet

R806

Basins on Mars:  Gale, Jezero, and Other Sequences

R807

Evidence of Ice at the Martian Surface and Subsurface

R808

Mars Mapping and Methods for Orbiter Data Analysis

R809

Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity:  Geochemistry in Gale Crater

R810

Poster Session:  In Person:  Martian Geochemistry:  Minerals and Methods

R811

Martian Geophysics and Tectonics

R812

The Martian Cryosphere:  A Frozen Red Planet

R813

Mars Impact Cratering

R814

Small Bodies:  Impact Processes

R815

Titan:  So Chill Right Now

R816

Chondrites and Their Components

R817

Protoplanetary Disk and Nebular Processes

R818

Space Weathering

R819

Exoplanets

 

 

 

PROGRAM LISTING

ORAL

Monday Program

Tuesday Program

Wednesday Program

Thursday Program

Friday Program

POSTER

Monday Program

Tuesday Program

Wednesday Program

Thursday Program

Back to Top

 

SESSION LISTING

ORAL

Monday Orals

Tuesday Orals

Wednesday Orals

Thursday Orals

Friday Orals

POSTER

Monday Posters

Tuesday Posters

Wednesday Posters

Thursday Posters

Back to Top

 

Times listed are Central Standard Time (CST).  Time Zone Converter

6:30 a.m. PDT

8:30 a.m. CDT

9:30 a.m. EDT

3:30 p.m. CEST

11:30 p.m. JST

 

ORAL SESSIONS

 

[M101]

Monday, March 7, 2022
ASTROBIOLOGY:  “I FIND THE LACK OF LIFE DISTURBING”

8:30 a.m.   Waterway Ballroom 1

Chairs:  Kennda Lynch and Julie Castillo-Rogez

Times

Authors (*Presenter)

Abstract Title and Summary

8:30 a.m.

 

Session Introduction

8:35 a.m.

Buckner D. K. *   Anderson M. J.   Wisnosky S.   Alvarado W.   Williams A. J.   et al.

Origin-Diagnostic Patterns in Lipid Distributions:  Strategies for Life Detection [#2571]
Origin-diagnostic lipid distributions are determined from a statistical analysis of published terrestrial and meteorite data, for astrobiological applications.

8:45 a.m.

Sharma S. *   Drummond S. M.   Maloney C. M.   Gonzalez Henao S.   Karanauskas V.   et al.

Investigating Thermal Catalytic Conversion of a Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) to a Biologically Extant Quinone on Planetary Relevant Mineral Substrates:  Implications for Origins of Life [#1521]
PAHs may undergo thermal catalytic reactions on mineral surfaces to produce biomolecular precursors like quinones that influence the origins of life chemistries.

8:55 a.m.

Elmasry W. *   Kebukawa Y.   Aponte J. C.   Kobayashi K.

Effects of Mineral Assemblages in Meteorites on Amino Acid Production in the Water-Bearing Parent Bodies [#1804]
We evaluated the effects of mineral assemblages of meteorite powders for amino acid production in conditions simulating water-bearing meteorite parent bodies.

9:05 a.m.

Cooper G. *   Jackson W.   Thompson M.   Rios A. C.   Yeung K.   et al.

Possible Mechanism(s) in the Photo-Magnetic Production of Enantiomer Excesses [#2843]
Did early solar system photo-magnetic forces create enantiomer excesses in organic compounds?

9:15 a.m.

 

Panel Q&A

9:30 a.m.

Zhao L. *   Perez-Fernandez C. A.   DiRuggiero J.   Ramesh K. T.

Identifying the Limits of Life Due to Impact-Induced Mechanical Stresses on Extremophiles [#2577]
A novel impact experiment adaptation is used to determine the survival of extremophiles under dynamic pressure and shear stress for planetary protection policy.

9:40 a.m.

Lakrout C. A. *   Jones N. T.   Tisato N.

Relating Unique Cave Structures to Micro-Biomes [#2591]
We analyzed rare cave formations in Colorado and their micro biomes to understand the relationship between morphology and microbiome.

9:50 a.m.

Fisher K. R. *   Ewing R. C.   Sweeney M.

Erodibility of Microbial Mats and the Implications for Preservation of Microbially Induced Sedimentary Structures (MISS) [#2147]
Aeolian and subaqueous erosion thresholds were measured for a set of microbial mat structures to understand the likelihood of preservation in the rock record.

10:00 a.m.

Gibbons E. F. *   Leveille R. J.   Berlo K.

Fixed Nitrogen as a Tracer of Habitable Environments on Mars:  Enabling In Situ Spectral Detection [#2345]
To seek a martian / Peer into the rocks and ask / “Are there nutrients?”

10:10 a.m.

 

Panel Q&A

10:25 a.m.

Lynch K. L. *   Rivera-Valentín E. G.   Soto A.   Chevrier V. F.   Méndez A.

Terrestrial Validation of a Habitat Suitability Model for Brine Environments on Mars [#2403]
Here, we provide a terrestrial validation to our Habitat Suitability Index Model for martian brine environments.

10:35 a.m.

Osborne S. D. *   Chevrier V. F.   Molayousefi M. D.   Moradi M.

Chao/Kosmotropic Properties of Brine Solutions in the Presence of Ancient Proteins and Their Assistance in the Bioavailability and Precipitation of Life-Necessary Organic Molecules [#2848]
This project investigates how chao/kosmotropicity effects the stability of ancient proteins present in brine solutions across the solar system.

10:45 a.m.

Sheppard R. Y. *   Fraeman A. A.   Barge L. M.   Weber J. M.   Rodriguez L.   et al.

