52nd Lunar and Planetary Science Conference

March 15-19, 2021

 

Program and Abstracts

 

ORAL PROGRAM

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

 

POSTER PROGRAM

iPosters

 

Posters will be displayed in the iPoster gallery in the virtual conference environment. Attendees are encouraged to view posters between oral sessions and during breaks.

 

The meeting is scheduled to begin each day at 11:00 a.m. Central Daylight Time (CDT). For different time zones, use: Time Zone Converter

 

Monday, March 15, 11:00 a.m. CDT

Track 1              Special Session:  Exploring Myriad Ocean Worlds

Track 2              Lunar Magnetism:  Unraveling the History of the Interior of the Moon Through Its Magnetic Properties

Track 3              Presolar Grains, IDPs, Other Early Solar System Materials

Track 4              MSL Curiosity Results I:  Exploration of Glen Torridon

Track 5              Small Body Impacts:  CSI Dimorphos

 

Monday, March 15, 12:30 p.m. CDT

Track 1              Masursky Lecture (Live Presentations)

 

Monday, March 15, 2:30 p.m. CDT

Track 1              Physicochemical Evolution of the Moon

Track 2              Shaken and Stirred:  Interiors of Satellites and Ocean Worlds

Track 3              Protoplanetary Disk Evolution

Track 4              MSL Curiosity Results II:  Exploration of the Greenheugh Pediment, Sulfate Unit, and Beyond

Track 5              Impacts:  Crater Formation Small to Large

 

Monday, March 15, 4:00 p.m. CDT

Track 1              Lunar Space Weathering:  Spectral Studies and Experiments

Track 2              Crack, Boom! Active and Eruptive Satellites and Ocean Worlds

Track 3              Evolution of Parent Bodies:  Accretion, Differentiation, Crystallization, and Bombardment

Track 4              Martian Fluids and Element Mobility

Track 5              Impacts:  Changing Planetary Bodies

 

Tuesday, March 16, 11:00 a.m. CDT

Track 1              Special Session:  Mars 2020 I (Live Presentations)

 

Tuesday, March 16, 12:30 p.m. CDT

Track 1              Special Session:  Mars 2020 II (Live Presentations)

 

Tuesday, March 16, 2:30 p.m. CDT

Track 1              Special Session:  Mars 2020 III (Live Presentations)

Track 2              Endogenous Lunar Volatiles Through Time and Space

Track 3              Calcium-Aluminum-Rich Inclusions in Meteorites

Track 4              Icy Satellites and Ocean Worlds:  Geology and Geophysics

Track 5              Great Balls of Fire:  Explosive Volcanism Across the Solar System

 

Tuesday, March 16, 4:00 p.m. CDT

Track 1              Special Session:  Mars 2020 IV (Live Presentations)

Track 2              Lunar Volatiles Through Remote Sensing, Modeling and Experiments

Track 3              Chondrules:  The Continuing Conundrum

Track 4              Icy and Ocean Worlds:  Compositional Evolution and State

Track 5              Let it Flow:  Lava Flow Dynamics and Emplacement Across the Solar System

 

Wednesday, March 17, 11:00 a.m. CDT

Track 1              Lunar Science for the New Millennium (Live Presentations)

 

Wednesday, March 17, 12:30 p.m. CDT

Track 1              Special Session:  Apollo Next Generation Sample Analysis I:  Fulfilling Apollo Goals and Preparing for Artemis, New Results from Special Apollo Samples

Track 2              Isotopic Reservoirs in the Early Solar System

Track 3              Small Body Spectroscopy:  Composition and Classification

Track 4              Martian Hydrated Minerals and Aqueous Alteration

Track 5              Exoplanets:  Composition and Structure

 

Wednesday, March 17, 2:30 p.m. CDT

Track 1              Special Session:  Apollo Next Generation Sample Analysis II:  Fulfilling Apollo Goals and Preparing for Artemis, New Results from Special Apollo Samples

Track 2              Big Bodies:  Modeling and Measurements of Planetesimals

Track 3              Mercury:  Big Science in a Small Planet

Track 4              Martian Mineralogy from Orbit

Track 5              Atmospheres:  Dynamics, Evolution, and Composition

 

Wednesday, March 17, 4:00 p.m. CDT

Track 1              New Understanding of Mars and Asteroids (Live Presentations)

 

Posters will be displayed in the iPoster gallery in the virtual conference environment. Attendees are encouraged to view posters between oral sessions and during breaks.

 

Thursday, March 18, 11:00 a.m. CDT

Track 1              Surface-Atmosphere Interactions on Icy Worlds:  A Volatile Session

Track 2              Lunar Remote Sensing:  Bad Moon Rising

Track 3              Carbonaceous Chondrites:  Parent Body Processing and Organic Matter

Track 4              Beginnings:  Early Evolution and the Origins of Life

Track 5              InSight Results:  One Martian Year

 

Thursday, March 18, 12:30 p.m. CDT

Track 1              NASA Headquarters Briefing (Live Presentations)

 

Thursday, March 18, 2:30 p.m. CDT

Track 1              Special Session:  Scientific Exploration of the Lunar South Pole I

Track 2              Bennu and Ryugu:  Sample Collection and Return

Track 3              Melts on Differentiated Parent Bodies

Track 4              Early Mars Geomorphology I:  Warm and Wet, Cold and Dry, or Something in Between?

Track 5              Venus:  Geology and Geophysics

 

Thursday, March 18, 4:00 p.m. CDT

Track 1              Special Session:  Scientific Exploration of the Lunar South Pole II

Track 2              Bennu and Ryugu:  Surface Evolution

Track 3              Planetary Differentiation:  Accretion, Evolution, Experiments — Lots of Metal

Track 4              Early Mars Geomorphology II:  Cooler with a Chance of Showers

Track 5              Venus:  Coupled Evolution of the Interior, Surface, and Atmosphere

 

Friday, March 19, 11:00 a.m. CDT

Track 1              High-Impact Lunar Impact Studies

Track 2              Planetary Tectonics and Interiors:  Surface Expressions and Deep Issues

Track 3              The Legacy of Arecibo Observatory in Planetary Science

Track 4              Modern Mars:  Earth, Wind, and Ice

Track 5              Organics:  Early Synthesis and Detection

 

Friday, March 19, 12:30 p.m. CDT

Track 1              Decadal Survey (Live Presentations)

 

Friday, March 19, 2:30 p.m. CDT

Track 1              Lunar Volcanism and Tectonics

Track 2              Small Body Regolith and Interiors:  Laboratory Studies and Modeling

Track 3              Martian Meteorites:  Petrology and Petrogenesis

Track 4              Ice at the Martian Poles

Track 5              Microbes:  Where We Live

 

Friday, March 19, 4:00 p.m. CDT

Track 1              Space Weathering on Airless Planetary Bodies:  Beyond Lunar-Style Space Weathering

Track 2              Small Body Evolution:  Forces of Heat and Light

Track 3              Lunar Geochemistry and Petrology

Track 4              Icy Mars Geomorphology

Track 5              Environments:  Habitability and Organic Preservation

 

iPosters

Posters will be displayed in the iPoster gallery in the virtual conference environment. Attendees are encouraged to view posters between oral sessions and during breaks.

