51st Lunar and Planetary Science Conference

March 16-20, 2020

The Woodlands, Texas

 

Program and Abstracts

 

ORAL PROGRAM

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

 

POSTER PROGRAM

Tuesday

Thursday

 

 

 

 

ORAL SESSIONS

Sunday Afternoon, March 15, 4:00–8:00 p.m.

Waterway Ballroom 4 and 5

Registration and Welcome Reception

 

Monday Morning, March 16, 8:30 a.m.

Waterway Ballroom 1

Presolar, Cometary, and Interplanetary Dust

Waterway Ballroom 4

Special Session:  MSL Curiosity:  Vera Rubin Ridge, Glen Torridon, and Onward

Waterway Ballroom 5

Lunar Basalts and Volcanic Regions:  Perspective from Samples to Remote Sensing

Waterway Ballroom 6

Kuiper Belt Objects — KBOs are Cool

Montgomery Ballroom

Venus:  Investigating Why Earth’s Sister is Not Its Twin

 

Monday Morning, March 16, 10:15 a.m.

Waterway Ballroom 6

Ocean Worlds:  A Long Swim off a Deep Core

 

Monday Afternoon, March 16, 1:30 p.m.

Waterway Ballroom 4 and 5

Plenary Session Featuring the Masursky Lecture

 

Monday Afternoon, March 16, 2:30 p.m.

Waterway Ballroom 1

Differentiation and Other Early Processes on Asteroidal Parent Bodies

Waterway Ballroom 4

Mars InSight, On Site: Observations from One Year on Mars

Waterway Ballroom 5

ANGSA:  A Generational Science–Technology Handshake Between Apollo and Artemis

Waterway Ballroom 6

Modern Mars Surface Processes:  It’s All Downhill from Here

Montgomery Ballroom

Ceres and Vesta:  Rise of the Dwarf Planets!

 

Monday Evening, March 16, 5:30 p.m.

Waterway Ballroom 4, 5, and 6

NASA Headquarters Briefing
followed immediately by opening of the exhibits in the Town Center Exhibit Area

 

Tuesday Morning, March 17, 8:30 a.m.

Waterway Ballroom 1

Planetary Volcanism:  The Fire Rises

Waterway Ballroom 4

Special Session:  Ryugu and Bennu:  Connecting Geology and Returned Samples

Waterway Ballroom 5

Lunar Interior Volatiles:  It’s What’s on the Inside that Counts

Waterway Ballroom 6

Tectonics and Geodynamics of the Rocky Planets:  The Heat is On

Montgomery Ballroom

Impacts:  Frontiers in Modelling

 

Tuesday Morning, March 17, 10:15 a.m.

Waterway Ballroom 6

Mars Polar Regions

 

Tuesday Afternoon, March 17, 1:30 p.m.

Waterway Ballroom 1

Core Formation

Waterway Ballroom 4

Ryugu and Bennu:  Surface and Subsurface Evolution

Waterway Ballroom 5

Special Session:  Current Lunar Exploration:  Chandrayaan 2 and Chang’E 4

Waterway Ballroom 6

Reconstructing Surface Processes on Post-Noachian Mars

Montgomery Ballroom

Icy Planet Tectonics:  Breaking Up is Easy!

 

Tuesday Afternoon, March 17, 3:15 p.m.

Waterway Ballroom 1

Exoplanets — The Undiscovered Country

 

Wednesday Morning, March 18, 8:30 a.m.

Waterway Ballroom 1

Protoplanetary Disk Evolution

Waterway Ballroom 4

Special Session:  50 Years of Planetary Research in Antarctica:  Meteorites, Morphology, and Missions

Waterway Ballroom 5

Lunar Surface Volatiles and Exosphere:  It’s What’s on the Outside that Counts

Waterway Ballroom 6

Aqueous Alteration and Salts on Mars

Montgomery Ballroom

Titan

 

Wednesday Afternoon, March 18, 1:30 p.m.

Waterway Ballroom 1

Chondrites (Nebular Processes):  You are Hot and You are Old!

Waterway Ballroom 4

Composition and Processes of Asteroids and Comets

Waterway Ballroom 5

Special Session:  Scientific Exploration of the Lunar South Pole

Waterway Ballroom 6

Martian Mantle, Magmas, and Meteorites

Montgomery Ballroom

Atmospheric Processes Across the Solar System

 

Thursday Morning, March 19, 8:30 a.m.

Waterway Ballroom 1

Chondrule Formation

Waterway Ballroom 4

Astrobiology:  Life Detection and Prebiotic Chemistry

Waterway Ballroom 5

Lunar South Pole Studies

Waterway Ballroom 6

Reconstructing Fluvial and Lacustrine Processes on Early Mars

Montgomery Ballroom

Impacts:  Shocking and Rocking — Experiments and Rheology

 

Thursday Morning, March 19, 10:00 a.m.

Waterway Ballroom 1

Isotopic and Chemical Architecture of the Early Solar System

Waterway Ballroom 5

Lunar Regolith Processes

 

Thursday Afternoon, March 19, 1:30 p.m.

Waterway Ballroom 1

Chondrites and Their Components: Wet, Cold, or Warm?

Waterway Ballroom 4

Lunar Composition and Interior Processes

Waterway Ballroom 5

Space Weathering

Waterway Ballroom 6

The Search for Carbonates on Mars

Montgomery Ballroom

Near-Earth Asteroid Studies:  Avenging the Dinosaurs

 

Thursday Afternoon, March 19, 3:00 p.m.

Waterway Ballroom 4

Impacts:  Advances in Observational Techniques

 

Thursday Afternoon, March 19, 3:15 p.m.

Waterway Ballroom 6

What’s Next for Mars? The Geochemistry and Mineralogy of Future Mission Sites

 

Friday Morning, March 20, 8:30 a.m.

Waterway Ballroom 1

Chondrites and Their Components:  Parent Body Alteration

Waterway Ballroom 4

Astrobiology:  War of the Habitable Worlds

Waterway Ballroom 5

Lunar Crustal Evolution and Chronology

Waterway Ballroom 6

Martian Glaciers and Subsurface Ice

Montgomery Ballroom

Mercury — The Little Planet with a BIG Personality!

 

POSTER SESSIONS

Tuesday Evening, March 17, 6:00 p.m.

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session I:  Special Session:  Ryugu and Bennu:  Compositions, Boulders, and Space Weathering

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session I:  Special Session:  Ryugu and Bennu:  Topography and Sample Analyses

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session I:  Special Session:  Current Lunar Exploration:  Chandrayaan 2 and Chang’E 4

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session I:  Special Session:  Scientific Exploration of the Lunar South Pole

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session I:  Special Session:  Antarctic Meteorites and Micrometeorites

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session I:  Mars InSight:  What’s Shaking?

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session I:  Geodynamics of the Rocky Planets

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session I:  Tectonics of the Rocky Planets

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session I:  Venus:  Geology, Geophysics, and Geochemistry

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session I:  Venus:  Mission Concepts, Instruments, and Laboratory Facilities

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session I:  Gale Crater:  Geology and Stratigraphy

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session I:  Gale Crater:  Chemistry and Mineralogy

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session I:  Surface Water on Early Mars

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session I:  Red Rover, Red Lander, Send the Mars Robots Over:  Geology of Current and Future Landing Sites

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session I:  Mars Instruments and Methods

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session I:  Mars Polar Regions

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session I:  Lunar and Martian Sample Geochemistry

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session I:  ANGSA Special Lunar Samples:  Geologic Context and Preparing for Future Sample Return

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session I:  Lunar Magmatism:  Evolution of the Mantle and Crust

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session I:  Lunar Highlands:  From Formation to Meteorite Sampling

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session I:  Differentiation of the HED Parent Asteroid

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session I:  Differentiation of the Ureilite, Angrite, and Other Primitive Achondrite Parent Asteroids

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session I:  Presolar, Cometary, and Interplanetary Dust

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session I:  Genesis

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session I:  Protoplanetary Disk Evolution

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session I:  Chondrites and Their Components I

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session I:  Planetary Volcanism:  The Mars Fire Rises

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session I:  Planetary Volcanism:  The Fieldwork, Remote Sensing, and Laboratory Fire Rises

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session I:  Icy Planets:  Oceans and Geysers

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session I:  Icy Planets:  Tectonics and Interiors

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session I:  Icy Planets:  Mapping

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session I:  Icy Planets:  Surfaces

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session I:  Ceres and Vesta:  Rise of the Poster Planets!

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session I:  Exoplanets and Giant Planets

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session I:  Impacts:  Frontiers in Modelling

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session I:  Impacts:  Hazard Assessment and Mitigation

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session I:  Comets:  The Other Icy Body

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session I:  Small Bodies:  Future and Current Mission Targets

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session I:  Clever Planetary Science and Mission Concepts

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session I:  2020 Missions to Mars

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session I:  Mars Exploration Concepts (Except 2020 Missions)

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session I:  Lunar Surface Missions

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session I:  Exploring Other Worlds Beyond the Moon and Mars

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session I:  Bioastronautics:  Stayin’ Alive!