Laboratory Sediment Column Simulations of Chemical and Redox Gradients in the Martian Groundwater Environment [#2460]
Sediment columns simulating the martian groundwater environment through time show changes in redox and pH conditions through time and with depth.

10:55 a.m.

Cary F. *   Deamer D.   Damer B.   Fagents S.

The Role of Iron in Protocell Formation; Implications for Origin of Life Processes on Early Mars [#1249]
We demonstrate an example of a specific geochemical difference between Mars and Earth that could have meaningfully affected the origin of life processes on early Mars.

11:05 a.m.

 

Panel Q&A

11:20 a.m.

 

Panel Q&A Final Discussion

11:27 a.m.

 

Session Closure

 

[M102]

Monday, March 7, 2022
SPECIAL SESSION:  ANALYSIS OF HAYABUSA2 RETURNED SAMPLES FROM RYUGU

8:30 a.m.   Waterway Ballroom 4

Chairs:  Shogo Tachibana and Michael Zolensky

Times

Authors (*Presenter)

Abstract Title and Summary

8:30 a.m.

 

Session Introduction

8:35 a.m.

Yurimoto H. *   Hayabusa2-Initial-Analysis Chemistry Team   Hayabusa2-Initial-Analysis Core

Chemical and Isotopic Characterization of Asteroid Ryugu [#1377]
Returned samples from C-type asteroid Ryugu show strong similarities to CI (Ivuna-like) carbonaceous chondrites.

8:45 a.m.

Nakamura T. *   Matsumoto M.   Amano K.   Enokido Y.   Zolensky M. E.   et al.

Early History of Ryugu’s Parent Asteroid:  Evidence from Return Sample [#1753]
Formation and evolution of Ryugu’s parent asteroid were estimated based on mineralogical and physical properties of 16 coarse Ryugu particles.

8:55 a.m.

Noguchi T. *   Matsumoto T.   Miyake A.   Igami Y.   Haruta M.   et al.

Mineralogy and Space Weathering of Fine Fraction Recovered from Asteroid (162173) Ryugu [#1747]
The grains recovered from Ryugu by the Hayabusa2 have mineralogy similar to that of CIs and show unique surface modifications related to space weathering.

9:05 a.m.

Okazaki R. *   Marty B.   Busemann H.   Hashizume K.   Gilmour J.   et al.

Isotopic Compositions of Noble Gases and Nitrogen in the Ryugu Samples Returned by Hayabusa2 [#1348]
We report the first results of measurements for isotopic ratios and concentrations of noble gases and nitrogen in the Ryugu samples returned by the Hayabusa2.

9:15 a.m.

 

Panel Q&A

9:30 a.m.

Yabuta H. *   Cody G. D.   Engrand C.   Kebukawa Y.   De Gregorio B.   et al.

Macromolecular Organic Matter in C-Type Asteroid Ryugu [#2241]
The initial analysis results on macromolecular organic matter from the asteroid Ryugu samples are presented by the Hayabusa2 Organic Macromolecule team.

9:40 a.m.

Naraoka H. *   Takano Y.   Dworkin J. P.   Hayabusa2-Initial-Analysis SOM Team   Hayabusa2-Initial-Analysis Core

Soluble Organic Compounds in Asteroid 162173 Ryugu [#1781]
We report soluble organic compounds in the slovent-extract samples in the Ryugu grains collected by the Hayabusa2 spacecraft.

9:50 a.m.

Yokoyama T. *   Hayabusa2-Initial-Analysis Chemistry   Hayabusa2-Initial-Analysis Core

Multi-Isotopic Analyses of Bulk Ryugu Samples Returned by the Hayabusa2 Mission [#1273]
We report preliminary results on the isotopic compositions of Ti, Cr, and Pb obtained from the Ryugu samples and some carbonaceous chondrites.

10:00 a.m.

Young E. D. *   Tang H.   Tafla L.   Pack A.   Di Rocco T.   et al.

The Oxygen Isotopic Composition of Samples Returned from Asteroid Ryugu:  Evidence for Similarity to CI Chondrites [#1290]
Oxygen isotope analyses of samples returned from asteroid Ryugu resemble CI chondrites but differ in being free of terrestrial contamination.

10:10 a.m.

 

Panel Q&A

10:25 a.m.

Amano K. *   Matsuoka M.   Nakamura T.   Kagawa E.   Hiroi T.   et al.

Reflectance Spectral Comparison Between a Large Ryugu Returned Sample and Carbonaceous Chondrites [#1789]
We measured reflectance spectra of the samples collected from asteroid Ryugu by Hayabusa2 and compared the results with those of carbonaceous chondrites.

10:35 a.m.

Zolensky M. E. *   Dolocan A.   Bodnar R. J.   Gearba I.   Martinez J.   et al.

Direct Measurement of the Composition of Aqueous Fluids from the Parent Body of Asteroid 162173 Ryugu [#1451]
Direct compositional measurements of trapped brines in an asteroid Ryugu sample reveal formation beyond the H2O and CO2 snow lines.

10:45 a.m.

Thompson M. S. *   Zanetta P-M.   Zega T. J.   Noguchi T.   Yurimoto H.   et al.

Evidence for Micrometeoroid Bombardment on the Surface of Asteroid Ryugu [#2134]
Surface of Ryugu / Micrometeoroids cause / Some space weathering.

10:55 a.m.

Nagashima K. *   Kawasaki N.   Sakamoto N.   Yurimoto H.   Hayabusa2-Initial-Analysis Chemistry   et al.