 

Special Session: Apollo Next Generation Sample Analysis:  Artemis

Mars:  Surface and Interior InSights

Mercury:  Big Science in a Small Planet

Special Session:  Scientific Exploration of the Lunar South Pole

Martian Volcanic Landforms

Venus Atmosphere, Emissivity, and Weathering

Lunar Geophysics:  Shake, Rattle, Roll, and Fracture

Analyzing Chondrites and Their Components:  Novel Methods

Venus Volcanism, Tectonics, and Global Evolution

Lunar Petrology and Geochemistry

Carbonaceous Chondrites:  Parent Body Processing and Organic Matter

Venus Instrumentation and Airborne Exploration

Lunar Remote Sensing:  From the Lab to Orbit

Chondrites — Physical Properties and Experiments

Exoplanets

Lunar Surface Interactions with the Space Environment

New Chondrites

Great Balls of Fire:  Explosive Volcanism Across the Solar System

Lunar Volcanism

Characterization, Parent Body Origins, and Petrogenesis of Achondrites

Planetary Volcanism:  Morphologies, Emplacement, and Evolution

Lunar Volatiles

Chondritic Meteorite Melange:  E, O, and C

Planetary Differentiation

Change’4 and Change'5 Results

Martian Meteorites:  Igneous and Surface Processes

Atmospheres:  Dynamics, Evolution, and Composition

Mission Concepts:  Moon

Presolar Grains, IDPs, Genesis, Stardust, Hayabusa

Space Weathering:  Know More, Knowledge Gaps

Mission Concepts:  Earth

Solar Nebular Processes

Astrobiology Analogs:  Chemistry and Fluids

Mission Concepts:  Inner Solar System

Impacts:  Changing Planetary Bodies Beyond Earth

Biomarkers:  How to Find Us

Mission Concepts:  Outer Solar System and Beyond

Impacts:  Finding and Analyzing Earth's Craters

Microbes:  Where We Live

Special Session:  Mars 2020 Initial Results I

Impacts:  Crater Formation and Processes on Earth and Beyond

Astrobiology:  Instrument and Mission Concepts

Special Session:  Mars 2020 Initial Results II

Impacts on the Moon

Analogs:  Mars, the Moon, and More

MSL Curiosity Results

Impacts:  Studying Ejecta on Earth

Intrinsic and Spectroscopic Properties of Analog Materials

Gale Crater Geochemistry

Impacts:  Things Get Shocked  (Shocked Minerals)

Instruments:  Dust, Plume, and Unique

ExoMars

Special Session:  Exploring the Myriad of Ocean Worlds

Instruments:  Orbital and Atmospheric Measurements

Geochemistry:  The Things Microbes Care About

Geology and Geophysics of Satellites and Ocean Worlds

Instruments:  RAMAN and Laser/LIBS

Fans, Deltas, and Lakes on Mars

Crack, Boom! Active and Eruptive Satellites and Ocean Worlds

Instruments:  Surface and Subsurface Measurements

Mars Geomorphology

Surface-Atmosphere Interactions on Icy Worlds:  A Volatile Session

Planetary Spatial Data Infrastructure (PSDI) posters

Modern Mars:  Earth, Wind, and Ice

Shaken and Stirred:  Physical and Compositional State of Satellites and Ocean Worlds

Machine Learning Applied to Planetary Surfaces: "I'm Afraid I CAN Do That!"

Martian Geochemistry

Giant Planets, Rings and Dynamics — Oh My!

A Diverse and Inclusive Workforce:  Who We Are and Can Be

Icy Mars Geomorphology and Geochemistry

Ceres and Vesta

Education and Audience Engagement:  Building Bridges to Audiences

Ice at the Martian Poles

Small Body Observations:  Near and Far

Education and Outreach in a Pandemic:  Pivoting to Virtual Engagement

Martian Hydrated Minerals and Aqueous Alteration

Small Body Surfaces:  Boulders, Craters, and Regolith

Education and Workforce Training:  Preparing the Next Generation

Mars:  Optimizations and Lab Based Studies

Small Body Laboratory Studies and Modeling

 

Mars Sample Return

Small Body Mission Support:  Past, Present, and Future

 

 

 

 

Posters will be displayed in the iPoster gallery in the virtual conference environment. Attendees are encouraged to view posters between oral sessions and during breaks.

 

[M101]

Monday, March 15, 2021
SPECIAL SESSION:  EXPLORING MYRIAD OCEAN WORLDS

11:00 a.m.   Track 1

Chairs:  Samuel Howell and Morgan Cable

Monday Orals

Tuesday Orals

Wednesday Orals

Thursday Orals

Friday Orals

iPosters

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Times

Authors (*Denotes Presenter)

Abstract Title and Summary

11:00 a.m.

 

Presenter Introductions

11:05 a.m.

Cochrane C. J. *   Nordheim T. A.   Vance S. D.   Styczinski M.   Soderlund K.   et al.

In Search of Subsurface Oceans Within the Moons of Uranus [#1559]
This work involves the utilization of magnetic induction for subsurface ocean detection in the moons of Uranus, with an emphasis on Miranda and Ariel.

11:08 a.m.

Hammond N. P. *   Collins G. C.

Intense Geologic Activity on Triton for Billions of Years After Orbital Capture [#2427]
When Triton was captured and heated, its ice shell was nearly deleted. But as ice shells grow small, dissipation rates fall, so its orbital evolution was impeded.

11:11 a.m.

Styczinski M. J. *   Vance S. D.   Cochrane C. J.   Harnett E. M.

Recent Advances in Magnetic Induction from Asymmetric Ocean Worlds [#2728]
Magnetic induction is a powerful tool for probing the interior structure and geophysics of ocean worlds. We have developed analytical methods for extending the technique to arbitrary interiors that include asymmetry expected from gravity, etc.

11:14 a.m.

Mazarico E. *   Buccino D. R.   Castillo-Rogez J.   Dombard A.   Genova A.   et al.

The Europa Clipper Gravity/Radio Science Investigation [#1784]
The Gravity/Radio Science Team for the NASA Europa Clipper was recently selected. We present the science objectives of this investigation.

11:17 a.m.

Hand K. P. *   Phillips C. B.   Maize E.   Reeves G.   Pitesky J.   et al.

Europa Lander Mission Concept (Update 2021) [#2120]
We provide an update and the latest information on the development and technology advances being made for the Europa Lander mission concept, as originally detailed in the 2016 Science Definition Team report.

11:20 a.m.

Sori M. M. *

Does Triton’s Ice Cap Reveal Its Internal Heat and Ocean? [#1011]
Triton’s nitrogen ice is unusually extensive. I show that the ice’s extent may be controlled by viscous flow or basal melting, which yields quantitative constraints on the internal heat that powers Triton’s geological activity.

11:23 a.m.

Schenk P. *   McKinnon W. B.   Moore J.   Nimmo F.

The Topography of Ganymede (and Callisto):  Geology, Global Characteristics, and Future Exploration [#2228]
Ocean world of Ganymede your relief is low / Callisto remains a cypher with subtle deformation / A big giant dome on Ganymede wandered from the pole.

11:26 a.m.

Theiling B. P. *   Da Poian V.   Powell B.

Predicting the Seawater Chemistry of an Ocean World Using Machine Learning on Isotopic Measurements of CO2 [#2261]
We used 848 isotope ratio mass spectra of CO2 that had interacted with ocean worlds-relevant seawaters as a machine learning training dataset. Our algorithm can identify the seawater composition using only data from volatile CO2.

11:29 a.m.

 

Q&A

12:00 p.m.

 

End of Session

 

[M102]

Monday, March 15, 2021
LUNAR MAGNETISM:  UNRAVELING THE HISTORY OF THE INTERIOR OF THE MOON THROUGH ITS MAGNETIC PROPERTIES

11:00 a.m.   Track 2

Chairs:  David Blewett and Emily Martin

Monday Orals

Tuesday Orals

Wednesday Orals

Thursday Orals

Friday Orals

iPosters

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Times

Authors (*Denotes Presenter)

Abstract Title and Summary

11:00 a.m.

 

Presenter Introductions

11:05 a.m.

Hamid S. H. *   O’Rourke J. G.   Soderlund K. M.

A Lunar Dynamo Powered by Core Convection and a Basal Magma Ocean [#2038]
We test the hypothesis that an early basal magma ocean-hosted dynamo in combination with a later thermo-compositional core dynamo driven primarily by inner core solidification may help explain the history of the lunar magnetic field.

11:08 a.m.

Nichols-Fleming F. *   Evans A. J.   Johnson B. C.   Tikoo S. M.

Short-Lived Lunar Dynamos Powered by Accretion of Cold Impactor Core Material [#2177]
We present work showing that the accretion of cool impactor material is able to power short-lived lunar magnetic fields. Field strengths within the first few days can reach 40–120 µT, comparable to the high-intensity era of the lunar paleorecord.

11:11 a.m.

Hood L. L. *   Torres C. B.   Oliveira J. S.   Wieczorek M. A.   Stewart S. T.

A New Large-Scale Map of the Lunar Crustal Magnetic Field and Its Interpretation [#1628]
The observed distribution of anomalies is consistent with the hypothesis that iron from the Imbrium impactor was mixed into ejecta that was inhomogeneously deposited downrange in groups aligned radial to the basin and concentrated antipodal to it.