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session I:  Connect with NASA’s Science Activation Program

 

Thursday Evening, March 19, 6:00 p.m.

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session II:  Mercury — The Little Planet with a BIG Personality!

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session II:  How Primitive Are We? Igneous Rocks on Mars

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session II:  Mars Meteorites Shock and Awe

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session II:  Mars Alteration from Every Angle

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session II:  Planetary Spatial Data Infrastructure

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session II:  Mars: Big Data for a Small Planet

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session II:  Mars Geomorphology

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session II:  Modern Mars Surface Processes:  It’s All Downhill from Here

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session II:  Martian Glaciers and Subsurface Ice

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session II:  Atmospheric Processes Across the Solar System

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session II:  Exploring the Moon from Core to Crust

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session II:  Lunar Mapping of the Surface

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session II:  Lunar Impacts and Regolith Processes

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session II:  Lunar Surface Volatiles and Exosphere

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session II:  Core Formation, Iron Meteorites, and the NC-CC Dichotomy

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session II:  Chondrites and Their Components II

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session II:  Asteroids and Meteorites:  From Composition to Taxonomy

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session II:  Asteroids, Meteorites, Meteoroids, and Meteors

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session II:  Space Weathering

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session II:  Next Generation Workforce Development

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session II:  Astrobiology:  Prebiotic Chemistry

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session II:  Astrobiology:  Life Detection

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session II:  Astrobiology:  Habitability

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session II:  Impacts:  Petrologic Studies of Terrestrial Impact Craters and Ejecta

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session II:  Impacts:  Shocking and Rocking — Experiments and Rheology

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session II:  Impacts:  Advances in Observational Techniques

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session II:  Impacts:  Geophysical Studies of Terrestrial Craters

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session II:  CanMoon 2019:  Lunar Sample Return Analogue Mission

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session II:  Large-Scale Terrestrial Analog Studies:  SAND-E and HI-SEAS

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session II:  Analogs:  Igneous and Volcanic Processes and Their Secondary Products

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session II:  Analogs:  Spectral and Mineralogical Investigations of Mars Secondary Materials

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session II:  Analogs:  Planetary Simulants and Other Materials

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session II:  Earth Analog Studies of Planetary Systems

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session II:  Terrestrial Analog Studies of Planetary Tools, Technology, and Techniques (T^3)

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session II:  RAMAN Spectroscopy

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session II:  UV-VIS-IR Instruments

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session II:  Advanced Instrument Techniques

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session II:  Lunar Environment Studies and ISRU

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session II:  Walking Amongst the People:  Public Engagement Examples and Resources

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session II:  Engaging Diverse Audiences Through STEAM

 

ORAL SESSIONS

 

Monday, March 16, 2020

[M101]
PRESOLAR, COMETARY, AND INTERPLANETARY DUST

8:30 a.m.   Waterway Ballroom 1

Chairs:  Rhonda Stroud and Zack Gainsforth

 

Monday Orals   Tuesday Orals   Wednesday Orals   Thursday Orals   Friday Orals

 

Tuesday Posters   Thursday Posters   Back to Top

 

Times

Authors (*Denotes Presenter)

Abstract Title and Summary

8:30 a.m.

Singerling S. A. *   Liu N.   Nittler L. R.   Alexander C. M. O’D.   Stroud R. M.

TEM Structural and Compositional Studies of Presolar SiC Grains and their Relation to Raman Spectra [#2403]
Silicon carbide / Mostly mainstream and 3C / Raman finds rare types.

8:45 a.m.

Liu N. *   Meyer B. S.   Nittler L. R.   Alexander C. M. O’D.

A New Method for Constraining Explosive Environments in Type II Supernovae Using Presolar Silicon Carbide X Grain Isotopic Data [#2379]
We present a new method for constraining the parent supernovae of X grains by comparing grain data with a new set of models with a wide range of energies.

9:00 a.m.

Groopman E. E. *   Nittler L. R.   Verdier-Paoletti M.   Alexander C. M. O’D.   Amari S.

W, Hf, Ba Isotope Measurements in Large Presolar SiC Grains [#2087]
Silicon carbide / Tungsten, barium traces / From before the Sun.

9:15 a.m.

Dwarkadas V. V. *   Dilmohamed S.   Ekstrom S.   Meynet G.   Liu N.   et al.

Searching for the Signatures of Presolar Grains in Massive Stars [#2968]
Isotopic ratios in massive stars (> 10 solar masses) are compared to those in presolar oxide grains to determine if some grains originate in massive stars.

9:30 a.m.

Stroud R. M. *   Verdier-Paoletti M. J.   Nittler L. R.

In Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy of Oxygen-Rich Presolar Grains in the Paris Meteorite [#2900]
We present TEM studies from presolar silicates in the Paris CM showing the effects of the initial stages of aqueous alteration on presolar and matrix grains.

9:45 a.m.

Seifert L. *   Haenecour P.   Ramprasad T.   Zega T. J.

Structure and Chemistry of a Supernova Orthopyroxene Grain in the CO Chondrite Dominion Range 08006 [#2471]
Coordinated NanoSIMS, FIB, and TEM analysis of a supernova orthopyroxene grain to understand its structure, chemistry, and thermodynamic origins.

10:00 a.m.

Nguyen A. N. *   Keller L. P.   Rahman Z.

Coordinated NanoSIMS and TEM Analysis of a Large 26Mg-Rich AGB Silicate from the Meteorite Hills 00426 CR2 Chondrite [#2421]
The Mg isotopic composition of a large AGB forsterite crystal cannot be produced by AGB nucleosynthesis and mixing and suggests incomplete mixing in the ISM.

10:15 a.m.

Hoppe P. *   Leitner J.   Kodolányi J.   Vollmer C.

Magnesium- and Silicon-Isotopic Systematics of Presolar Silicate Grains [#1024]
We report new Mg and Si isotope data of presolar silicates from primitive meteorites and discuss implications for GCE and stellar sources of presolar silicates.

10:30 a.m.

Ohtaki K. K. *   Ishii H. A.   Bradley J. P.   Villalon K. L.   Brownlee D. E.   et al.

GEMS in Chondritic Meteorites? [#2380]
GEMS-like material in chondrites is compared to GEMS in IDPs by EDX and EELS mapping, and an alternative formation mechanism of a-silicate matrix is discussed.

10:45 a.m.

Gainsforth Z. *   Butterworth A. L.   Jilly-Rehak C. E.   Marcus M. A.   Westphal A. J.

Tracking Glass Structure in IDPs with O-XANES [#2991]
Using theoretical and experimental O-K XANES, we examine the structure of glasses in IDPs in order to infer their formation histories.

11:00 a.m.

Keller L. P. *   Snead C. J.

Aqueous Alteration in the Kuiper Belt:  Evidence from Hydrated Interplanetary Dust Particles [#2314]
Hydrated interplanetary dust particles provide evidence for aqueous activity on Kuiper belt objects.

11:15 a.m.

Engrand C. *   Charon E.   Leroux H.   Marinova M.   Duprat J.   et al.

Evidence of Irradiation in Interplanetary Space in Minerals from an Ultracarbonaceous Antarctic Micrometeorite (UCAMM) [#2008]
Irradiation features (rims and solar flare tracks) in UCAMMs are used to get insight into the formation and evolution of these cometary particles.

11:30 a.m.

Mathurin J. *   Dartois E.   Engrand C.   Duprat J.   Deniset-Besseau A.   et al.

Nanometre-Scale Infrared Chemical Imaging (AFM-IR) of Organic Matter in Ultra-Carbonaceous Antarctic Micrometeorites (UCAMMs) and Future Analyses of Hayabusa2 Samples [#1983]
We applied a novel IR microscopy technique (AFM-IR) to the study of nanoscale heterogeneities of organic matter in UltraCarbonaceous Antarctic MicroMeteorites.

 

Monday, March 16, 2020

[M102]
SPECIAL SESSION:  MSL CURIOSITY:  VERA RUBIN RIDGE, GLEN TORRIDON, AND ONWARD

8:30 a.m.   Waterway Ballroom 4

Chairs:  Catherine O’Connell-Cooper and Abigail Fraeman

 

Monday Orals   Tuesday Orals   Wednesday Orals   Thursday Orals   Friday Orals

 

Tuesday Posters   Thursday Posters   Back to Top

 

Times

Authors (*Denotes Presenter)

Abstract Title and Summary

8:30 a.m.

Horvath D. G. *   Andrews-Hanna J. C.

The Influence of Climate and Sedimentation on the Depositional Environment Within Gale Crater, Mars:  Implications for the Sedimentary Sequence Observed by Curiosity [#2286]
Observed changes in Mount Sharp stratigraphy may be the result of changes to climate, depositional setting, and/or basin hydrology due to sedimentation in Gale.