In-Situ Oxygen and Manganese-Chromium Isotope Studies of Ryugu:  Implications to Temperature and Timing of Aqueous Activity [#1689]
Oxygen and Mn-Cr isotope systematics of minerals in Ryugu suggest they formed through low-temperature aqueous alteration (~37 °C) at ~5.2 Ma after CAI formation.

11:05 a.m.

 

Panel Q&A

11:20 a.m.

 

Panel Q&A Final Discussion

11:27 a.m.

 

Session Closure

 

BACK TO TOP

 

[M103]

Monday, March 7, 2022
PETROLOGY, PETROGENESIS, AND GEOCHEMISTRY OF MARTIAN METEORITES, CRUST, AND MANTLE

8:30 a.m.   Waterway Ballroom 5

Chairs:  Valerie Payre and Vinciane Debaille

Times

Authors (*Presenter)

Abstract Title and Summary

8:30 a.m.

 

Session Introduction

8:35 a.m.

Mukhopadhyay S. *   Peron S.

Mars Interior Accreted Chondritic Volatiles in the Presence of a Gas Disk [#2851]
Chondritic gases in substantial amounts were being incorporated into Mars interior prior to dissipation of the solar nebula.

8:45 a.m.

Collinet M. *   Plesa A.-C.   Ruedas T.   Schwinger S.   Breuer D.

Mantle Sources of Martian Basalts as Constrained by MAGMARS, a New Melting Model for FeO-Rich Peridotite [#1951]
Primitive mantle? / Depleted, re-fertilized? / Same temperature?

8:55 a.m.

Semprich J. *   Filiberto J.

Modeling the Crystallization of Martian Igneous Compositions [#1224]
Modeling basalts / Martian rocks melt much better / When they are perplexed.

9:05 a.m.

Yang S. *   Humayun M.   Righter K.   Irving A. J.   Hewins R. H.   et al.

Mantle Source Mineralogy Inferred from Incompatible Element Ratios in Shergottites [#2481]
Shergottite analysis were used to evaluate the partitioning behavior of trace elements, which yields insights into the mineralogy of shergottite source region.

9:15 a.m.

 

Panel Q&A

9:30 a.m.

Zhang X. J. *   Tian Z.   Day J. M. D.   Moynier F.   Wang K.

Rubidium Isotope Composition of Mars [#1666]
We report the first Rb isotopic measurements of martian meteorites, which provide constraints on volatile depletion mechanisms affecting terrestrial planets.

9:40 a.m.

Mouser M. D. *   Dygert N.

Clinopyroxene-Melt Trace Element Partitioning in Fe- and Al-rich Basaltic Systems:  Applications to Nakhlite Petrogenesis [#1100]
Experimentally determined trace element partition coefficients in Fe- and Al-rich basalts applied to nakhlite pyroxenes to understand nakhlite petrogenesis.

9:50 a.m.

Griffin S. *   Daly L.   Piazolo S.   Forman L. V.   Lee M. R.   et al.

What Can Crystallographic Orientation Tell Us About Nakhlite Formation? [#1880]
Emplacement on Mars / Can augite relationships / Provide some insight?

10:00 a.m.

North T. L. *   Collins G. S.   Muxworthy A. R.   Davison T. M.   Steele S. C.   et al.

The Heterogeneous Response of Martian Meteorite Allan Hills 84001 to Planar Shock [#1340]
Impact induced shear / Under the martian surface / Heats meteorite.

10:10 a.m.

 

Panel Q&A

10:25 a.m.

Day J. M. D. *   Agee C. B.   Herd C. D. K.   Howarth G. H.   Irving A. J.   et al.

Shergottites of the Amazonian [#2949]
Shergottites of the Amazonian provide an important archive of the evolution of the martian mantle.

10:35 a.m.

Eckley S. A. *   Ketcham R. A.

Supercool(ed) Olivine Morphology in Shergottites Revealed Using X-Ray Computed Tomography [#2245]
Fast olivine growth / At depth on Mars? This implies / Magma cooled quickly.

10:45 a.m.

Chowdhury P. *   Brounce M.   Boyce J-W.   McCubbin F-M.

The Oxidation State of Sulfur in Martian Apatite — Implications for Redox of Surficial Processes [#1494]
Sulfur oxidation state in apatite from martian meteorites can constrain the oxygen conditions of the alteration event on planetary surfaces.

10:55 a.m.

Benaroya S. *   Gross J.   Burger P.   Righter M.   Lapen T. J.

Olivine-Gabbroic Shergottite Northwest Africa (NWA) 13227:  A Link Between Gabbroic and Poikilitic Shergottites? [#1175]
We present compositional and textural evidence for Northwest Africa 13227 to represent a possible link between gabbroic and poikilitic shergottites.

11:05 a.m.

 

Panel Q&A

11:20 a.m.

 

Panel Q&A Final Discussion

11:27 a.m.

 

Session Closure

 

[M104]

Monday, March 7, 2022
LUNAR CRATERING AND REGOLITH

8:30 a.m.   Waterway Ballroom 6

Chair:  Joshua Cahill and Terik Daly

Times

Authors (*Presenter)

Abstract Title and Summary

8:30 a.m.

 

Session Introduction

8:35 a.m.

Liu T. *   Wünnemann K.   Michael G.

3D-Simulation of Lunar Megaregolith Evolution:  Quantitative Constraints on Spatial Variation and Size of Fragment [#1107]
A spatially resolved numerical model is built to investigate the evolution of lunar megaregolith and its fragment size distribution.