11:14 a.m.

Jung J. *   Tikoo S. M.   Gattacceca J.   Lepaulard C.

Shock Demagnetization Does Not Fully Explain Variations in the Lunar Paleointensity Record [#2388]
We evaluated the effects of shock demagnetization on the lunar paleointensity record by conducting hydrostatic pressure experiments (up to 1.8 GPa) on seven Apollo samples.

11:17 a.m.

Strauss B. E. *   Tikoo S. M.

Magnetic Domain Behavior and Interpretation in Apollo Samples [#2301]
We present a case study of Apollo 12 basalts to assess the determining factors for magnetic fidelity in lunar rocks and address fundamental questions about magnetic mineralogy and domain behavior.

11:20 a.m.

Seritan M. R. K. *   Garrick-Bethell I.

Modeling Thermal Demagnetization at the Lunar Swirl Reiner Gamma [#1811]
Modeled dome, heat flow, / and magnets. Does the swirl fade? / Hard to tell. Perhaps.

11:23 a.m.

Bhatt M. *   Wöhler C.   Aravind K.   Ganesh S.   Bharadwaj A.

Regolith Characteristics of the Reiner Gamma Swirl as Revealed by Polarimetric Observations [#2430]
Based on telescopic polarimetric analysis, we found that the regolith properties of Reiner Gamma are different from those of its surroundings and the examined crater ray systems.

11:26 a.m.

Pieters C. M. *   Donaldson Hanna K. L.   Sunshine J. M.   Garrick-Bethell I.

New M-Cube Insights on the Character of the Mysterious Reiner Gamma Swirls [#1686]
More Moon mysteries / To unlock up close at swirls / Through soil properties.

11:29 a.m.

 

Q&A

12:00 p.m.

 

End of Session

 

[M103]

Monday, March 15, 2021                                                    
PRESOLAR GRAINS, IDPS, OTHER EARLY SOLAR SYSTEM MATERIALS

11:00 a.m.   Track 3

Chairs:  Thomas Stephan and Zack Gainsforth

Monday Orals

Tuesday Orals

Wednesday Orals

Thursday Orals

Friday Orals

iPosters

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Times

Authors (*Denotes Presenter)

Abstract Title and Summary

11:00 a.m.

 

Presenter Introductions

11:05 a.m.

Meyer B. S. *   Bermingham K. R.   Frizzell K.   Mezger K.

NRLEE Nucleosynthesis [#2598]
NRLEEs are likely some sort of exploding white dwarf stars. They produce neutron-rich iron-group isotopes like 48Ca and 50Ti and possibly 84Sr and 96Zr, and are probably important contributors to the solar system’s initial building blocks.

11:08 a.m.

Liu N. *   Barosch J.   Nittler L. R.   Alexander C. M. O’D.   Wang J.   et al.

Multielement Isotopic Compositions of Presolar SiC from Asymptotic Giant Branch Stars [#2347]
Our new NanoSIMS data for MS/Y SiC suggest that the N and Al isotope data in the literature suffer from varying degrees of contamination and that high-resolution isotope imaging and extensive sputtering are effective in suppressing the contamination.

11:11 a.m.

Hoppe P. *   Schofield J.   Pignatari M.   Amari S.

A Presolar Silicon Carbide Grain of Type C with Extremely Low 12C/13C Ratio [#1055]
We report on a presolar SiC grain of Type C with an extremely low 12C/13C ratio of 1.0 and strong enrichments in the heavy Si isotopes. The isotopic compositions can be satisfactorily explained by an H ingestion supernova model.

11:14 a.m.

Singerling S. A. *   Liu N.   Nittler L. R.   Alexander C. M. O’D.   Stroud R. M.

TEM Studies of Presolar SiC Grains:  Insights into Circumstellar Conditions and Implications for IR Spectroscopy [#1687]
SiC stardust / Captures range in conditions / Complex histories.

11:17 a.m.

Nguyen A. N. *   Mane P.   Ross D. K.   Simon J. I.

Presolar Grain Abundance Variation in the Miller Range 090019 CO3.1 Chondrite [#2709]
We determine a presolar O-rich grain abundance of 99ppm in MIL 090019 CO3.1. One matrix region has a low presolar O-rich grain abundance of 28ppm, indicating localized alteration. The presolar C-rich grain abundance (64ppm) did not vary with region.

11:20 a.m.

Joswiak D. J. *   Brownlee D. E.   Zhang M.   Westphal A. J.   Gainsforth Z.   et al.

Origin of low-Ca Pyroxenes in Comet Samples:  Evidence for Igneous Formation in the Nebula Like Chondrules [#1604]
Minor elements in low-Ca pyroxenes from comet Wild 2 and a giant cluster IDP along with O isotopes suggest that comet grains formed in diverse igneous nebular environments like chondrules and are not fragments of thermally altered parent bodies.

11:23 a.m.

Zhang M. *   Defouilloy C.   Joswiak D. J.   Brownlee D. E.   Nakashima D.   et al.

Oxygen Isotope Systematics of Crystalline Silicates in a Giant Cluster IDP:  A Genetic Link to Wild 2 Particles and Primitive Chondrite Chondrules [#1685]
We report the oxygen isotope ratios of 20 crystalline silicate particles from the giant cluster IDP U2-20GCA and discuss their genetic relationships with Wild 2 particles and primitive chondrite chondrules.

11:26 a.m.

Keller L. P. *   Snead C. J.

Oxygen Isotopic Compositions of Hydrated Interplanetary Dust Particles:  Implications for Aqueous Alteration in Outer Solar System Objects [#2389]
We obtained high precision O isotopic compositions for hydrated IDPs and show that they are distinct from known carbonaceous chondrite groups.

11:29 a.m.

 

Q&A

12:00 p.m.

 

End of Session

 

[M104]

Monday, March 15, 2021                                                    
MSL CURIOSITY RESULTS I:  EXPLORATION OF GLEN TORRIDON

11:00 a.m.   Track 4

Chairs:  Cherie Achilles and Candice Bedford

Monday Orals

Tuesday Orals

Wednesday Orals

Thursday Orals

Friday Orals

iPosters

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Times

Authors (*Denotes Presenter)

Abstract Title and Summary

11:00 a.m.

 

Presenter Introductions

11:05 a.m.

Fox V. K. *   Bennett K. A.   Bryk A. B.   Arvidson R. E.   Fedo C.   et al.

Contextualizing CRISM Observations of the Clay-Bearing Glen Torridon Region with the Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity Rover [#2765]
Correlations between rover and orbital observations of clay minerals Glen Torridon, Gale Crater.

11:08 a.m.

Thorpe M. T. *   Bristow T. F.   Rampe E. B.   Grotzinger J. P.   Fox V. K.   et al.

The Mineralogy and Sedimentary History of the Glen Torridon Region, Gale Crater, Mars [#1519]
The identification of the most phyllosilicate-rich samples to date and novel mineral detections for CheMin in Glen Torridon suggests a rich sedimentary history.

11:11 a.m.

Cousin A. *   Desjardins M.   Dehouck E.   Forni O.   David G.   et al.

K-Rich Rubbly Bedrock at Glen Torridon, Gale Crater, Mars:  Investigating the Possible Presence of Illite [#2127]
Rubbly bedrock sampled by Curiosity at Glen Torridon, Mars are enriched in K2O. Glen Torridon is clay-rich from orbital data. We investigate if this K enrichment could be due to the presence of illite from ChemCam data, as no drill has been done.

11:14 a.m.

Gasda P. J. *   Comellas J.   Essunfeld A.   Das D.   Nellessen M.   et al.

The Chemistry and Morphology of Diagenetic Features in Glen Torridon, Gale Crater [#1271]
Ancient Mars groundwater / Left behind elements galore / Clues for multiple events?

11:17 a.m.

Rudolph A. *   Horgan B.   Johnson J. R.   Bell J. F. III   Bennett K.   et al.

Diagenesis in the Glen Torridon Region of Gale Crater, Mars Using VNIR Spectral Data from Curiosity Rover [#1502]
Diagenesis / Highlights complex history / Of water and rocks.

11:20 a.m.