8:45 a.m.

Arvidson R. E. *

Use of MRO CRISM, HiRISE, and Curiosity Data to Map Bedrock and Sand Cover Properties Along Curiosity’s Traverses in Gale Crater, Mars [#1196]
MRO CRISM hyperspectral imaging data covering Vera Rubin Ridge and Glen Torridon are compared to MRO HiRISE and Curiosity observations.

9:00 a.m.

Fraeman A. A. *   Edgar L. A.   Rampe E. B.   L’Haridon J.   Mangold N.   et al.

The Origin of Vera Rubin Ridge:  Overview and Results from Curiosity’s Exploration Campaign [#1677]
We will provide an overview of Curiosity’s scientific campaign at Vera Rubin ridge and synthesize high-level science results.

9:15 a.m.

Rampe E. B. *   Bristow T. F.   Morris R. V.   Morrison S. M.   Achilles C. N.   et al.

Mineralogy of Vera Rubin Ridge in Gale Crater from the Mars Science Laboratory CheMin Instrument [#1601]
Mineralogical measurements of Vera Rubin ridge by the CheMin instrument identify hematite and other secondary phases suggesting a complex aqueous history.

9:30 a.m.

Frydenvang J. *   Mangold N.   Wiens R. C.   Fraeman A. A.   Edgar L. A.   et al.

The Role of Diagenesis at Vera Rubin Ridge in Gale Crater, Mars, and the Chemostratigraphy of the Murray Formation as Observed by the ChemCam Instrument [#1479]
Geochemical variations on Vera Rubin ridge in Gale Crater, Mars, relative to the overall Murray formation. Evidence for persistent groundwater activity.

9:45 a.m.

Fox V. K. *   Bennett K. A.   Bryk A.   Arvidson R. E.   Bristow T.   et al.

One Year in Glen Torridon:  Key Results from the Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity Rover Exploration of Clay-Bearing Units [#2833]
This abstract provides an overview of the major findings, initial interpretations, and key implications from the Glen Torridon campaign.

10:00 a.m.

Thorpe M. T. *   Bristow T. F.   Rampe E. B.   Grotzinger J. P.   Fox V. K.   et al.

Glen Torridon Mineralogy and the Sedimentary History of the Clay Mineral-Bearing Unit [#1524]
CheMin has discovered some of the most clay mineral rich sedimentary rocks traversed by Curiosity rover to date in the Glen Torridon region of Mt Sharp.

10:15 a.m.

Sutter B. *   McAdam A. C.   Achilles C. N.   Rampe E. B.   Archer P. D.   et al.

Aqueous Processes and Microbial Habitability of Gale Crater Sediments from the Blunts Point to the Glen Torridon Clay Unit [#2102]
The Blunts Point to Glen Torridon sediments experienced a complex deposition and alteration history where nitrogen was likely a limiting microbial nutrient.

10:30 a.m.

McAdam A. C. *   Sutter B.   Archer P. D.   Franz H. B.   Eigenbrode J. L.   et al.

The Chemistry and Mineralogy of the Glen Torridon Clay-Bearing Unit from Mars Science Laboratory Sample Analysis at Mars Analyses [#2243]
We discuss MSL Sample Analysis at Mars instrument analyses of clay-bearing unit samples and implications for environmental history and organic preservation.

10:45 a.m.

Gasda P. J. *   Das D.   Nellessen M.   Dehouck E.   Rapin W.   et al.

Veins in Glen Torridon, Gale Crater, Mars:  Exploring the Potential Transition into the Sulfate-Bearing Unit [#1641]
Do the observations of sulfates, cements, and nodules at the top of the clay-bearing unit represent the beginning of the transition to a drier climate on Mars?

11:00 a.m.

Bryk A. B. *   Dietrich W. E.   Fox V. K.   Bennett K. A.   Banham S. G.   et al.

The Stratigraphy of Central and Western Butte and the Greenheugh Pediment Contact [#2612]
Curiosity’s traverse through Glen Torridon provides new insights into the stratigraphy of Mt. Sharp and the paleoenvironments of Gale Crater, Mars.

11:15 a.m.

Wiens R. C. *   Mangold N.   Forni O.   Anderson R. B.   Gasnault O.   et al.

First Gale Western Butte Capping-Unit Compositions, and Relationships to Earlier Units Along Curiosity’s Traverse [#2396]
First compositions of capping unit of Western Butte, near Greenheugh pediment, Gale Crater, are surprisingly more mafic than Stimson, matching Shaler instead.

11:30 a.m.

Banham S. G. *   Gupta S.   Bryk A. B.   Rubin D. M.   Edgett K. S.   et al.

Does the Greenheugh Pediment Capping Unit Represent a Continuation of the Stimson Formation? [#2337]
A skirt of blown sand / Rippled by a wind now lost / Tattered fragments now.

 

Monday, March 16, 2020

[M103]
LUNAR BASALTS AND VOLCANIC REGIONS:  PERSPECTIVE FROM SAMPLES TO REMOTE SENSING

8:30 a.m.   Waterway Ballroom 5

Chairs:  Ali Bramson and Sarah Valencia

 

Monday Orals   Tuesday Orals   Wednesday Orals   Thursday Orals   Friday Orals

 

Tuesday Posters   Thursday Posters   Back to Top

 

Times

Authors (*Denotes Presenter)

Abstract Title and Summary

8:30 a.m.

Pernet-Fisher J. F. *   Nottingham M.   Curran N. M.   Joy K. H.

Cosmic-Ray Exposure Histories of Th-Rich Lunar Regolith Breccias [#1376]
Noble gas isotopes systematic are reported in order to investigate if low-Ti, Th-rich lunar meteorites are paired.

8:45 a.m.

Yen C. J.-K. *   Carpenter P. K.   Irving A. J.   Jolliff B. L.

Igneous Processes on the Moon as Seen in Northwest Africa 12384:  A Lunar Mare Basalt Breccia Puzzle [#2804]
Picritic glass beads / Parental to basalt clasts? / A lunar puzzle.

9:00 a.m.                  

 

Burney D. *   Neal C. R.   Irving A. J.   Carpenter P. K.   Tepper J. H.   et al.

Petrology and Chemical Composition of Lunar Mare Diabase Northwest Africa 12839:  Comparisons with Apollo Basalts [#2613]
The geochemical analysis of NWA 12839 shows that it has trace element chemistry similarities to Apollo 14 type C basalts, but major element chemistry similar to NNL meteorites.

9:15 a.m.

Liang W. *   Andrews-Hanna J. C.

Looking Deeper into the Linear Gravity Gradient Anomalies on the Moon [#2458]
We investigate the lunar Bouguer gravity gradient anomalies, thought to be volcanically flooded rifts, using their localized power spectra and forward models.

9:30 a.m.

Bramson A. M. *   Carter L. M.   Patterson G. W.   Jozwiak L. M.   Morgan G. A.   et al.

Heterogeneities in Composition and Burial Depth of the Lunar Schiller-Schickard Cryptomare [#1353]
We map the lunar Schiller-Schickard region in radar and conclude it contains a complex network of lava flows buried under ejecta of variable thickness.

9:45 a.m.

Brown S. M. *   Grove T. L.

Melting Conditions of Primary Lunar Ultramafic Glasses [#2954]
We have developed a technique to correct lunar ultramafic magmas for the effects of fractional crystallization and assimilation.

10:00 a.m.

Bennett K. A. *   Pigue L. M.   Gaddis L.   Allen C. C.   Greenhagen B. T.   et al.

Christiansen Feature Values and Estimated Iron Abundance of Lunar Pyroclastic Deposits [#2721]
We obtain CF values and iron content of lunar pyroclastic deposits to identify the most primitive magma sources and potentially resource-rich targets.

10:15 a.m.

Valencia S. N. *   Watkins R. N.   Moriarty D. P. III   Jolliff B. L.   Petro N. E.

Surface Composition and Mineralogy of the Apennine Bench Formation [#2293]
KREEPy Apennine / Photometry and M3 / Tell mafic content.

10:30 a.m.

Bell S. K. *   Joy K. H.   Pernet-Fisher J. F.   Hartley M. E.

Timescales of Magma Transfer in Apollo 15 Mare Basalts Obtained Through Fe-Mg Diffusion Modelling in Olivine Crystals [#1443]
Diffusion timescales of Fe-Mg in olivine crystals have been calculated to investigate magmatic processes within the Apollo 15 mare basalts.

10:45 a.m.

Qiao L. *   Head J. W.   Wilson L.   Ling Z.

Mare Domes in Mare Tranquillitatis:  Identification, Distribution, Characteristics, and Implications for Their Origin and the Oldest Lunar Volcanism [#1798]
Hundreds of mare domes are identified in Mare Tranquillitatis, indicating shield-building eruptions may be prevalent in the earliest stage of lunar volcanism.