8:45 a.m.

Keane J. T. *   James P. B.   Matsuyama I.

The Moon Without Impact Basins, and the Nature of the South Pole — Aitken Basin and the Farside Highlands [#1477]
The Moon’s farside highlands may be the ejecta from the south pole-Aitken basin impact.

8:55 a.m.

James P. B. *   Keane J. T.   Lee J. S.

South Pole–Aitken Basin Ejecta Inferred from Crustal Thickness [#1500]
Starting with the assumption that ejecta from the SPA impact event was weakly symmetric, we derive a plausible map of ejecta from crustal thickness.

9:05 a.m.

Davison T. M. *   Baijal N.   Collins G. S.

High Resolution Oblique Impact Simulations of the Formation of the South Pole-Aitken Basin [#2444]
High resolution / SPA impact models / Probe thermal structure.

9:15 a.m.

 

Panel Q&A

9:30 a.m.

Sodha G. *   Dhingra D.

Mg-Spinel Exposures in the South-Pole Aitken (SPA) Basin:  New Insights into the Stratigraphic Relationships, Spatial Distribution, and Varieties [#2894]
Tiny pink pieces at Thomson / Are closer to SPA than we thought / They are in the inner circle.

9:40 a.m.

Martinot M. *   Donaldson Hanna K. L.   Greenhagen B. T.   Peplowski P.   Cahill J. T. S.

Investigating Pure, Crystalline Plagioclase Outcrops Exposed on Humboldt Crater Using Mł and Diviner Data [#2136]
Moon Mineralogy Mapper and Diviner data are used in order to investigate plagioclase-rich outcrops exposed on the central peak of Humboldt Crater.

9:50 a.m.

Moriarty D. P. III *   Simon S. B.   Shearer C. K.   Haggerty S. E.   Petro N. E.   et al.

Orbital Assessment of the Distribution and Composition of Spinel Across the Crisium Region:  Insights from Luna 20 Samples [#2139]
Moon Mineralogy Mapper spectral parameters are used to assess the composition and distribution of spinels around Crisium in the context of Luna 20 soil samples.

10:00 a.m.

Czajka E. A. *   Retherford K. D.   Kramer G.   Hendrix A.   Cahill J. T. S.   et al.

Aristarchus Crater Mapped in the Far-Ultraviolet with LRO LAMP [#2162]
Combing far-ultraviolet observations from LRO LAMP with laboratory and M3 spectra, this study maps unique plagioclase units at Aristarchus Crater.

10:10 a.m.

 

Panel Q&A

10:25 a.m.

Atang E. F. M. *   Bart G. D.

Measurements of Regolith Depth from a Young Mare Surface on the Moon [#2554]
We report measurements of lunar regolith depth from young mare with median regolith depth of 4.0m. Regolith does not appear to be thinner on this young surface.

10:35 a.m.

Rincon A. E. *   Elder C. M .   Douglass B.

The Relationship Between Regolith Thickness and Time as Inferred from Cold-Spot Craters [#2688]
Regolith thickness in the maria does not increase with surface age based on the blockiness of cold-spot crater ejecta blankets.

10:45 a.m.

Chertok M. A. *   Lucey P. G.   Costello E. S.   Ireland S. M.

The Abundance of Rocks on the Lunar Maria is Not a Function of Surface Age [#1031]
We examine craters with rocky ejecta across a range of mare units differing in age. We find that the abundance of rocky craters is independent of surface age.

10:55 a.m.

Cahill J. T. S. *   Martin A. C.   Hayne P. O.   Patterson G. W.   Greenhagen B. T.   et al.

A Comparison of the Atlas/Hercules Thermophyiscal Anomaly and Radar-Dark Halo Craters [#2797]
An examination of the Atlas/Hercules thermophysical anomaly region relative to radar-dark halo craters.

11:05 a.m.

 

Panel Q&A

11:20 a.m.

 

Panel Q&A Final Discussion

11:27 a.m.

 

Session Closure

 

[M105]

Monday, March 7, 2022
THE MARTIAN ATMOSPHERE:  HIGH ALTITUDE, AEROSOLS, EARLY MARS

8:30 a.m.   Montgomery Ballroom

Chairs:  Robert Lillis and Jim Head

Times

Authors (*Presenter)

Abstract Title and Summary

8:30 a.m.

 

Session Introduction

8:35 a.m.

Manju G. *   Mridula N.

First Estimations of Gravity Wave Potential Energy in the Martian Thermosphere:  An Analysis Using MAVEN NGIMS Data [#1364]
This study explores spatio-temporal variations of GWPE during different seasons to unravel its contribution to the mean flow in martian thermosphere.

8:45 a.m.

Almatroushi H. *   Deighan J.   Edwards C.   Holsclaw G.   Wolff M.   et al.

Results from the Emirates Mars Mission (EMM) — Hope Probe [#1338]
Hope is continuously collecting data on the martian atmosphere since its arrival to Mars on February 9th 2021. This presentation will highlight the key results.

8:55 a.m.

Lillis R. J. *   Deighan J.   Jain S.   Holsclaw G.   Chaffin M.   et al.

First Global Images of Mars FUV Discrete Aurora from the Emirates Mars Mission EMUS Instrument [#2644]
The EMM EMUS instrument provides spectacular first images of Mars’ FUV discrete Aurora, reflecting the highly dynamic nature of the martian plasma environment.

9:05 a.m.

Lo D. Y. *   Atreya S. K.   Wong M. H.   Trainer M. G.   Franz H. B.   et al.