Khan S. Y. *   Stack K. M.   Yingst R. A.

Characterization of Clasts in the Glen Torridon Region Observed by the MSL Curiosity Rover [#2649]
Identifying / Erosional history / Glen Torridon clasts.

11:23 a.m.

Hughes M. N. *   Arvidson R. E.   Fraeman A. A.   VanBommel S. J.

Characteristics of the Fractured Intermediate Unit from Orbital and Curiosity-Based Data [#1586]
A geomorphic map has been created over Glen Torridon in Gale Crater. The compositions of the geomorphic units, including the Fractured Intermediate Unit (FIU) and FIU-rubbly, are compared using a correspondence analysis of APXS measurements.

11:26 a.m.

O’Connell-Cooper C. D. *   Thompson L. M.   Gellert R.   Spray J. G.   Boyd N. I.   et al.

APXS Geochemistry of the Fractured Intermediate Unit (fIU) — Its Relationship to Underlying Glen Torridon Units and Overlying Pediment Rocks at the Greenheugh Unconformity [#2405]
MSL-APXS (Glen Torridon) — typical fractured Intermediate Unit (fIU) and altered fIU_Hutton. Increasing diagenesis with elevation, esp. at contact with Greenheugh unconformity. Compositional trends distinct from lower GT (Jura, Knockfarril Hill mbrs).

11:29 a.m.

 

Q&A

12:00 p.m.

 

End of Session

 

[M105]

Monday, March 15, 2021                                                    
SMALL BODY IMPACTS:  CSI DIMORPHOS

11:00 a.m.   Track 5

Chairs:  Michael Nolan and Elena Dobrică

Monday Orals

Tuesday Orals

Wednesday Orals

Thursday Orals

Friday Orals

iPosters

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Times

Authors (*Denotes Presenter)

Abstract Title and Summary

11:00 a.m.

 

Presenter Introductions

11:05 a.m.

Sunday C. *   Murdoch N.   Drilleau M.   Wilhelm A.   Michel P.

Low-Velocity Collision Dynamics on Earth vs. Small-Bodies [#1913]
We examine how low-velocity impacts into granular surfaces differ between 1g and low-g environments. We present the results from experimental and numerical tests, and investigate the suitability of the Froude number for describing these collisions.

11:08 a.m.

Sánchez D. P. *   Scheeres D. J.

Seismic Waves in the Asteroid Environment — Impactor Momentum [#1850]
We simulate impact generated seismic waves in granular media under extremely low pressure. This mimics the conditions in the interior of asteroids. We find that the wave induced pressure depends on the momentum of the impactor.

11:11 a.m.

Nishiyama G. *   Kawamura T.   Fernando B.   Leng K.   Onodera K.   et al.

A New Model of Seismicity on Asteroids Implied by the SCI Experiment of the Hayabusa2 Mission:  Insights from the Existence of Boulders Perched on Other Boulders [#1819]
The boulders on other boulders on Ryugu are hard to survive through strong seismic events and indicate that the seismicity is lower than expected. By modeling seismic wave propagation, we show the intensive scattering limits the seismicity.

11:14 a.m.

Daly R. T. *   Bierhaus E. B.   Barnouin O. S.   Daly M. G.   Seabrook J. A.   et al.

Mound Craters on Rubble-Pile Bennu Indicate Strength at Depth [#1098]
A few craters on Bennu contain mounds in their interiors. We use them to gain insight into Bennu’s subsurface. Mound craters are one of several lines of evidence that suggest the properties of Bennu’s interior differ from those of its surface.

11:17 a.m.

Benavidez P. G. *   Campo Bagatin A.   Liu P. Y.   Richardson D. C.

Reaction of Dimorphos’ Structure to the DART Impact [#2041]
Here we report on results regarding to the effects of the DART impact on Dimorphos’ structure including changes in its spin period and direction of the spin axis, as well as change of its shape. Moreover, we look at the velocity field of surface.

11:20 a.m.

Rossi A. *   Tsiganis K.   Gaitanas M.   Lucchetti A.   Ivanovski S.   et al.

Dynamics of Ejecta in the Didymos-Dimorphos Binary:  Sensitivity to the System Parameters [#1404]
The dynamics of the ejecta from the impact of the DART spacecraft against the asteroid Dimorphos is studied to characterize the crater evolution and the evolution of the particles within the binary system on different time scales.

11:23 a.m.

Güldemeister N. *   Moreau J.   Kohout T.   Wünnemann K.

Insight into the Distribution of High Pressure Shock Metamorphism in Rubble-Pile Asteroids [#1339]
Collisions onto rubble-pile asteroids have been investigated using numerical simulations in order to quantify shock metamorphism (shock darkening) in the asteroid and ejecting material.

11:26 a.m.

Kohout T. *   Petrova E.   Yakovlev G.   Grokhovsky V.   Penttilä A.   et al.

Experimental Constraints on the Ordinary Chondrite Shock Darkening Caused by Asteroid Collisions [#1588]
Shock darkening is caused by two distinct mechanisms with characteristic pressure regions, which are separated by an interval where the darkening ceases. This implies a reduced amount of shock-darkened material produced during the asteroid collisions.

11:29 a.m.

 

Q&A

12:00 p.m.

 

End of Session

 

[M121]

Monday, March 15, 2021                                                    
MASURSKY LECTURE (LIVE PRESENTATIONS)

12:30 p.m.   Track 1

Monday Orals

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Abstract Title and Summary

12:30 p.m.

 

John Grotzinger

 

The Early Aqueous Environment of Mars Inferred from Mission Lifetime Results by the Curiosity Rover at Gale Crater

John Grotzinger is the Ted and Ginger Jenkins Chair Professor of Geology, and the Division Chair for Geological and Planetary Sciences at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). He received his B.Sc. from Hobart College, M.Sc. from the University of Montana, Ph.D. from Virginia Tech, and was a postdoctoral fellow at Columbia University. Prior to moving to Caltech in 2005, he spent 18 years as a member of the faculty at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he was the Robert Shrock Professor of Geology. At Caltech his research group studies the co-evolution of surficial environments on Earth and Mars. Field mapping studies are the starting point for more topical laboratory-based studies involving geochemical, geologic, and geochronological techniques. He served as the Project Scientist for the Mars Curiosity Rover mission from 2007 to 2015 and now serves as the strategic path planner. He was a participating scientist on the Mars Exploration Rover and HiRISE teams, and is a Co-I on the 2020 rover team.

 

 

1:30 p.m.

 

End of Session

 

[M151]

Monday, March 15, 2021                                                    
PHYSICOCHEMICAL EVOLUTION OF THE MOON

2:30 p.m.   Track 1

Chairs:  Paul Warren and Nicole Lunning

Monday Orals

Tuesday Orals

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Thursday Orals

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Times

Authors (*Denotes Presenter)

Abstract Title and Summary

2:30 p.m.

 

Presenter Introductions

2:35 p.m.

Downey B. G. *   Nimmo F.   Matsuyama I.

Early Dynamical Evolution of the Moon with a Subsurface Magma Ocean [#2481]
We recreate the thermal-orbital history of the Moon incorporating magma ocean tides, Cassini state transitions, and an evolving Laplace plane. We arrive at the present state with rapid outwards motion so the magma ocean survives at large distances.

2:38 p.m.

Baker E. *   Wood B.   Wade J.

Crystallisation of a Model Silicate Moon [#2209]
An experimental stepwise crystallization of a pyrolitic lunar magma ocean. Experimental crystal and liquid phases are remelted and recombined to produce the composition the mare basalts and the ferroan anorthosite suite, including REE profiles.

2:41 p.m.

Schwinger S. *   Breuer D.

Determination of the Bulk Silicate Moon FeO Content from Petrological and Geophysical Models [#2089]
We determined the bulk silicate Moon FeO content by combining models of magma ocean solidification and mantle convection with observational constraints on the stratigraphy, bulk Moon density, and moment of inertia from seismic and selenodetic data.

2:44 p.m.

Dygert N. *   Ji D.   Fagan A. L.   Neal C. R.   Draper D. S.   et al.