11:00 a.m.

Stopar J. D. *   Lawrence S. J.   van der Bogert C. H.   Hiesinger H.   Giguere T. A.

A Fresh Look at the Stratigraphy of Northern Australe [#2144]
We combined stratigraphy, composition, gravity, surface ages, images, and other available data to reassess Australe’s volcanic deposits, structure, and geology.

11:15 a.m.

Thesniya P. M. *   Rajesh V. J.   Flahaut J.

High-Titanium Olivine-Rich Basalts from the Grimaldi Basin on the Nearside of the Moon:  Implications for the Volcanic History of the Basin [#3069]
We report that basaltic volcanism was active and fed by different mantle sources till 2.05 Ga for a period spanning ~1.2 billion years in the Grimaldi Basin.

11:30 a.m.

Qian Y. *   Xiao L.   Head J. W.

The Young Mare Basalts in Chang’E 5 Mission Landing Region, Northern Oceanus Procellarum [#1459]
We introduce the young mare basalt unit in Chang’e-5 landing region in northern Oceanus Procellarum, which will give backgrounds in future sample analysis.

 

Monday, March 16, 2020

[M104]
KUIPER BELT OBJECTS — KBOS ARE COOL

8:30 a.m.   Waterway Ballroom 6

Chairs:  Simon Porter and Xiaochen Mao

 

Monday Orals   Tuesday Orals   Wednesday Orals   Thursday Orals   Friday Orals

 

Tuesday Posters   Thursday Posters   Back to Top

 

Times

Authors (*Denotes Presenter)

Abstract Title and Summary

8:30 a.m.

McKinnon W. B. *   Hamilton D. P.   Grundy W. M.   Keane J. T.   Nesvorny D.   et al.

Evolution of Binary Planetesimals Due to Gas Drag in the Solar Nebula [#2988]
We examine whether gas drag can cause the orbits of KBO binaries to shrink and ultimately result in bilobate bodies such as Arrokoth or 67P. The answer is yes!

8:45 a.m.

Hirabayashi M. *   Trowbridge A. J.   Bodewits D.

The Mysterious Location of Maryland on 2014 MU69 and the Reconfiguration of Its Bilobate Shape [#1258]
Arrokoth’s neck / Broken by Mayland impact / Born as a new shape.

9:00 a.m.

Keane J. T. *   Umurhan O. M.   Porter S. B.   Beyer R. A.   McKinnon W. B.   et al.

The Geophysical Environment of (486958) Arrokoth [#2444]
Small, cold Arrokoth / Spinning slow, gravity weak / A fluffy fossil.

9:15 a.m.

Mao X. *   McKinnon W. B.   Singer K. N.   Keane J. T.   Robbins S. J.   et al.

Merger and Spindown of (486958) Arrokoth by Collisions [#2592]
Impacts change Arrokoth’s spin over time, but are unlikely to substantially despin a “primordial” Arrokoth with faster spin to its current 15.92 hr value alone.

9:30 a.m.

Noviello J. L. *   Desch S. J.   Neveu M.

Haumea’s Formation and Evolution from a Graze-and-Merge Impact [#2894]
As Haumea’s core / Grew and hydrated, spin rate / Predictably changed.

9:45 a.m.

Moore J. M. *   Umurhan O. M.   White O. L.   McKinnon W. B.   Spencer J. R.   et al.

Scarp Retreat on (486958) Arrokoth:  Evidence and Implications for Composition and Structure [#1691]
Putative scarp retreat on KBO Arrokoth, if real, is most likely due to sublimation degradation, and implies it might be layered.

10:00 a.m.

Lisse C. M. *   Young L. A.   Cruikshank D. P.   Stern S. A.   Keane J. T.   et al.

On the Origin and Stability of Pluto’s and MU69’s Ices [#1972]
The New Horizons flyby of KBO MU69 found large amounts of methanol on its surface. We explain why this makes sense compared to Pluto, the Centaurs, and comets.

 

Monday, March 16, 2020

[M105]
VENUS:  INVESTIGATING WHY EARTH’S SISTER IS NOT ITS TWIN

8:30 a.m.   Montgomery Ballroom

Chairs:  Nicholas Lang and Joseph O’Rourke

 

Monday Orals   Tuesday Orals   Wednesday Orals   Thursday Orals   Friday Orals

 

Tuesday Posters   Thursday Posters   Back to Top

 

Times

Authors (*Denotes Presenter)

Abstract Title and Summary

8:30 a.m.

O’Rourke J. G. *                       

Venus:  A Thick Basal Magma Ocean May Exist Today [#1669]
The lowermost ~100–400 km of the mantle of Venus may remain molten today, just like Earth’s mantle was a few billion years ago. It’s where the argon-40 hides?

8:45 a.m.                

Bjonnes E. *   Johnson B. C.   Evans A. J.

Determining Venus’ Thermal Conditions Through Multiring Basin Formation [#2511]
Obscured by dense clouds / Venusian history / Revealed through impacts.

9:00 a.m.

Knicely J. *   Herrick R. R.

Unusual Mid-Sized Volcanoes on Venus:  Changes in Volcanic Processes [#2860]
On planet Venus / Several strange volcanoes / High viscosity?

9:15 a.m.

Lang N. P. *   McCarthy J. S.   Thomson B. J.

Morphology of Small Shield Edifices at Idunn Mons, Venus:  Implications for the Volcanic History of a Potentially Active Volcano [#1560]
The morphology of small shield edifices on the flanks of Idunn Mons, Venus, suggests multiple episodes of waxing and waning of activity at this volcano.

9:30 a.m.

Tucker W. S. *   Dombard A. J.

Topographic Change Recorded by Lava Flows at Coronae on Venus:  Evidence of Evolutionary Complexity [#2040]
Coronae are strange / Some lava flows go uphill / Something changed their slopes.

9:45 a.m.

Brossier J. *   Gilmore M. S.   Toner K.

Distinct Mineralogy Associated with Individual Lava Flows in Atla Regio, Venus [#1063]
We identify multiple radar emissivity declines within individual lava flows, in order to evaluate the mineralogical evolution of the volcanic systems.

10:00 a.m.

Treiman A. H. *   Filiberto J.   Vander Kaaden K. E.

Hot Rocks! Near-Infrared Reflectances (and Emissivities) of Rocks at Venus Surface Temperatures [#1158]
Our inner light glows / But is easiest to see / When it’s reflected.

10:15 a.m.

Teffeteller H. *   Filiberto J.   McCanta M. C.   Treiman A. H.   Keller L.   et al.

Experimental Study of the Alteration of Basalt on the Surface of Venus [#2038]
Basalt at the surface of Venus likely undergoes chemical alteration with the atmosphere. We need to better understand the mechanism of this alteration.

10:30 a.m.

Cutler K. S.    Filiberto J. *   Treiman A. H.   Trang D.

Experimental Investigation of Basalt and Pyroxene Oxidation:  Implications for Spectroscopic Analysis of the Surface of Venus [#1913]
High-temperature oxidation effects on visible to near-infrared spectra of pyroxene and basalt are explored, with implications for the remote sensing of Venus.

10:45 a.m.

Byrne P. K. *   Ghail R. C.   Gilmore M. S.   ?engör A. M. C.   Klimczak C.   et al.

Some Venus Tesserae Feature Layered, Folded, and Eroded Rocks [#2514]
Ancient Venus rocks / Were deposited, folded / And then eroded.

11:00 a.m.

Khawja S. K. *   Ernst R. E.   Samson C. S.   Byrne P. K.   Richard Ghail R. C.

Erosional Features on Tessera Terrains, Venus [#1161]
Recent models suggest Earth-like conditions once existed on Venus. This project aims to investigate tesserae in detail in search for evidence of fluvial erosion.

11:15 a.m.

Ernst R. E. *   Samson C.   Bethell E.   Khawja S.

Geological Constraints on the Timing of the Extreme Warming Climate Transition on Venus [#1174]
The extreme warming climate transition left marks in the Venusian geological record in the intra-tessera plains units and/or earliest plains units.

11:30 a.m.

Peplowski P. N. *   Lawrence D. J.   Wilson J. T.

Chemically-Distinct Regions of Venus’ Atmosphere Revealed by MESSENGER-Measured N2 Concentrations [#2554]
MESSENGER neutron measurements provide N2 concentrations and reveal an unexpectedly low altitude homopause of 50 km.

 

Monday, March 16, 2020

[M106]
OCEAN WORLDS:  A LONG SWIM OFF A DEEP CORE

10:15 a.m.   Waterway Ballroom 6

Chairs:  Marc Neveu and Jennifer Hanley

 

Monday Orals   Tuesday Orals   Wednesday Orals   Thursday Orals   Friday Orals

 

Tuesday Posters   Thursday Posters   Back to Top

 

Times

Authors (*Denotes Presenter)

Abstract Title and Summary

10:15 a.m.