What Can Drive the Atmospheric O2 Variations Observed by MSL SAM? [#2178]
We evaluate the possible atmospheric and surface drivers behind the unexpected O2 VMR variations observed by SAM QMS on the MSL Curiosity rover.

9:15 a.m.

 

Panel Q&A

9:30 a.m.

Conway S. J. *   Bickel V. T.   Patel M. R.   Fenton L.   Carson H.

Global Survey of Dust Devils in CTX Data Using Neural Networks [#1874]
We perform a global survey for dust devil vortices using a neural network to search through Context Camera (CTX) images spanning Mars Years 28–35.

9:40 a.m.

Leseigneur Y. *   Vincendon M.

An Opportunity to Characterize the Martian Dust Spirit:  Atmospheric Dust Optical Depth Calculated Using OMEGA/MARS EXPRESS [#1192]
Monitoring martian dust optical depth in the near-IR with OMEGA/MEx:  Similarities/differences with TIR studies and time correlation with RSL sites.

9:50 a.m.

Alsaeed N. R. *   Hayne P. O.   Concepcion V.

Dust-Driven Polar Vortex Dynamics and Snowfall from Mars Climate SounderObservations [#1792]
We use data from the Mars Climate Sounder to study patterns in the polar vortex and CO2 ice clouds over the northern pole, as well as determine snowfall rates.

10:00 a.m.

Mendenhall S. M. *   Martínez G. M.   Savijärvi H.   Aoki S.   Vandaele A. C.   et al.

Constraining the Vertical Distribution of Water Vapor on Mars:  Implications for the Martian Water Cycle [#2423]
Modeling the vertical water vapor profile of the martian atmosphere to understand the near-surface environment.

10:10 a.m.

 

Panel Q&A

10:25 a.m.

Fan B. M. *   Jansen M. F.   Mischna M. A.   Kite E. S.

Why are Mountain-Tops Cold? — The Decorrelation of Surface Temperature and Topography Due to the Decline of the Greenhouse Effect on Early Mars [#1698]
Mountain-tops were cold-traps on early Mars like the Earth, but they are not on modern Mars. We find the transition is due to the greenhouse effect decline.

10:35 a.m.

Head J. W. III *   Wordsworth R. D.   Fastook J. L.

When Did Mars Become Bipolar? An Analysis of the Key Factors in the Late Noachian-Amazonian Climate Transition [#2074]
When did Mars become bipolar? A parsimonious model for the transition from a Noachian altitude T-dominant atmosphere/climate to modern latitude T-dominant.

10:45 a.m.

Lyons J. R. *

Oxygen Isotope Fractionation Due to Non-Thermal Escape of Hot O from the Atmosphere of Mars [#2662]
A Rayleigh distillation model of hot O escape from 175 km yields isotope results consistent with Curiosity SAM measurements of CO2 and SNC secondary minerals.

10:55 a.m.

Thomas T. B. *   Hu R.   Lo D. Y.

Joint Models for the Evolutionary History of Carbon, Nitrogen, and Argon in the Martian Atmosphere [#2327]
We present coupled evolution models of atmospheric CO2, N2, and Ar that are consistent with the modern size and isotopic composition of the martian atmosphere.

11:05 a.m.

 

Panel Q&A

11:20 a.m.

 

Panel Q&A Final Discussion

11:27 a.m.

 

Session Closure

 

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PROGRAM LISTING

ORAL

Monday Program

Tuesday Program

Wednesday Program

Thursday Program

Friday Program

POSTER

Monday Program

Tuesday Program

Wednesday Program

Thursday Program

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SESSION LISTING

ORAL

Monday Orals

Tuesday Orals

Wednesday Orals

Thursday Orals

Friday Orals

POSTER

Monday Posters

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[M121]

Monday, March 7, 2022
PLENARY SESSION:  MASURSKY LECTURE

1:00 p.m.   Waterway Ballroom 4, 5, & 6

Times

Masursky Lecture

 

1:00 p.m.

 

Martha Gilmore

 

To Venus and Back Again

 

Martha S. Gilmore is the Seney Professor of Geology in the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences at Wesleyan University in Middletown, Connecticut. Gilmore is a geologist who specializes in the study of planetary surfaces using geomorphic mapping and violet/near-infrared (VNIR) spectroscopy on Venus, Mars, and Earth. She compares spectral signatures from field and laboratory work to orbital images to better interpret the signals received from remote sensing platforms.

 

Gilmore is a world-renowned expert on Venus geology and the oldest rock units on Venus located in tessera terrain. This work includes interpretation of tessera structures and stratigraphy using Magellan radar to show that they were formed in an extinct geodynamic regime, including the lateral accumulation of materials via compression followed by a period of extension prior to the eruption of the plains that cover most of the surface of Venus. She has utilized the atmospheric spectral window at 1 µm to examine tessera in both Venus Express and Galileo data to show that the emissivity of tesserae differ from the presumably basaltic plains in a manner consistent with more iron-poor, felsic compositions, which is the strongest evidence to date that these rocks contain evolved magmas formed on a more water-rich planet.

 

Gilmore’s work on Mars includes the development of autonomous strategies for the identification and return of geologically important VNIR spectra from rovers and orbit. Much of the current Mars work in her lab includes VNIR spectroscopy of Mars analog minerals, including hydrous carbonates and Mars analog brines. She has developed techniques to synthesize these minerals in a Mars chamber she and her students designed that allows collection of VNIR and Raman spectra under Mars conditions. On local field sites in Connecticut, she has collected VNIR data in the field over several growing seasons to develop techniques to identify P. australis (common reed), an invader in the local marshes, in remote sensing aerial and satellite data.