Petrogenesis of and Subsolidus Reequilibration Within Lunar Ferroan Anorthosites:  Two Demonstrations of a New fO2-Dependent Model for Plagioclase-Melt Europium Partitioning [#2352]
An fO2-dependent plag-melt Eu partitioning model is used to evaluate compositions of lunar anorthites in the context of LMO solidification, and to explore subsolidus reequilibration in an impactite with positive and negative Eu anomalies.

2:47 p.m.

Elardo S. M. *   Astudillo Manoslava D. F.

Ancient Igneous Differentiation Trends in the Moon’s Crust Can Be Produced by Secondary Magmatism from a Common Source [#2313]
Using crystallization modeling, we show that some lunar magnesian anorthosites and FANs may be products of secondary magmatism rather than the LMO.

2:50 p.m.

Krein S. B. *   Guenther M. E.   Grove T. L.

Source Regions of the Lunar Ultramafic Glasses Constrained by Experiments and Models [#2483]
We successfully correct 20 suites of highly compositionally variable lunar ultramafic glasses to three groups of primary magmas (high-Ti, green glass, very low titanium). The high-Ti primary magma must be derived from a hybridized source.

2:53 p.m.

Yen C. J.-K. *   Carpenter P. K.   Couvy H.   Irving A. J.   Krawczynski M. J.   et al.

Characterization, Modeling, and Experimental Petrology of Picritic Green Glass in Northwest Africa 12384:  Probing the Lunar Mantle [#2285]
From beads in the probe / To numbers and molten drops / Liquid line descends.

2:56 p.m.

Guenther M. E. *   Brown Krein S.   Grove T. L.

The Influence of Variable Oxygen Fugacity on the Source Depths for Lunar High-Titanium Ultramafic Glasses [#2450]
We explore the influence of variable oxygen fugacity on the phase relations of the lunar ultramafic glasses. New phase diagrams are presented for the Apollo 17 Orange, 15 Red, and 14 Black glasses and we discuss the role of TiO2 on phase relations.

2:59 p.m.

 

Q&A

3:30 p.m.

 

End of Session

 

[M152]

Monday, March 15, 2021                                                    
SHAKEN AND STIRRED:  INTERIORS OF SATELLITES AND OCEAN WORLDS

2:30 p.m.   Track 2

Chairs:  Lea Bonnefoy and William McKinnon

Monday Orals

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Times

Authors (*Denotes Presenter)

Abstract Title and Summary

2:30 p.m.

 

Presenter Introductions

2:35 p.m.

Weiss B. P. *   Biersteker J. B.   Colicci V.   Couch A.   Petropoulos A.   et al.

Searching for Subsurface Oceans on the Moons of Uranus Using Magnetic Induction [#2096]
Spacecraft magnetic induction measurements could detect and characterize subsurface oceans on the major moons of Uranus.

2:38 p.m.

Denton C. A. *   Johnson B. C.   Wakita S.   Freed A. M.   Melosh H. J.   et al.

Antipodal Terrains Produced by Sputnik Planitia-Forming Impact Imply Pluto Has a Thick Ocean and Hydrated Core [#1078]
We use seismic waves generated by the formation of the Sputnik Planitia impact basin to constrain Pluto’s internal structure.

2:41 p.m.

Gyalay S. *   Nimmo F.

Insights Into Io’s Interior as Inferred from Its Long-Wavelength Topography [#1820]
Carved by tidal heat / Does Io’s shape then imply / A magma ocean?

2:44 p.m.

Abrahams J. N. H. *   Nimmo F.   Garrick-Bethell I.   Bills B. G.   Bierson C. J.

Long Period Non-Synchronous Rotation of Io [#1573]
One spin per orbit:  / A dance throughout the cosmos. / Maybe not Io?

2:47 p.m.

Kervazo M. *   Tobie G.   Choblet G.   Dumoulin C.   B?hounková M.

Inferring Io’s Interior from Tidal Monitoring [#2460]
Io’s spectacular heat flux is due to extreme tidal heating. We calculate the tidal response of Io’s interior for various distribution of melt within the mantle, to discriminate them in future tidal monitoring.

2:50 p.m.

Behounkova M. *   Tobie G.   Choblet G.   Kervazo M.   Melwani Daswani M.   et al.

Tidally-Induced Magmatic Pulses on the Oceanic Floor of Jupiter’s Moon Europa [#1880]
The melting of Europa’s mantle is investigated by 3D modeling of heat transfer. We show that melt can be produced during most of Europa’s history due to the limited efficiency of internal cooling and the presence of radiogenic and tidal heating.

2:53 p.m.

Biersteker J. B. *   Weiss B. P.   Cochrane C.   Harris C. D. K.   Jia X.   et al.

Revealing the Internal Structure of Europa with a Bayesian Approach to Magnetic Induction Studies [#2654]
We present a new Bayesian approach for inverting magnetic measurements to determine the internal structures of planetary bodies. We then employ this technique to estimate the ability of the Europa Clipper Magnetometer to probe Europa’s interior.

2:56 p.m.

Hay H. C. F. C. *   Fenty I.   Pappalardo R. T.

How Do Convective and Tidal Dynamics Interact in Europa’s Subsurface Ocean? [#2147]
Beneath the ice, heat / And tides swirl the ocean. / How do they couple?

2:59 p.m.

 

Q&A

3:30 p.m.

 

End of Session

 

[M153]

Monday, March 15, 2021                                                    
PROTOPLANETARY DISK EVOLUTION

2:30 p.m.   Track 3

Chairs:  Andrew Westphal and Maitrayee Bose

Monday Orals

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Times

Authors (*Denotes Presenter)

Abstract Title and Summary

2:30 p.m.

 

Presenter Introductions

2:35 p.m.

Miyazaki Y. *   Korenaga J.

Dynamic Evolution of Major Element Chemistry in Protoplanetary Disks [#2469]
Based on a new thermochemical evolution model of protoplanetary disks, we show that planetesimals with depletion patterns similar to ordinary and enstatite chondrites can originate at 1–2 AU outside where enstatite evaporates.

2:38 p.m.

Sengupta D. *   Cuzzi J. N.   Estrada P. E.   Humayun M.

Depletion of Moderately Volatile Elements by Open-System Loss in Early Solar Nebula [#2766]
We investigate the problem of depletion of the moderately volatile elements in the inner solar system objects in order to constrain the physical processes active in the early solar nebula.

2:41 p.m.

Vacher L. G. *   Olgiore R. C.   Jones C.   Liu N.   Fike D. A.

Photochemical Processing by Nearby Stars Recorded in Sulfur Isotopes of Cosmic Symplectite [#2345]
Here we measured the S isotopic composition of cosmic symplectite (COS) in the primitive carbonaceous chondrite Acfer 094 and show that COS recorded large mass-independent S isotope anomaly, consistent with UV photolysis by massive nearby stars.

2:44 p.m.

Barnett M. N. *   Ciesla F. J.

Chemical Processing of Solids Encountering Forming Giant Planet Cores [#2617]
Forming young giant planets / Heat their surroundings / Solids lose precious ices.

2:47 p.m.

Borlina C. S. *   Weiss B. P.   Bryson J. F. J.   Lima E. A.   Bai X.

Evidence for Non-steady Accretion in the Solar Nebula Inferred from Paleomagnetism of CO Chondrules [#2546]
Our paleomagnetic study with chondrules from carbonaceous chondrites supports the presence in the early solar system of magnetic inhomogeneities, associated with the formation of a disk substructure, or variations in the accretion rate over time.

2:50 p.m.

Fu R. R. *   Volk M. W. R.   Bilardello D.   Libourel G.   Lesur G.   et al.

The Fine-Scale Magnetic History of the Allende Meteorite:  Implications for the Structure of the SolarNebula [#2727]
Magnetization in Allende is carried exclusively by Fe-sulfides, supporting an early chemical origin. The magnetization may have recorded nebular fields, suggesting heterogeneity in disk properties in the outer disk.

2:53 p.m.

Smith R. L. *   Boogert A. C. A.   Blake G. A.   Pontoppidan K. M.

Observations of Carbon Monoxide Variability in Massive Young Stellar Environments and Implications for Nebular Reservoirs [#2712]
Variability in CO abundances and isotope ratios in 12C/13C and 13CO/C18O are observed in massive YSOs as part of a new IRTF-iSHELL study in protoplanetary environments. These findings suggest heterogeneity and/or variability in nebular reservoirs.