Bierson C. J. *   Nimmo F.   Stern S. A.   Olkin C. B.   Weaver H. A.   et al.

The Plausibility of an Ocean on Pluto Shortly After Accretion [#1497]
After Pluto formed / Did Pluto start hot or cold? / Extension says hot.

10:30 a.m.

Ray C. *   Glein C. R.   Waite J. H. Jr   Miller K. E.

The Volatile Composition of Europa’s Ocean [#2953]
We present our models of the speciation of carbon and nitrogen volatiles in Europa’s ocean as a function of different geochemical parameters in the interior.

10:45 a.m.

Nathan E. *   Berton M.   Girona T.   Karani H.   Huber C.   et al.

The Role of Dissolved Volatiles on the Freezing of an Ocean World [#1415]
Freezing mini moons / Ice shell grows / Ocean compressed / What controls fractures?

11:00 a.m.

Melwani Daswani M. *   Vance S. D.

Europa’s Exsolved Proto-Ocean [#3056]
Europa’s ocean may be entirely derived from the destabilization of volatile-bearing minerals in the rocky interior.

11:15 a.m.

Fox-Powell M. G. *   Cousins C. R.

Freezing-Induced Fractionation of Ice, Glass, and Salts from Simulated Enceladus Ocean Fluids [#1771]
We present experimental demonstrations of phase partitioning possible during cryovolcanism on Saturn’s moon Enceladus.

11:30 a.m.

Fifer L. M. *   Toner J. D.   Catling D. C.

The Composition and Habitability of Enceladus’ Ocean [#2727]
Erupting plumes provide a glimpse into Enceladus’ subsurface ocean composition and habitability, but fractionation processes alter plume from ocean composition.

 

Monday, March 16, 2020

[M150]
PLENARY SESSION FEATURING THE MASURSKY LECTURE

1:30 p.m.   Waterway Ballroom 4 and 5

Chairs:  Louise Prockter and Eileen Stansbery

 

Monday Orals   Tuesday Orals   Wednesday Orals   Thursday Orals   Friday Orals

 

Tuesday Posters   Thursday Posters   Back to Top

 

 

John Grotzinger

 

The Early Aqueous Environment of Mars Inferred from Mission Lifetime Results by the Curiosity Rover at Gale Crater

John Grotzinger is the Ted and Ginger Jenkins Chair Professor of Geology, and the Division Chair for Geological and Planetary Sciences at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). He received his B.Sc. from Hobart College, M.Sc. from the University of Montana, Ph.D. from Virginia Tech, and was a postdoctoral fellow at Columbia University. Prior to moving to Caltech in 2005, he spent 18 years as a member of the faculty at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he was the Robert Shrock Professor of Geology. At Caltech his research group studies the co-evolution of surficial environments on Earth and Mars. Field mapping studies are the starting point for more topical laboratory-based studies involving geochemical, geologic, and geochronological techniques. He served as the Project Scientist for the Mars Curiosity Rover mission from 2007 to 2015 and now serves as the strategic path planner. He was a participating scientist on the Mars Exploration Rover and HiRISE teams, and is a Co-I on the 2020 rover team.

 

 

 

Monday, March 16, 2020

[M151]
DIFFERENTIATION AND OTHER EARLY PROCESSES ON ASTEROIDAL PARENT BODIES

2:30 p.m.   Waterway Ballroom 1

Chairs:  Paul Warren and Carl Agee

 

Monday Orals   Tuesday Orals   Wednesday Orals   Thursday Orals   Friday Orals

 

Tuesday Posters   Thursday Posters   Back to Top

 

Times

Authors (*Denotes Presenter)

Abstract Title and Summary

2:30 p.m.

Goodrich C. A. *   Nestola F.   Jakubek R.   Erickson T.   Fries M.   et al.

The Origin of Diamonds in Ureilites [#1411]
Diamonds in ureilites did not form under high static pressures, but by impact shock. There is no evidence that the ureilite parent asteroid was a large embryo.

2:45 p.m.

Amari S. *

The Origin of Ureilites:  A Noble-Gas Perspective [#1716]
We propose that the noble gases in ureilties were added from the impactor during the catastrophic breakup.

3:00 p.m.

Barbaro A. *   Domeneghetti M. C.   Meneghetti M.   Litti L.   Fioretti A. M.   et al.

Shock Temperature Recorded by Graphite in Ureilites from Almahata Sitta [#1480]
We investigated three ureilitic samples using Raman Spectroscopy with the aim of determining the temperature recorded by graphite using a geothermometer.

3:15 p.m.

Collinet M. *   Grove T. L.

Incremental Melting in the Ureilite Parent Body:  Temperature, Melt Compositions, and Internal Structure [#1873]
New thermometer based on olivine-pyroxene Cr partitioning highlights the relationships between ureilite groups. The final silicate melts were CaO-rich.

3:30 p.m.

Cernok A. *   Tait K.   Anand M.   Nicklin I.   White L.   et al.

A Water-Rich Proto-Planet Inferred by Tridymite and Pyroxene in the Oldest Igneous Achondrite Northwest Africa 11119 [#1900]
Water abundance in pyroxene and tridymite in the oldest volcanic meteorite NWA 11119 indicates a water-rich planetesimal at the dawn of the solar system.

3:45 p.m.

Vaci Z. *   Yang S.   Humayun M.   Agee C. B.

Petrology and Geochemistry of Andesitic Ungrouped Achondrites Northwest Africa 6698 and 11575 [#1697]
Northwest Africa 6698 and 11575 are andesitic rocks with low abundances of siderophile elements and oxygen isotopes that link them to LL chondrites.

4:00 p.m.

Agee C. B. *   Aikin H.   Ziegler K.

Northwest Africa 12869:  Primitive Achondrite from the CR2 Parent Body or Member of a New Meteorite Group? [#2292]
We report the classification of a new primitive achondrite, Northwest Africa 12869. Is it from the CR2 parent body or is it from the Ténéréite parent body?

4:15 p.m.

Warren P. H. *   Gessler N.

Northwest Africa 2191, an Extraordinarily Evolved Eucrite [#2446]
In various ways, NWA 2191 is the most evolved eucrite yet known. Metamorphism is as widespread among evolved (late?) eucrites as it is among Main Group types.

4:30 p.m.

Lucas M. P. *   Dygert N.   Miller N. R.   McSween H. Y.

An Application of REE-in-Two-Pyroxene Thermometry to Primitive Achondrites:  Illuminating the Thermal Histories of Partially Differentiated Asteroids [#2699]
We use traditional mineral thermometers, plus a REE-in-two-px thermometer, to posit that acapulcoites were heated by interaction with lodranite partial melts.

 

Monday, March 16, 2020

[M152]
MARS INSIGHT, ON SITE: OBSERVATIONS FROM ONE YEAR ON MARS

2:30 p.m.   Waterway Ballroom 4

Chairs:  Ingrid Daubar and Anna Mittelholz

 

Monday Orals   Tuesday Orals   Wednesday Orals   Thursday Orals   Friday Orals

 

Tuesday Posters   Thursday Posters   Back to Top

 

Times

Authors (*Denotes Presenter)

Abstract Title and Summary

2:30 p.m.

Stähler S. C. *   Clinton J. F.   Giardini D.   Smrekar S.   Böse M.   et al.

Active Tectonics on Mars as Seen by InSight [#2000]
Marsquake catalogue / When will we get a big one? / Patiently we wait.

2:45 p.m.

Kawamura T. *   Margerin L.   Drilleau M.   Menina S.   Lognonné P.   et al.

Investigation of Mars Seismic Attenuation Using InSight SEIS Data [#2370]
We study Mars’ seismic attenuation using InSight SEIS data.

3:00 p.m.

Knapmeyer-Endrun B. *   Bissig F.   Compaire N.   Joshi R.   Garcia R.   et al.

Seismic Constraints on the Crustal Structure of Mars from InSight Receiver Functions [#1914]
We present first constraints on crustal structure of Mars from seismology at the InSight landing site, which can be used to determine global crustal thickness.

3:15 p.m.

Wieczorek M. A. *   Plesa A.-C.   Knapmeyer-Endrun B.   McLennan S. M.   Nimmo F.   et al.

Global Crustal Thickness Modeling of Mars Using InSight Seismic Constraints [#1393]
InSight seismic data constrain the thickness and density of the martian crust.

3:30 p.m.

Hudson T. L. *   Deen R.   Marteau E.   Golombek M.   Hurst K.   et al.

InSight HP3 Mole Near-Surface Motion and Subsurface Implications [#1217]
Mole goes up and down / No rock but thick duricrust / See what lies beneath.

3:45 p.m.

Piqueux S. *   Mueller N.   Grott M.   Knollenberg J.   Siegler M.   et al.