 

Gilmore has served NASA as co-chair of the Committee on Astrobiology and Planetary Sciences, as a member of the Committee on Planetary and Lunar Exploration and the Planetary Science Decadal Survey, and as Deputy Chair of the Venus Exploration Analysis Group. She is a science team member on the Deep Atmosphere Venus Investigation of Noble Gases, Chemistry and Imaging (DAVINCI) and Venus Emissivity, Radio Science, InSAR, Topography and Spectroscopy (VERITAS) missions to Venus. In addition, she has been a co-investigator on other Discovery and New Frontiers proposals as well as other mission and instrument concept ideation and study. She was the principal investigator of a Venus Flagship Mission Concept Study for the current Planetary Decadal Survey.

 

Gilmore is a Fellow of the Geological Society of America and was the 2020 recipient of the Geological Society of America Randolph W. “Bill” and Cecile T. Bromery Award for Minorities. She is an author on 57 refereed papers and proceedings, 12 of which have been with student co-authors, and has been awarded over $3.2M in external funding. She earned a B.A. in Geology from Franklin and Marshall College, a Sc.M. and Ph.D. in Geological Sciences from Brown University, and took a postdoctoral fellowship at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory prior to her arrival at Wesleyan in 2000. At Wesleyan, she has served as the Director of Graduate Studies, Chair of the Earth and Environmental Sciences Department, and helped found the Planetary Science Group, which awards a minor and an M.A. degree.

 

 

 

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[M151]

Monday, March 7, 2022
LOW-TEMPERATURE ALTERATION ON CHONDRITIC ASTEROIDS

2:15 p.m.   Waterway Ballroom 1

Chairs:  Henner Busemann and Romy Hanna

Times

Authors (*Presenter)

Abstract Title and Summary

2:15 p.m.

 

Session Introduction

2:20 p.m.

Schrader D. L. *   Davidson J.   Foustoukos D.   Alexander C. M. O’D.   Torrano Z. A.   et al.

Tarda and Tagish Lake:  Samples from the Same Outer Solar System Asteroid? [#1157]
Space rocks so altered / Similar to each other / From same asteroid.

2:30 p.m.

Glavin D. P. *   McLain H. L.   Parker E. T.   Elsila J. E.   Aponte J. C.   et al.

Extraterrestrial Amino Acids in the C2 Ungrouped Carbonaceous Chondrite Tarda:  A Unique Distribution [#1097]
Extraterrestrial amino acids were identified in the C2 ungrouped Tarda meteorite with a distribution that is unique from other carbonaceous chondrites.

2:40 p.m.

Haenecour P. *   Barnes J.

In-Situ Heating Experiments of the Tarda Meteorite:  Effects of Thermal Processing on Aqueously Altered Carbonaceous Chondrite [#2607]
We report new results from in-situ heating of fine-grained materials from the Tarda meteorite.

2:50 p.m.

Viennet J.-C. *   Hubert F.   Beck P.   Alp E. E.   Lavina B.   et al.

Reappraisal of the Clay Mineralogy of Orgueil by X-Ray Diffraction Profile Modelling [#1403]
Reappraisal of the clay mineralogy of the Orgueil meteorite by X-ray profile modelling to constraint the geochemical processes that presided to its formation.

3:00 p.m.

 

Panel Q&A

3:15 p.m.

Schultz C. D. *   Anzures B. A.   Milliken R. E.   Hiroi T.

How Variable are Hydration Signatures of CM2 Chondrites? — Comparing Spectra of Meteorite Powders and Chips Across Multiple Spatial Scales [#1572]
Spectra of chondrites / Are remarkably diverse / At the micron scale.

3:25 p.m.

Findlay R. *   Greenwood R. C.   Franchi I. A.   Anand M.   King A. J.   et al.

Assessing the Oxygen Isotope Heterogeneity in Aguas Zarcas, Mukundpura and Kolang [#2647]
Warm cosmic hot tub / Wet and dry are now as one / Juxtaposed in stone.

3:35 p.m.

Jenkins L. E. *   Lee M. R.   Daly L.   King A. J.   Li S.

Calc-Silicate Metasomatism in CM Chondrites Shidian and Kolang:  The First Report of Asteroidal Hydroandradite [#1515]
Hydroandradite / New metasomatic phase / In CM chondrites.

3:45 p.m.

Pacnik H.   Eckart L. M.   Krietsch D.   Maden C.   Busemann H. *

Noble Gases in the Very Primitive CM Chondrites Asuka 12085 and 12236 — Filling the Gap [#1987]
Noble gases confirm that A-12085 and 12236 are very primitive CMs; the accreted matrix contains Ar-rich grains that are destroyed by very mild aqueous alteration.

3:55 p.m.

 

Panel Q&A

4:10 p.m.

Prestgard T. J. *   Beck P.   Bonal L.   Eschrig J.   Krämer Ruggiu L.   et al.

The Parent Bodies of CR Chondrites and Their Secondary History [#1257]
A spectroscopic analysis of 10 CR chondrites suggest that they stem from asteroids with Xk and/or Cgh/Ch spectral traits, depending on their secondary history.

4:20 p.m.

Ushikubo T. *   Yamaguchi A.   Weisberg M. K.   Kimura M.   Ebel D. S.

Consistently High d13C Carbonates in CR Chondrites:  Implication for Accreted Ice in a Cold and Distant Region from the Sun [#1321]
We found that Ca-rich carbonates in CR chondrites consistently have high d13C values (>50 permil) like carbonates in the Tagish Lake meteorite.