2:56 p.m.

Carter P. J. *   Stewart S. T.

Collision Fragments as a Chemically Similar Source for Late Accretion [#2288]
Young Earth’s leftovers / Look chemically alike / So late impacts match.

2:59 p.m.

 

Q&A

3:30 p.m.

 

End of Session

 

[M154]

Monday, March 15, 2021                                                    
MSL CURIOSITY RESULTS II:  EXPLORATION OF THE GREENHEUGH PEDIMENT, SULFATE UNIT, AND BEYOND

2:30 p.m.   Track 4

Chairs:  Kirsten Siebach and John Grant

Monday Orals

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Times

Authors (*Denotes Presenter)

Abstract Title and Summary

2:30 p.m.

 

Presenter Introductions

2:35 p.m.

Banham S. G. *   Gupta S.   Bryk A. B.   Rubin D. M.   Edgett K. S.   et al.

Reconstruction of Aeolian Palaeoenvironments and Past Climate Events at the Greenheugh Pediment, Aeolis Mons, Mars [#2300]
A whimsical wind / Moved sediment back and forth / While Mount Sharp took form.

2:38 p.m.

Thompson L. M. *   Yen A. S.   O’Connell-Cooper C. D.   Berger J. A.   Gellert R.   et al.

APXS-Derived Compositions of Greenheugh Pediment Capping Rock and Immediately Underlying Murray Formation:  Implications [#2411]
APXS composition of pediment caprock and underlying mudstone has implications for:  1) provenance, transport, and sorting of pediment caprock  2) diagenesis/alteration of caprock and mudstones, and 3) relationships with units previously encountered.

2:41 p.m.

Bedford C. C. *   Banham S.   Bowden D.   Bridges J. C.   Smith R.   et al.

Identifying Ancient Dune Processes in the Stimson Formation of Gale Crater Using Geochemical Data from ChemCam:  New Insights from the Greenheugh Capping Unit [#1569]
Wind blown sand now stone / Preserved at Greenheugh on Mars / What does ChemCam show?

2:44 p.m.

McAdam A. C. *   Sutter B.   Archer P. D.   Franz H. B.   Eigenbrode J. L.   et al.

Investigation of the Glen Torridon Clay-Bearing Unit and Overlying Greenheugh Pediment by the Sample Analysis at Mars Instrument Suite [#2337]
SAM results suggest that Glen Torridon and Greenheugh Pediment rocks experienced a complex depositional and diagenetic history involving alteration episodes with fluids of varying pH and chemical composition, and with variable fluid-to-rock ratios.

2:47 p.m.

Achilles C. N. *   Morris R. V.   Rampe E. B.   Gabriel T. S. J.   Ming D. W.   et al.

Factors Influencing the Formation and Preservation of X-Ray Amorphous Materials Identified in Sedimentary Deposits at Gale Crater, Mars [#2216]
The amorphous fraction of Gale Crater sedimentary deposits demonstrate diverse detrital sources and alteration histories, and amorphous chemistries can discriminate minimal and more extensive alteration events.

2:50 p.m.

Rapin W. *   Dromart G.   Rubin D.   Le Deit L.   Le Mouélic S.   et al.

First Insight on Depositional Environments Recorded in the “Clay-Sulfate” Transition at Gale Crater [#1479]
First detailed images of the sulfate-bearing unit strata in Gale Crater from the ground unveil new models on Hesperian climatic changes and paleoenvironments.

2:53 p.m.

Arvidson R. E. *

Gale Crater:  Curiosity Rover and the Candidate Basal Sulfate Unit [#1192]
The Curiosity Mars rover will soon ascend onto basal sulfate-bearing strata that have unique spectral properties indicative of hydrated sulfate and amorphous phases, combined with relatively low concentrations of iron oxides.

2:56 p.m.

Weitz C. M. *   Bishop J. L.   Thomson B. J.   Seelos K. D.   Lewis K.   et al.

Observations of the Marker Bed at Gale Crater with Recommendations for Future Exploration by the Curiosity Rover [#1484]
We believe the most plausible explanations for the marker bed include:  (1) a more indurated sulfate unit relative to the less indurated sulfates above/below it, (2) a sandstone, or (3) a volcanic ash deposit laid down while the sulfates formed.

2:59 p.m.

 

Q&A

3:30 p.m.

 

End of Session

 

[M155]

Monday, March 15, 2021                                                    
IMPACTS:  CRATER FORMATION SMALL TO LARGE

2:30 p.m.   Track 5

Chairs:  Nicolle Zellner and Robert Citron

Monday Orals

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Authors (*Denotes Presenter)

Abstract Title and Summary

2:30 p.m.

 

Presenter Introductions

2:35 p.m.

Anderson J. L. B. *   Cintala M. L.   Cline C. J.   Dechant L. E.   Taitano R. A.   et al.

Impacts into a Strength-Layered Target:  The Time Evolution of the Excavation-Stage Flow [#1023]
Experimental impacts in strength-layered targets (loose sand over a strong substrate) show complex ejecta patterns:  A typical ejecta curtain as well as high-angle ejecta near the impact point. We trace the time evolution of this excavation-stage flow.

2:38 p.m.

Cline C. J. II *   Cintala M. J.

Experimentally Isolating the Effects of Density and Porosity on Impact Craters [#1034]
Crater measurement / Density, porosity / Unforeseen control.

2:41 p.m.

Ormö J. *   Raducan S. D.   Luther R.   Herreros M. I.   Collins G. S.   et al.

Influence of Target Heterogeneity on Crater Formation:  Insight from Laboratory and Numerical Studies [#1965]
We compare numerical models with impact experiments into targets with three different structures (homogeneous, layered, and heterogeneous) in support of the DART/Hera asteroid deflection experiment.

2:44 p.m.

De Marchi L. *   Agrawal V.   King D. T. Jr.   Ormö J.

Numerical and Experimental Analysis of Wetumpka Impact Crater, with Focus on the Southern Rim [#2217]
In this study, we perform numerical simulations of the formation of Wetumpka Crater with focus on the southern collapsed rim. We explore the effects of different input parameters such as impact speed, target water depth, and sediment thickness.

2:47 p.m.

Zhang Y. *   Jutzi M.   Michel P.   Raducan S. D.   Arakawa M.

A Hybrid SPH-SSDEM Framework for End-to-End Impact Cratering Modeling [#1974]
With a combination of the SPH and the SSDEM, we developed a novel hybrid framework to achieve self-consistent and high-efficiency end-to-end impact cratering modeling. The concept of this framework and validation tests are presented.

2:50 p.m.

Raducan S. D. *   Jutzi M.

Global Scale Deformations Caused by the DART Impact:  Insights to the Collisional Evolution of Small Asteroids [#1900]
Do small asteroids / Deform when fast impacts hit? / SPH can tell.

2:53 p.m.

Davison T. M. *   Collins G. S.

Complex Crater Formation by Oblique Impacts on the Earth and Moon [#1549]
Complex craters from / Oblique incidence impacts / Are larger than thought.

2:56 p.m.

Ding M. *   Zhu M.-H.

Crustal Annulus of Impact Basins Controlled by Regional Thermal State of the Moon [#1097]
We recognize that the PKT impact basins show no crustal annulus that commonly exists for the FHT basins. We attribute the different crustal annulus to regional thermal state and use impact dynamic and viscoelastic models to test this hypothesis.

2:59 p.m.

 

Q&A

3:30 p.m.

 

End of Session

 

[M161]

Monday, March 15, 2021                                                    
LUNAR SPACE WEATHERING:  SPECTRAL STUDIES AND EXPERIMENTS

4:00 p.m.   Track 1

Chairs:  Timothy Glotch and David Trang

Monday Orals

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Authors (*Denotes Presenter)

Abstract Title and Summary

4:00 p.m.

 

Presenter Introductions

4:05 p.m.

Denevi B. W. *   Yasanayake C. N.   Jolliff B. L.   Lawrence S. J.   Hiroi T.   et al.

The Spectral Properties of Lunar Agglutinates [#2368]
Apollo soils still surprise. It’s the agglutinates that are red. The rest is more blue.

4:08 p.m.

Stockstill-Cahill K. R. *   Cahill J. T. S.   Hibbitts C. A.   Livi K. J. T.   Waller D. C.