Regolith Properties Near the InSight Lander Derived from 100 Sols of Radiometer Measurements [#1309]
We fit diurnal temperature curves acquired by the InSight radiometer in order to derive regolith thermo-physical properties near the lander.

4:00 p.m.

Mueller N. T. *   Grott M.   Piqueux S.   Lemmon M.   Maki J.   et al.

Mars Soil Properties from Phobos Eclipse Observations by InSight HP³ RAD [#2150]
Mars surface temperature response to insolation variations constrains soil properties and indicates layering consistent with cementation at depth.

4:15 p.m.

Daubar I. J. *   Lognonné P.   Teanby N.   Clinton J.   Malin M.   et al.

Searching for Impacts with Insight:  A New Approach [#2657]
Detecting an impact in both seismic and imaging data would be an important result, but we have yet to find definitive indicators of an impact in InSight data.

4:30 p.m.

Lucas A. *   Kawamura T.   Mangeney A.   Onodera K.   Kenda B.   et al.

Investigation on Putative Explanation for SEIS/InSight Unknown Events from Rock Avalanches and Rockfalls and Comparison with Alpine Cases [#1840]
We investigate the origin of some events detected by SEIS/InSight seismometer on Mars as mass wasting by comparison with cases in the Alps.

 

Monday, March 16, 2020

[M153]
ANGSA:  A GENERATIONAL SCIENCE–TECHNOLOGY HANDSHAKE BETWEEN APOLLO AND ARTEMIS

2:30 p.m.   Waterway Ballroom 5

Chairs:  Harrison Schmitt and Juliane Gross

 

Monday Orals   Tuesday Orals   Wednesday Orals   Thursday Orals   Friday Orals

 

Tuesday Posters   Thursday Posters   Back to Top

 

Times

Authors (*Denotes Presenter)

Abstract Title and Summary

2:30 p.m.

Shearer C. K. *   McCubbin F. M.   Zeigler R.   Gross J.   Barnes J. J.   et al.

ANGSA Initiative, A Low-Cost Lunar “Sample Return Mission.” Science and Engineering Goals, Special Samples, Teams, and Progress [#1181]
Unexamined Apollo samples are being opened for science and engineering studies! Here we provide an update to the ANGSA initiative.

2:45 p.m.

Schmitt H. H. *

Geologic Context of ANGSA Apollo 17 Double Drive Tube Core 73001/2 [#1121]
ANGSA study of Apollo 17 core 73001/2 includes the geology of the light mantle avalanche and its subsequent modification by local impacts and space weathering.

3:00 p.m.

Krysher C. H. *   Mosie A. B.   Gross J.   Zeigler R. A.   McCubbin F. M.   et al.

Adventures in Lunar Core Processing:  Timeline of and Preparation for Opening of Core Sample 73002 for the ANGSA Program [#2989]
Patiently waiting / The extrusion has commenced / Now science begins.

3:15 p.m.

Zeigler R. A. *   Hanna R.   Edey D.   Eckley S. A.   Ketcham R. A.   et al.

Using X-Ray Computed Tomography to Image Apollo Drive Tube 73002 [#3023]
Apollo samples / Viewed in a new kind of light / X-rays are awesome.

3:30 p.m.

Sun L. *   Lucey P.   Flom A.   Shearer C.   Zeigler R.   et al.

Multispectral Imaging and Hyperspectral Profile of the First Dissection for Core 73002 [#1754]
Multispectral images and hyperspectral profile obtained during the first dissection of core 73002 reveal systematic spectral darkening and reddening with depth.

3:45 p.m.

Elsila J. E. *   Aponte J. C.   Dworkin J. P.   Glavin D. P.   McLain H. L.   et al.

Analysis of Volatile Organic Compounds in the Apollo Next Generation Sample Analysis (ANGSA) 73002 Core Sample [#1039]
We searched for volatile organic compounds in the newly opened Apollo 73002 core sample as part of the Apollo Next Generation Sample Analysis (ANGSA) program.

4:00 p.m.

Cohen B. A. *   Curran N. M.   Valencia S. N.   Corrigan C. M.   Bullock E. S.

Moon United:  Measuring Cosmic-Ray Exposure Ages of Pristine Sample Horizons [#1079]
Cosmic ray cloudbursts / Seed blooms of noble gases / Over lunar plains.

4:15 p.m.

Wilbur Z. E. *   Barnes J. J.   Eckley S. A.   Boyce J. W.   Brounce M.   et al.

Investigating the Magmatic History of Volatiles in Apollo 17 Basalts, Apollo Next Generation Sample Analysis [#2236]
As part of the Apollo Next Generation Sample Analysis (ANGSA) Program, we utilize coordinated analyses to understand the magmatic history of Apollo 17 basalts.

4:30 p.m.

Sehlke A. *   Sears D. W.

Looking Backwards to Looking Forwards:  A Fifty-Year Experiment in the Kinetics of Thermoluminescence of Lunar Samples and the Apollo Next Generation Sample Analysis Program (ANGSA) [#1147]
Thermoluminescence kinetics studies of lunar samples, and their thermal and radiation history.

 

Monday, March 16, 2020

[M154]
MODERN MARS SURFACE PROCESSES:  IT’S ALL DOWNHILL FROM HERE

2:30 p.m.   Waterway Ballroom 6

Chairs:  Matthew Golombek and Katherine Primm

 

Monday Orals   Tuesday Orals   Wednesday Orals   Thursday Orals   Friday Orals

 

Tuesday Posters   Thursday Posters   Back to Top

 

Times

Authors (*Denotes Presenter)

Abstract Title and Summary

2:30 p.m.

Sinha R. K. *   Ray D.   de Haas T.   Conway S. J.

Global Documentation of Overlapping Lobate Deposits in Martian Gullies:  Implications for the Role of Debris-Flow Process in Gully Formation [#1275]
We report 20 new craters in which morphological evidence of lobate deposits occur in gullies. Lobe morphology suggests formation by a debris flow-like process.

2:45 p.m.

de Haas T.   McArdell B. W.   Conway S. J. *   McElwaine J. N.   Salese F.   et al.

Initiation and Flow Conditions of Contemporary Flows in Martian Gullies [#1022]
We employ the RAMMS debris flow and avalanche model to back-calculate initial and flow conditions of recent flows in three gullies in Hale Crater.

3:00 p.m.

Primm K. M. *   Hoover R. H.   Kaplan H. H.   Stillman D. E.

Seasonality and Surface Properties of Slope Streaks [#2556]
Slope streaks are on Mars / But do we know how they form? / Let’s try to find out.

3:15 p.m.

Munaretto G. *   Pajola M.   Cremonese G.   Re C.   Lucchetti A.   et al.

The First CaSSIS Observations of Martian Recurring Slope Lineae:  Implications for Their Origin and Evolution [#1456]
We report the first observations of RSL by the Colour and Surface Science Imaging System (CaSSIS) on board ESA’s ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter (TGO).

3:30 p.m.

Shumway A. O. *   Toner J. D.   King S. C.

Seasonal Slope Hydration Cycles Could Explain the Formation of Recurring Slope Lineae [#2967]
New experimental results explore the role of adsorbed water in RSL formation by studying the effect of relative humidity on slope stability in martian sediments.

3:45 p.m.

Tinker C. *   Horgan B.   Howl B.   Fenton L.   Smith R.   et al.

Origin and Weathering of Dune Sands on Mars from Thermal-Infrared Spectra [#2666]
Revised TES endmember libraries identify glass and diverse alteration assemblages in martian dunes, including abundant poorly crystalline alteration products.

4:00 p.m.

Dorn T. C. *   Day M. D.

Intracrater Sediment Trapping and Transport in Arabia Terra, Mars [#1708]
We interpret surface-wind interactions in craters with terminal dune fields in Arabia Terra to understand how crater geometry influences sediment transport.

4:15 p.m.

Runyon K. D. *   Viviano C. E.   Day M. D.

Dunes to Yardangs:  Deposition and Erosion in Syria and Daedalia Plana, Mars [#1083]
Dust, dunes, and yardangs / Made by wind, destroyed by wind / Volcanoes to blame?

4:30 p.m.

Golombek M. *   Charalambous C.   Pike W. T.   Sullivan R.

The Origin of Sand and Dust on Mars:  Evidence from the Insight Landing Site [#2744]
Quantitative models of impact and eolian fragmentation can produce the particle size frequency distribution of sand and dust observed on Mars.

 

Monday, March 16, 2020

[M155]
CERES AND VESTA:  RISE OF THE DWARF PLANETS!

2:30 p.m.   Montgomery Ballroom

Chairs:  Paul Schenk and Jennifer Scully

 

Monday Orals   Tuesday Orals   Wednesday Orals   Thursday Orals   Friday Orals

 

Tuesday Posters   Thursday Posters   Back to Top

 

Times

Authors (*Denotes Presenter)

Abstract Title and Summary

2:30 p.m.