4:30 p.m.

Che S. *   Zega T. J.

NaCl in an Itokawa Particle:  Terrestrial or Asteroidal? [#1041]
Our new TEM data of NaCl crystals in an Itokawa particle suggest that they may have formed by fluid alteration on the asteroid.

4:40 p.m.

Floyd C. J. *   Macente A.   Daly L.   Hanna R. D.   Lee M. R.

Brecciation on the Aguas Zarcas Parent Body Revealed Using Clast Petrofabrics [#1470]
Chondrules in chondrites / What secrets are they hiding / Fabrics reveal all.

4:50 p.m.

 

Panel Q&A

5:05 p.m.

 

Panel Q&A Final Discussion

5:12 p.m.

 

Session Closure

 

[M152]

Monday, March 7, 2022
SPECIAL SESSION:  A YEAR OF PERSEVERANCE AT JEZERO I

2:15 p.m.   Waterway Ballroom 4

Chairs:  Vivian Sun and Justin Simon

Times

Authors (*Presenter)

Abstract Title and Summary

2:15 p.m.

 

Session Introduction

2:20 p.m.

Sun V. Z. *   Hand K. P.   Stack K. M.   Farley K. A.   Milkovich S.   et al.

Exploring the Jezero Crater Floor:  Overview of Results from the Mars 2020 Perseverance Rover’s First Science Campaign [#1798]
We summarize results from Perseverance’s first year at Jezero, including sampling progress and investigations to establish the history of Jezero’s crater floor.

2:30 p.m.

Simon J. I. *   Amundsen H. E. F.   Beegle L. W.   Bell J.   Benison K. C.   et al.

Sampling of Jezero Crater Máaz Formation by Mars 2020 Perseverance Rover [#1294]
Past and potential future sampling of Jezero Crater floor Máaz formation by Mars 2020 Perseverance rover.

2:40 p.m.

Hickman-Lewis K. *   Benison K.   Bosak T.   Cohen B. A.   Czaja A. D.   et al.

Perseverance Rover Sampling Activities at South Séítah, Jezero Crater [#1965]
The Perseverance rover has collected four samples in the Séítah region of Jezero Crater. We discuss the returned sample science potentials of these materials.

2:50 p.m.

Golombek M. *   Williams N.   Grip H.   Tzanetos T.   Balaram J.   et al.

Mars Helicopter, Ingenuity:  Operations and Initial Results [#2156]
Ingenuity has provided synoptic images that have been used to identify sites for in situ exploration, find traversable paths, and improve geologic mapping.

3:00 p.m.

 

Panel Q&A

3:15 p.m.

Horgan B. *   Rice M.   Garczynski B.   Johnson J.   Stack-Morgan K.   et al.

Mineralogy, Morphology, and Geochronological Significance of the Máaz Formation and the Jezero Crater Floor [#1680]
Jezero Crater is filled with igneous units of different ages, so returned samples may allow us to bracket the timing and duration of fluvial activity.

3:25 p.m.

Udry A. *   Sautter V.   Cousin A.   Wiens R. C.   Forni O.   et al.

A Mars 2020 Perseverance SuperCam Perspective on the Igneous Nature of the Máaz Formation at Jezero Crater, Mars [#2257]
The Mars2020 Perseverance rover spent its first 201 sols in the Máaz formation, which shows a basaltic composition and mineralogy according to SuperCam data.

3:35 p.m.

Schmidt M. E. *   Allowed A.   Christian J.   Clark B. C.   Flannery D.   et al.

Highly Differentiated Basaltic Lavas Examined by PIXL in Jezero Crater [#1530]
No lakebed on trail / Grains interlock, iron-rich / Crater floor is flow.

3:45 p.m.

Kizovski T. V. *   Schmidt M. E.   Liu Y.   Clark B. C.   Tice M.   et al.

Minor Minerals Analyzed by PIXL — A Major Part of Igneous Rock Petrogenesis at Jezero Crater [#2384]
This abstract summarizes our analysis of minor mineral phases (specifically oxides and phosphates) at Jezero Crater conducted by the Mars 2020 rover’s PIXL instrument.

3:55 p.m.

 

Panel Q&A

4:10 p.m.

Clavé E. *   Benzerara K.   Beck P.   Meslin P.-Y.   Beyssac O.   et al.

Carbonate Detection with SuperCam in the Jezero Crater, Mars [#2001]
We present an overview of the carbonate detection enabled by the synergy of SuperCam investigation techniques in the Jezero Crater, Mars.

4:20 p.m.

Scheller E. L. *   Razzell Hollis J.   Cardarelli E. L.   Steele A.   Beegle L. W.   et al.

First-Results from the Perseverance SHERLOC Investigation:  Aqueous Alteration Processes and Implications for Organic Geochemistry in Jezero Crater, Mars [#1652]
The SHERLOC instrument on the Perseverance rover observed organic compounds associated with minerals formed by aqueous alteration.

4:30 p.m.

Gupta S. *   Mangold N.   Bell J. F.   Gasnault O.   Dromart G.   et al.

A Delta-Lake System at Jezero Crater (Mars) from Long Distance Observations [#2295]
Long-distance observations of Jezero western fan by Perseverance rover demonstrate that the fan formed a Gilbert-type delta system that prograded into a lake in Jezero Crater.

4:40 p.m.

Sholes S. F. *   Stack K. M.   Kah L. C.   Simon J. I.   Shuster D. L.   et al.