Ultraviolet Characterization of Fe-impregnated Silica Gels as Analogs for Lunar Space Weathering [#1978]
UV reflectance / Behaves differently from Vis / Small iron brightens.

4:11 p.m.

Sorokin E. M. *   Yakovlev O. I.   Slyuta E. N.   Gerasimov M. V.   Zaitsev M. A.   et al.

Laser Experimental Modeling of the Formation of Nanophase Iron (np-Fe0) [#1975]
As a result of a laser experiment on irradiation of three types of samples, spherules of nanophase iron (np-Fe0) were obtained and described. A mechanism of their formation as a result of thermoreduction and during the passage of a shock wave is proposed.

4:14 p.m.

Lunning N. G. *   Gross J.

Impact Production of Silicon-Bearing Iron-Nickel Metal:  A Widely Occurring Process on the Moon? [#2225]
A handful of discoveries over the last decade of Si-bearing FeNi alloys in lunar samples — including our work on lunar feldspathic breccia Northwest Africa 11303 — have prompted this evaluation of how these alloys form.

4:17 p.m.

Ishii H. A.   Ciston J.   Bradley J. P.  *   Ohtaki K. K.   Gillis-Davis J. J.

Detection of Volatiles in Space Weathered Surfaces [#2315]
Detection of radiolytic -OH/H2O by EELS in space-weathered IDP surfaces but not mature lunar soil suggests efficient steady-state desorption from lunar regolith.

4:20 p.m.

Hicks L. J. *   Bridges J. C.   Noguchi T.   Hidaka H.   Piercy J. D.   et al.

XANES and EELS Identification of Fe-Redox Variation in Space Weathered Apollo 17 Lunar Surface Soil [#2190]
Fe-K XANES and EELS analyses have shown increased oxidation in the space-weathered surfaces compared to the host grain mineralogy in Apollo 17 lunar surface soil sample grains.

4:23 p.m.

Jordan A. P. *

Reevaluating How Charged Particles Cause Space Weathering on the Moon [#1270]
Experiments that simulate space weathering by charged particles usually use fluxes and fluences that are known to cause dielectric breakdown. This has implications for our understanding of space weathering on the Moon.

4:26 p.m.

Shusterman M. L. *   Sharp T. G.   Robinson M. S.

Dielectric Breakdown Weathering:  Morphological Effects of Electrical Breakdown in Laboratory-Irradiated San Carlos Olivine [#2141]
Dielectric breakdown in laboratory-irradiated San Carlos olivine yielded alterations resembling features of weathered grains typically attributed to solar wind exposure and micrometeorites bombardment.

4:29 p.m.

 

Q&A

5:00 p.m.

 

End of Session

 

[M162]

Monday, March 15, 2021                                                    
CRACK, BOOM! ACTIVE AND ERUPTIVE SATELLITES AND OCEAN WORLDS

4:00 p.m.   Track 2

Chairs:  Paul Schenk and Jennifer Scully

Monday Orals

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Times

Authors (*Denotes Presenter)

Abstract Title and Summary

4:00 p.m.

 

Presenter Introductions

4:05 p.m.

Menten S. M. *   Bramson A. M.   Sori M. M.

Cryovolcanically Sourced Methane on Charon [#1047]
Charon exhibits evidence of cryovolcanism. We show that this cryovolcanism plausibly produced an ancient atmosphere to represent an endogenic source for its tholin-rich polar cap.

4:08 p.m.

Rathbun J. A. *   Tate C. D.   Hayes A. G.   Spencer J. R.

Active Volcanoes on Io:  Results of Ground-Based Observations from IRTF 2017-2020 [#2090]
What’s been erupting on Io lately? / Loki, Uta, Janus, oh my / Plus, four large outburst eruptions.

4:11 p.m.

Byrne P. K. *   Lopes R. M. C.   Radebaugh J.   Williams D. A.

An Extensionally Fractured Upper Lithosphere on Io [#2198]
A broken island / Straight lines abounding, suggests / A fractured Io.

4:14 p.m.

Skjetne H. L. *   Siniger K. N.   Hynek B. M.   Schenk P. M.   Olkin C. B.   et al.

Chaos Terrains on Pluto, Europa, and Mars:  Insights to Crustal Lithology and Structure [#2052]
We present a morphological comparison of blocks that make up chaos terrains on Pluto, Europa, and Mars using size and height measurements. We demonstrate that chaos blocks can be used to infer information about crustal lithology and structure.

4:17 p.m.

Leonard E. J. *   Howell S. M.   Mills A.   Senske D. A.   Patthoff D. A.   et al.

Bringing Order to Chaos:  Insights on the Formation of Chaos Terrain from Geologic Mapping of Europa at the Regional Scale [#2269]
Europa’s chaos:  / Blocks of different sizes, / What do they tell us?

4:20 p.m.

Howell S. M. *   Leonard E. J.   Lovelace-Sims K.   Mills A.   Senske D. A.   et al.

Fomenting Chaos:  Formation on Europa Through Dry Porous Compaction [#2423]
There’s water, water, / Everywhere. But it’s frozen / And pretty beat up.

4:23 p.m.

Schurmeier L. R. *   Brouwer G.   Fagents S. A.

Explosive Gas Emission Craters on Earth:  Possible Analog for Raised Rim Lakes on Titan [#1785]
Arctic ice craters / Analog for Titan lakes? / Gassy ice explodes!

4:26 p.m.

Sharma H. *   Hedman M. M.   Vahidinia S.

Variations in the Near-Infrared Spectra of the Enceladus Plume [#2326]
Enceladus plume / Its spectrum varies in time / Cassini VIMS saw these. Cassini VIMS observed time variations in the spectrum of the Enceladus plume in 2017. We will describe these variations and discuss their implications for Enceladus.

4:29 p.m.

 

Q&A

5:00 p.m.

 

End of Session

 

[M163]

Monday, March 15, 2021                                                    
EVOLUTION OF PARENT BODIES:  ACCRETION, DIFFERENTIATION, CRYSTALLIZATION, AND BOMBARDMENT

4:00 p.m.   Track 3

Chairs:  Julia Cartwright and Pipasa Layak

Monday Orals

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Times

Authors (*Denotes Presenter)

Abstract Title and Summary

4:00 p.m.

 

Presenter Introductions

4:05 p.m.

Anand A. *   Pape J.   Wille M.   Mezger K.   Hofmann B.

Accretion and Thermal Evolution of IIAB and IIIAB Iron Meteorite Parent Bodies Inferred from Mn-Cr Chronometry [#1933]
Mn-Cr model ages are determined from chromite or daubréelite fractions of IIAB and IIIAB iron meteorite samples. The model ages provide constraints on the accretion and differentiation of the parent bodies.

4:08 p.m.

Dodds K. H. *   Bryson J. F. J.   Neufeld J. A.   Harrison R. J.

The Thermal Evolution of Planetesimals during Accretion and Differentiation:  Consequences for Dynamo Generation by Thermally-Driven Convection [#2121]
The process and duration of differentiation and core formation controls a planetesimal’s ability to generate a thermally-driven dynamo field. We use this result to constrain the physical properties and accretionary history of the angrite parent body.

4:11 p.m.

Tornabene H. A. *   Ash R. D.   Walker R. J.

New Insights to the Genetics, Formation, and Crystallization History of Group IC Iron Meteorites [#1531]
The chemical and isotopic composition of the IC iron meteorite group is investigated and their formation history is explored via fractional crystallization modeling.

4:14 p.m.

Mikouchi T. *   Zolensky M. E.

Mineralogy and Cooling History of Ungrouped Achondrite Erg Chech 002 [#2457]
Erg Chech 002 is characterized by large pyroxene xenocrysts whose diffusive zoning profiles suggest fast cooling from high temperature. Trapping of deep interior rocks as xenocrysts might be a common magmatic process as found for quenched angrites.

4:17 p.m.

Hayashi H. *   Mikouchi T.

Stratigraphic Comparison Between Quenched Angrites and Komatiites [#2601]
We found stratigraphic similarities between quenched angrites and komatiites, indicating equivalent geological settings of their igneous bodies near the surface. In this case, quenched angrites might originate distant from the eruption site.

4:20 p.m.