Raymond C. A. *   Ermakov A. I.   Castillo-Rogez J. C.   Marchi S.   Johnson B. C.   et al.

Impact-Driven Mobilization of Deep Crustal Brines on Dwarf Planet Ceres [#2621]
Ceres harbors brines / Lingering beneath the surface / Habitable niches?

2:45 p.m.

Castillo-Rogez J. C. *   Melwani Daswani M.   Sori M. M.   Stein N. T.   Ehlmann B. E.   et al.

Rock Thermal Metamorphism as a Late Source of Fluids and Heat to the Hydrospheres of Volatile-Rich Bodies [#2987]
We address the role of rock metamorphism as a potential late source of heat and fluids that could affect the thermal and chemical evolution of ocean worlds.

3:00 p.m.

Sori M. M. *   Bland M. T.   Byrne S.   Castillo-Rogez J. C.   Ermakov A. I.   et al.

An Ice Shell on Ceres [#1651]
We show that Ceres’ crust may have much higher ice content than previously thought. Implications for planetary differentiation and heat flow are discussed.

3:15 p.m.

Zeilnhofer M. F. *   Barlow N. G.

A Global Analysis of Impact Craters on Ceres and Their Implications for Crustal Strength [#1236]
The investigations of crater morphometries and morphologies will help to identify crustal strength variations across the surface of Ceres.

3:30 p.m.

Michalik T. *   Otto K.   Jaumann R.

Geomorphologic Setting of Pitted Terrains on Vesta and Implications for Their Formation [#1958]
We describe the geomorphologic setting of six pitted terrains, linking them to the emplacement and accumulation of ejecta due to downslope movement.

3:45 p.m.

Scully J. E. C. *   Carey E. M.   Poston M. J.   Baker S. R.   Castillo-Rogez J. C.   et al.

Can a Short-Lived, Debris-Flow-Like Process Form Curvilinear Gullies, Lobate Deposits, and Pitted Terrain on Vesta and Ceres? [#1638]
Using laboratory experiments, we evaluate the hypothesis that curvilinear gullies and lobate deposits were formed by a short-lived, debris-flow-like process.

4:00 p.m.

Buczkowski D. L. *   Schmidt B. E.   Landis M.   Sizemore H. G.   Scully J. E. C.   et al.

Fractures and Furrows on Lobate Flows in Occator Crater, Ceres:  Morphologic Evidence of Ice Content [#1737]
Multiple lobate flows are observed on the floor of Occator Crater. We suggest that their morphology is consistent with terrestrial “rock glaciers.”

4:15 p.m.

Cheng H. C. J. *   Klimczak C.

Opening-Mode Fractures are an Alternative Explanation for Large-Scale Troughs on Asteroid 4 Vesta [#1002]
Our geological observations and the estimated rock strength are consistent with an opening-mode fracture origin for large-scale troughs on Vesta.

4:30 p.m.

Wilner J. A. *   Evans A. J.   Milliken R. E.   Sori M. M.

Spectroscopy of Domes on Ceres and Implications for Emplacement [#2798]
Solid-state flow or / Ceres cryovolcanoes? / Check out these spectra!

 

Monday, March 16, 2020

[M160]
NASA HEADQUARTERS BRIEFING

5:30 p.m.   Waterway Ballroom 4, 5, and 6

Followed immediately by opening of exhibits.

 

Monday Orals   Tuesday Orals   Wednesday Orals   Thursday Orals   Friday Orals

 

Tuesday Posters   Thursday Posters   Back to Top

 

 

Tuesday, March 17, 2020

[T201]
PLANETARY VOLCANISM:  THE FIRE RISES

8:30 a.m.   Waterway Ballroom 1

Chairs:  Candice Bedford and Paul Byrne

 

Monday Orals   Tuesday Orals   Wednesday Orals   Thursday Orals   Friday Orals

 

Tuesday Posters   Thursday Posters   Back to Top

 

Times

Authors (*Denotes Presenter)

Abstract Title and Summary

8:30 a.m.

Ganesh I. *   McGuire L.   Carter L. M.

Pyroclastic Flow Deposition on Venus [#1750]
Are pyroclastic flows primarily driven by gravity on Venus? We use 2D gravity-flow models to simulate pyroclastic flow transport under Venus conditions.

8:45 a.m.

Morgan G. A. *   Campbell B. A.   Jozwiak L. M.   Bramson A. M.   Patterson G. W.   et al.

Fine-Scale Mapping of Mare Flow Units with Mini-Rf Bistatic Data [#2733]
Here we document a new radar based approach to conducting fine-scale mapping of mare flows.

9:00 a.m.

Sutton S. S. *   Richardson J. A.   Whelley P. W.   Hamilton C. W.   Scheidt S. P.   et al.

The Onset of Degradation of a Large Spatter Rampart in Iceland [#1527]
High-resolution topographic analysis relates the construction of a large spatter rampart to the early stages of degradation and morphologic evolution.

9:15 a.m.

Barton K. J. *   Christiansen E. H.   Cowan C.   Hurst M.

Links Between Eruptive Styles, Magmatic Evolution, and Morphology of Basaltic Shield Volcanoes:  Snake River Plain, Idaho [#2545]
Contrast volcanoes / Tall and steep or broad and flat / Spatter, bubble, ooze.

9:30 a.m.

Bedford C. C. *   Rampe E. B.   Thorpe M. T.   Ewing R.   Horgan B.   et al.

Identifying the Products of Volcano-Ice Interaction in Basaltic Sediments in Iceland and Their Implications for Mars [#2478]
A study using rover techniques investigates how the products of glaciovolcanism are distributed in an Icelandic sedimentary system to aid Mars research.

9:45 a.m.

Bates A. R. *   Karunatillake S.   Goossens S.   Ohja L.   Hood D. R.   et al.

Evidence for Supervolcanic Resurfacing in Arabia Terra, Mars [#1588]
Geochemical evidence coupled with geophysical modeling of crustal parameters indicate a region in Arabia Terra was subject to volcanic resurfacing.

10:00 a.m.

Moitra P. *   Andrews-Hanna J. C.   Horvath D. G.

Exploring the Mechanism Behind the Most Recent Explosive Volcanic Eruption on Mars:  Volatile Source and Impact Triggering [#1867]
This study investigates the roles of magmatic and external volatiles on the dynamics of a very recent explosive eruption in the Elysium Planitia, Mars.

10:15 a.m.

Schmidt M. E. *   Churchill J. J. C.   Tornabene L. L.

Volcano Collapse on Mars:  A Possible Source for Sediments in Gale Crater? [#2285]
Eruptions construct / Mass waste forms void and hills / Sediments go on?

10:30 a.m.

Bernhardt H. *   Williams D. A.   Klimczak C.

Mars’ Oldest and Largest Caldera Pityusa Patera — Unique Deposits Hint at Magma Chamber at Crust-Mantle Boundary [#1087]
Folded material in Pityusa Patera indicates compression caused by subsidence during caldera formation. Material extent allows estimation of magma chamber depth.

10:45 a.m.

Ostwald A. M. *   Udry A.   Gazel E.   Payré V.

Assimilation-Fractional Crystallization on Mars as a Formation Process for Felsic Rocks [#2200]
Assimilation-Fractional Crystallization modeling using known martian compositions to constrain the role of assimilation in martian crustal diversity.

11:00 a.m.

Quick L. C. *   Fagents S. A.   Beyer R. A.   Beddingfield C. B.   Nunez K. A.   et al.

Cryolava Dome-Forming Eruptions on Europa and Inferences for the Evolution of Crustal Fluid Reservoirs [#2183]
Europa cryolava dome emplacement while a constant volume of fluid is erupting at the vent and conditions in crustal fluid reservoirs that facilitate eruptions.

11:15 a.m.

Tate C. D. *   Rathbun J. A.   Hayes A. G.

Large Volcanic Outbursts on Io Measured from Ground-Based Observing [#2941]
The 2019 Io observing campaign witnessed two of the highest half-dozen outburst events seen to-date.

11:30 a.m.

Rathbun J. A. *   Mura A.   Adriani A.   Tosi F.   Lopes R. M. C.

Spatial and Temporal Variations in Io’s Active Volcanoes:  Insights from JUNO JIRAM Data [#2301]
(1) Volcanoes on Io / Juno will tell if they are / Different at poles; (2) Io mystery / Polar volcanoes obscured / Juno sees them all #teamIo.

 

Tuesday, March 17, 2020

[T202]
SPECIAL SESSION:  RYUGU AND BENNU:  CONNECTING GEOLOGY AND RETURNED SAMPLES

8:30 a.m.   Waterway Ballroom 4

Chairs:  Hannah Kaplan and Seiji Sugita

 

Monday Orals   Tuesday Orals   Wednesday Orals   Thursday Orals   Friday Orals

 

Tuesday Posters   Thursday Posters   Back to Top

 

Times

Authors (*Denotes Presenter)

Abstract Title and Summary

8:30 a.m.