Topographic Trends of the Geologic Units in Jezero Crater:  Lake Levels, Potential Shorelines, and the Crater Floor Units [#2641]
A summary of topographic constraints on Jezero lake levels, the possibility of crater rim shorelines, and modeled surfaces of different crater floor units.

4:50 p.m.

 

Panel Q&A

5:05 p.m.

 

Panel Q&A Final Discussion

5:12 p.m.

 

Session Closure

 

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[M153]

Monday, March 7, 2022
REMOTE ANALYSIS OF RYUGU AND BENNU FROM HAYABUSA2 AND OSIRIS-REX

2:15 p.m.   Waterway Ballroom 5

Chairs:  Hannah Kaplan and Max Hamm

Times

Authors (*Presenter)

Abstract Title and Summary

2:15 p.m.

 

Session Introduction

2:20 p.m.

Ishimaru K. *   Lauretta D. S.   Porter N.   Golish D. R.   Al Asad M. M.   et al.

Modeling of Sediment Deposition on Asteroid Bennu’s Parent Body [#1444]
We investigated layered boulders on Bennu using OSIRIS-REx data. Clast size analysis suggests the layers formed via sequential deposition with distinct settling velocities.

2:30 p.m.

Tang Y. *   Lauretta D. S.   Ballouz R.-L.   DellaGiustina D. N.   Bennett C. A.   et al.

Simulation and Analysis of Mass Movement Events on Asteroid Bennu [#1876]
We conducted simulations of sloping and seismic-shaking-induced granular flow to better understand their mechanisms in mass movement events on Bennu.

2:40 p.m.

Jawin E. R. *   McCoy T. J.   Ryan A. J.   Kaplan H. H.   Ballouz R.-L.   et al.

Boulder Classification on Bennu Based on Morphology and Albedo [#2066]
Bennu’s boulders vary in morphology, albedo, thermal, and spectral properties. These variations may represent distinct formation regions on the parent body.

2:50 p.m.

Breitenfeld L. B. *   Rogers A. D.   Glotch T. D.   Hamilton V. E.   Christensen P. R.   et al.

Finding Unique Thermal Emission Spectra of the Asteroid Bennu Through Machine Learning Model Applications [#1465]
We investigate compositional variations on the asteroid Bennu spatially by applying machine learning models to individual OTES spectra.

3:00 p.m.

 

Panel Q&A

3:15 p.m.

Kaplan H. H. *   Simon A. A.   Reuter D. C.   Hamilton V. E.

Spectral Properties of Dust on Asteroid (101955) Bennu with the OSIRIS-REx Visible and Infrared Spectrometer (OVIRS) [#1167]
New view for OVIRS / Through dusty mirror, clear sight / Of fine grain Bennu.

3:25 p.m.

Hamilton V. E. *   Connolly H. C. Jr.   Goodrich C. A.   Abreu N. M.   Kaplan H. H.   et al.

Type 1 CR Chondrites as Candidate Mineralogical Analogues for (101955) Bennu [#1660]
We describe spectral evidence, suggesting that GRO 95577 (CR1) is a potential analogue for asteroid (101955) Bennu’s bulk surface composition.

3:35 p.m.

Sugita S. *   Yumoto K.   Ebihara T.   Morota T.   Tatsumi E.   et al.

The Representativeness of Ryugu Samples Estimated from Statistical Analysis of Boulder Color Distribution [#1839]
8,077 boulders show that 99% of their reflectance is within ±15% of the average, suggesting that Ryugu is uniform and returned samples are good representatives.

3:45 p.m.

Yumoto K. *   Cho Y.   Yabe Y.   Mori S.   Ogura A.   et al.

Visible Multi-Band Spectra and Specular Reflectivity of Ryugu Returned Samples [#1326]
Multiband spectra of Ryugu samples were measured. A large spectral variation among particles were observed. The reflectance is affected by specular reflections.

3:55 p.m.

 

Panel Q&A

4:10 p.m.

Hamm M. *   Grott M.   Senshu H.   Knollenberg J.   de Wiljes J.   et al.

MASCOT Radiometer Data Reveals Signs of Strong Aqueous Alteration of (162173) Ryugu’s Materials [#1400]
Emissivity estimates within four bands in the mid-infrared data gathered on Ryugu by MARA reveal strong signs of aqueous alteration of the surface material.

4:20 p.m.

Ohsugi A. *   Sakatani N.   Shimaki Y.   Kanamaru M.   Senshu H.   et al.

Analysis of the Temperature Distributions of Boulders on C-Type Asteroid 162173 Ryugu Observed in Low Altitude Operation of the Asteroid Explorer Hayabusa2 [#1183]
To obtain detailed thermal properties of boulders at Ryugu, we analyzed TIR images and investigated temperature variations and their physical states.

4:30 p.m.

Yokota Y. *   Honda R.   Domingue D.   Tatsumi E.   Schröder S. E.   et al.

Regional Photometry of Asteroid Ryugu with Multiple Photometric Models [#2385]
We performed a regional photometric analysis of Ryugu using the Hapke model and Kaasalainen-Shkuratov set of models.

4:40 p.m.

Namiki N. *   Mizuno T.   Senshu H.   Noda H.   Matsumoto K.   et al.

Slope Stability Analysis of Top-Shaped Ryugu [#1882]
The top-shape of Ryugu is simply described by a force balance between traction along slope and friction due to normal force. The angle of repose is between 20 and 25 degrees.

4:50 p.m.

 

Panel Q&A

5:05 p.m.

 

Panel Q&A Final Discussion

5:12 p.m.

 

Session Closure