Martinez C.   Righter M. *   Lapen T. J.   Irving A. J.

Further Insights of Temperature-Time Events on HED Parent Body Using U-Th-Pb Chronology of Zircon-Bearing Noritic Diogenite Northwest Africa 10666 [#2699]
We report zircon and apatite U-Th-Pb isotopic dating of zircon-bearing diogenite NWA 10666. The results are used to constrain their complex thermal history of the HED parent body.

4:23 p.m.

Dhaliwal J. K. *   Horan M. F.   Ash R. D.   Bullock E. S.   Carlson R. W.

Insights from Siderophile Elements into the Impact Origin of Mesosiderites [#2236]
Space rocks and breccias / Iron-loving elements / How did they evolve?

4:26 p.m.

White L. F. *   Moser D. E.   Darling J. R.   Rider-Stokes B.   Hyde B.   et al.

Accessory Mineral Chronology of Eucrites Reveals New Insights into the Formation, Evolution, and Bombardment of Vesta [#2124]
Accessory grains / Age and structure record the / History of Vesta.

4:29 p.m.

 

Q&A

5:00 p.m.

 

End of Session

 

[M164]

Monday, March 15, 2021                                                    
MARTIAN FLUIDS AND ELEMENT MOBILITY

4:00 p.m.   Track 4

Chairs:  Patrick Gasda and Cherie Achilles

Monday Orals

Tuesday Orals

Wednesday Orals

Thursday Orals

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Authors (*Denotes Presenter)

Abstract Title and Summary

4:00 p.m.

 

End of Session

4:05 p.m.

Das D. *   Gasda P. J.   Schwenzer S. P.   Crossey L.   Turner S. M. R.   et al.

Modeling the Behavior of Selected Water-Soluble Elements in Calcium Sulfate Veins of Gale Crater [#2155]
Earth is on fire / So, I found solace in old / Martian waterscapes.

4:08 p.m.

Nellessen M. A. *   Crossey L.   Gasda P. J.   Peterson E.   Lanza N.   et al.

Boron Adsorption onto Clay Minerals:  Insight into Martian Groundwater Geochemistry [#2413]
Boron adsorption analysis of martian clay analogs to determine capability of martian clays for facilitating prebiotic processes as well as the creation of boron standards to improve LIBS boron calibration.

4:11 p.m.

Forni O. *   Dehouck E.   Cousin A.   Bedford C. C.   David G.   et al.

Elevated Fluorine Abundances Below the Siccar Point Unconformity:  Implications for Fluid Circulation in Gale Crater [#1503]
We report numerous detections of high concentration of F at the Siccar Point unconformity in the Glen Torridon region of Gale Crater. We demonstrate the presence of global circulation near the contact between the Murray and the Stimson formations.

4:14 p.m.

Lanza N. L. *   Gasda P. J.   Essunfeld A.   Comellas J.   Caravaca G.   et al.

Chemistry of Manganese-Bearing Materials at the Groken Drill Site, Gale Crater, Mars [#2231]
We’re trying to grok / Weird manganese-phosphorus / Blebs near organics.

4:17 p.m.

Treiman A. H. *   Downs R. T.   Ming D. W.   Morris R. V.   Thorpe M. T.   et al.

Possible Detection of a Jahnsite-Whiteite Group Phosphate Mineral by MSL CheMin in Glen Torridon, Gale Crater, Mars [#1200]
Black nodules, extra / Manganese and phosphorus:  / Mineral surprise!

4:20 p.m.

Smith R. J. *   McLennan S. M.   Achilles C. N.   Dehouck E.   Horgan B. N.   et al.

X-Ray Amorphous Sulfates in Gale Crater, Mars [#1486]
Gale Crater sedimentary rocks contain amorphous or poorly crystalline Fe-, Ca-, and Mg-sulfates that likely pre-date diagenetic sulfate features (i.e., veins).

4:23 p.m.

Kaufman S. V. *   Mustard J. F.

Constraining the Surface Weathering Formation Conditions of the Olivine-Carbonate Unit in the Northeast Syrtis Region Using Reactive Transport Modelling [#2444]
Olivine dissolves. / Temperature-dependent / Magnesite then forms.

4:26 p.m.

Kodikara G. R. L. *   McHenry L. J.   Grundl T. J.

A Possible Formation Pathway for Zeolites in Closed-Basin Lakes on Noachian Mars:  Insights from Geochemical Modeling [#2259]
We explore the formation and fate of zeolites that may have formed in closed basin lakes where volcaniclastic materials were present during late Noachian-early Hesperian time.

4:29 p.m.

 

Q&A

5:00 p.m.

 

End of Session

 

[M165]

Monday, March 15, 2021                                                    
IMPACTS:  CHANGING PLANETARY BODIES

4:00 p.m.   Track 5

Chairs:  Thomas Davison and Anna Losiak

Monday Orals

Tuesday Orals

Wednesday Orals

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Times

Authors (*Denotes Presenter)

Abstract Title and Summary

4:00 p.m.

 

Presenter Introductions

4:05 p.m.

Carlson M. A. *   Johnson B. C.   Melosh H. J.

Effects of Atmosphere on Ejecta Emplacement on Earth and Mars [#1170]
Numerical simulations of impact ejecta plumes on Earth and Mars show high levels of atmospheric interactions on Earth and insignificant atmospheric interactions on Mars when full drag effects are included.

4:08 p.m.

Helhoski S. *   Nakajima M.   Gagne J.   Trail D.

A Numerical Model to Constrain the Origin of Lunar Impact Ejecta [#2576]
We quantify the effect of contamination on Apollo samples due to ejecta from nearby craters. Using iSALE impact simulations, we generate profiles of the landing locations of material and the pressure-temperature distributions of material.

4:11 p.m.

Wiggins S. E. *   Johnson B. C.

Solid Fragments Ejected by Lunar Hypervelocity Impacts [#2307]
We have used an implementation of the Grady-Kipp fragmentation algorithm to directly model the fragment size distribution within lunar ejecta curtains using the iSALE shock physics code.

4:14 p.m.

Powell T. M. *   Rubanenko L.   Williams J.-P.   Paige D. A.

Modeling the Accumulation of Secondary Craters on Mars and the Moon [#2410]
We model the global accumulation of secondary craters with time on Mars and the Moon, accounting for the spatial clustering of secondaries around their parent primary.

4:17 p.m.

Abramov O. *   Mojzsis S. J.

Thermal Consequences of Impact Bombardments to the Silicate Crusts of Terrestrial-Type Exoplanets [#1747]
We model the effects of post-accretionary impact bombardment on a mini-Earth (1/10 Earth mass), a super-Earth (10 times Earth mass), and Proxima Centauri b (2 times Earth mass), making predictions for lithospheric melting and habitable volumes.

4:20 p.m.

Wójcicka N. *   Collins G. S.   Bastow I. D.   Miljkovic K.   Rajsic A.

Seismic Source Time Function and Frequency Content of Impact-Generated Seismic Waves [#2134]
Seismic source models / Of meteorite impacts / Making waves on Mars.

4:23 p.m.

Holm-Alwmark S. *   Erickson T.   Cavosie A. J.

Twinned Magnetite in Granitic Samples from the Siljan Impact Structure, Sweden [#1089]
We describe twinning in magnetite in samples from the Siljan impact structure using electron backscatter diffraction. Observed twins occur in multiple orientation sets. We have not observed any such twins in seemingly unshocked investigated samples.

4:26 p.m.

Ballantyne H. *   Jutzi M.   Golabek G. J.

Identifying the Sweet Spot for an Impact-Induced Martian Dichotomy [#2777]
In this work, we use a large suite of smoothed-particle hydrodynamic simulations detailing a giant impact with a Mars-like body in an attempt to identify a parameter-space that could have led to the Martian Crustal Dichotomy.

4:29 p.m.

 

Q&A

5:00 p.m.

 

End of Session

 

[T201]

Tuesday, March 16, 2021                                                    
SPECIAL SESSION:  MARS 2020 I (LIVE PRESENTATIONS)

11:00 a.m.   Track 1

Chairs:  Katie Stack Morgan and Adrian Brown

Monday Orals

Tuesday Orals

Wednesday Orals

Thursday Orals

Friday Orals