Okada T. *   Fukuhara T.   Tanaka S.   Taguchi M.   Arai T.   et al.

Unveiling Highly-Porous Nature of Primitve Asteroid 162173 Ryugu by Thermal Imager on Hayabusa2 [#1352]
One-rotation high-resolution global thermal imaging of Ryugu revealed low thermal inertia of surface materials even for boulders, indicating porous nature.

8:45 a.m.

Jawin E. R. *   Walsh K. J.   McCoy T. J.   Connolly H. C. Jr.   Ryan A. J.   et al.

The Geology of (101955) Bennu from the First Year of OSIRIS-REx Observations:  Diverse Boulders and Recent Mass Movement [#1201]
Over a year of Bennu observations reveal diverse boulders that indicate parent body processing, as well as global mass movement towards the equator.

9:00 a.m.

Miyamoto H. *   Hemmi R.   Kikuchi H.   Komatsu G.   Honda C.   et al.

Geological Characteristics and History of Asteroid Ryugu [#1985]
Geology of Ryugu indicates that it is a pile of unconsolidated rubble, whose large-scale features were inherited at an earlier stage of its formation.

9:15 a.m.

Sugimoto C. *   Tatsumi E.   Sugita S.   Yokota Y.   Morota T.   et al.

Morphological and Spectral Analysis of S-Type Bright Boulders on Ryugu [#1770]
Asteroid Ryugu has small distinctively bright boulders with S-type spectral properties on its surface. We investigated their spectral variety and morphology.

9:30 a.m.

Riu L. *   Sugimoto C.   Tatsumi E.   Sakatani N.   Shimaki Y.   et al.

Multi-Instrumental Characterization of Bright Areas at the Surface of Asteroid Ryugu as Detected by the NIRS3 Instrument On Board Hayabusa2 [#1180]
We present here a characterization of brighter areas detected at the surface of Ryugu with NIR, visible, and TIR spectroscopy and imagery.

9:45 a.m.

Hamilton V. E. *   Simon A. A.   Kaplan H. H.   Christensen P. R.   Reuter D. C.   et al.

VNIR and TIR Spectral Characteristics of (101955) Bennu from OSIRIS-REx Detailed Survey and Reconnaissance A Observations [#1049]
OSIRIS-REx spectral observations reveal previously unseen variability on asteroid Bennu attributable to carbon-bearing compounds and dominant particle size.

10:00 a.m.

Kaplan H. H. *   Simon A. A.   Emery J. P.   Campins H.   Sandford S. A.   et al.

Evidence of Organics and Carbonates on (101955) Bennu [#1050]
Spectral detection of organics, carbonates on Bennu’s surface.

10:15 a.m.

Matsuoka M. *   Iwamori H.   Usui T.   Domingue D.   Kitazato K.   et al.

Clustering Analysis of NIRS3 Infrared Spectral Data of Ryugu [#1724]
The cluster analysis results show Ryugu’s NIR spectral heterogeneities, and suggest mineralogical and/or physical property varieties within Ryugu’s surface.

10:30 a.m.

Michel P. *   Ballouz R.-L.   Barnouin O. S.   Walsh K. J.   Jutzi M.   et al.

Formation of Bennu and Ryugu:  Modeling the Contribution of Material from the Projectile that Disrupted Their Parent Body [#1451]
We investigate whether the catastrophic disruptions at the origin of Bennu and Ryugu lead to impactor material incorporation in the aggregates forming them.

10:45 a.m.

Walsh K. J. *   Ballouz R.-L.   Bottke W. F.   Avdellidou C.   Connolly H. C. Jr.   et al.

Likelihood for Rubble-Pile Near-Earth Asteroids to be 1st or Nth Generation:  Focus on Bennu and Ryugu [#2253]
Here we try to determine the likelihood of any small NEA being a 1st generation rubble pile, or an Nth generation.

11:00 a.m.

Ogawa K. *   Arakawa M.   Wada K.   Kadono T.   Shirai K.   et al.

Initial Results of Hayabusa2 Impact Experiment and Observations of Impact Ejecta and Crater [#1341]
Hayabusa2 conducted the artificial impact experiment on asteroid Ryugu on April 5, 2019. Results of operations and initial data analyses are reported.

11:15 a.m.

Tachibana S. *   Sawada H.   Okazaki R.   Takano Y.   Miura Y. N.   et al.

Hayabusa2 Sampling Operations and Expected Samples from C-Type Near-Earth Asteroid (162173) Ryugu [#2027]
Hayabusa2 made two successful landing operations to collect samples from Ryugu. Expected samples from Ryugu will be discussed based on the observation results.

11:30 a.m.

Enos H. L. *   Polit A. T.   Lauretta D. S.   Antreasian P.   Bennett C. A.   et al.

OSIRIS-REx’s Search for a Sample Site:  Selecting the Prime (Nightingale) and Backup (Osprey) Sites on Asteroid (101955) Bennu [#1463]
OSIRIS-REx’s objective is to return and analyze a sample of pristine carbonaceous asteroid. The prime and backup site provide confidence this will be achieved.

 

Tuesday, March 17, 2020

[T203]
LUNAR INTERIOR VOLATILES:  IT’S WHAT’S ON THE INSIDE THAT COUNTS

8:30 a.m.   Waterway Ballroom 5

Chairs:  Bethany Ehlmann and Yang Liu

 

Monday Orals   Tuesday Orals   Wednesday Orals   Thursday Orals   Friday Orals

 

Tuesday Posters   Thursday Posters   Back to Top

 

Times

Authors (*Denotes Presenter)

Abstract Title and Summary

8:30 a.m.

Desch S. J. *   Robinson K. L.

Light Hydrogen in the Lunar Interior:  No One Expects the Theia Contribution! [#2374]
Low-D/H apatite from the lunar interior records solar hydrogen ingassed to the magma ocean of Theia, constraining it to be massive and enstatite chondrite-like.

8:45 a.m.

Grewal D. S. *   Hough T.   Dasgupta R.   Aithala S.

Protoplanetary Differentiation is the Primary Cause of Nitrogen Depletion in Bulk Silicate Reservoirs of Rocky Bodies [#1544]
Protoplanetary differentiation rather than incomplete condensation is the primary cause of nitrogen depletion in the bulk silicate reservoirs of rocky bodies.

9:00 a.m.

Gleißner P. *   Becker H.

Multiple Causes of Siderophile Volatile Element Variations in Lunar Mare Basalts [#1370]
New isotope dilution data on siderophile volatile elements in mare basalts reveal fractionation processes during accretion and differentiation of the Moon.

9:15 a.m.

Tang H. *   Gupta A.   Schlichting H. E.   Young E. D.

Escape from a Transient Rock Vapor Atmosphere as the Mechanism for Fractionation of the Moon’s Moderately Volatile Elements [#1481]
Vapor escape from a thin rock-vapor atmosphere can efficiently fractionate the isotopes of moderately volatile elements in the Moon by vapor-melt exchange.

9:30 a.m.

Aleinov I. *   Way M. J.   Tsigaridis K.   Wolf E. T.   Harman C.   et al.

Transient Volcanically-Induced Lunar Atmosphere and Its Volatile Transport Efficiency [#2675]
We study the ancient volcanically-induced transient atmosphere of the Moon and investigate its possible effect on modern volatile distribution.

9:45 a.m.

Zhang Y. *

Magnitude of Stable Isotope Fractionation in Lunar Basalts [#1320]
I show that the magnitude of stable isotope ratio variability in lunar basalts is controlled by volcanic degassing of volatiles.

10:00 a.m.

Liu Y. *   Ma C.   Housley R. M.

Contrasting Volcanic Gases Between Pyroclastic Eruptions on the Moon [#1166]
Vapor condensates on lunar pyroclastic beads shed light on volcanic gases and lunar mantle evolution.

10:15 a.m.

McCanta M. C. *   Dyar M. D.   Sklute E.

Record of Water Degassing During Magma Ascent [#2251]
Hawaiian glass beads are used as analogues to constrain the degassing behavior of lunar fire fountain eruptions.

10:30 a.m.

Stephant A. *   Anand M.   Tartese R.   Zhao X.   Degli-Alessandrini G.   et al.

The Abundance and Isotopic Composition of Hydrogen in Lunar Melt Inclusions [#1995]
Lunar basalts and their parental melts are highly affected by a variety of processes, namely hydrogen diffusion, shallow degassing, and solar wind implantation.

10:45 a.m.

Robinson K. L. *   Nagashima K.   Shaulis B. J.   Huss G. R.   Taylor G. J.   et al.

Determining the Water Content of Ancient Lunar Basalts from Volatiles in Apatite and Silicate Minerals [#1589]
Coordinated SIMS measurements of volatiles in silicates and apatite in the same lunar sample yield low, internally consistent parental melt water abundances.

11:00 a.m.