50th Lunar and Planetary Science Conference

March 18–22, 2019

The Woodlands, Texas

 

Program and Abstracts

 

ORAL SESSIONS

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

 

POSTER SESSIONS

Tuesday

Thursday

 

PRINT ONLY SESSIONS

Print Only

 

ORAL SESSIONS

Monday Morning, March 18, 8:30 a.m.

Waterway Ballroom 1

Lunar Basins, Impacts, and Regolith

Waterway Ballroom 4

Martian Crustal Column:  Igneous, Metamorphic, and Hydrothermal Processes

Waterway Ballroom 5

Special Session:  New Horizons at KBO 2014 MU69 (Ultima Thule)

Waterway Ballroom 6

Chondrites:  Parent Body Processes

Montgomery Ballroom

Titan:  Releasing the Kraken

 

Monday Afternoon, March 18, 1:30 p.m.

Waterway Ballrooms 4 and 5

Masursky Plenary Session

 

Monday Afternoon, March 18, 2:30 p.m.

Waterway Ballroom 1

Lunar Polar Ices:  Looking Over the Moon’s Cold Shoulder

Waterway Ballroom 4

Special Session:  Going Inside with InSight

Waterway Ballroom 5

Kuiper Belt Objects:  From Pluto to Eris and Ultima Thule

Waterway Ballroom 6

Atmospheres Through the Solar System and Beyond

Montgomery Ballroom

Habitability:  Too Hot! Too Cold! Ah, Just Right!

 

Monday Evening, March 18, 5:30 p.m.

Waterway Ballroom 4/5

NASA Headquarters Briefing

 

Tuesday Morning, March 19, 8:30 a.m.

Waterway Ballroom 1

Ice, Ice, Io

Waterway Ballroom 4

Processes on Modern Mars

Waterway Ballroom 5

Special Session:  OSIRIS-REx at Asteroid Bennu

Waterway Ballroom 6

Planetary Tectonics and Interior Dynamics

Montgomery Ballroom

Mercury:  Magnetism, Magma, and More

 

Tuesday Morning, March 19, 10:15 a.m.

Waterway Ballroom 1

Lunar Impacts and Regolith Processes:  New Exploration

 

Tuesday Afternoon, March 19, 1:30 p.m.

Waterway Ballroom 1

Origin and Differentiation of the Moon

Waterway Ballroom 4

Martian Brines:  Old Salts and New Views

Waterway Ballroom 5

Special Session:  Hayabusa2 Unveiling Asteroid Ryugu

Waterway Ballroom 6

Icy Satellites:  Dynamic Ice Shells

Montgomery Ballroom

Impacts:  Target Earth I

 

Tuesday Afternoon, March 19, 3:15 p.m.

Waterway Ballroom 6

Planetary Aeolian Processes

 

Wednesday Morning, March 20, 8:30 a.m.

Waterway Ballroom 1

Ryugu and Bennu:  Diamond Asteroids are Forever

Waterway Ballroom 4

Martian Aqueous Alteration:  Tracing the Effects of Water Up Close and Far Away

Waterway Ballroom 5

Special Session:  50 Years of Lunar Science:  The Legacy of “One Small Step”

Waterway Ballroom 6

Venus, or How I Stopped Worrying and Learned to Love the Second Planet

Montgomery Ballroom

Space Weathering:  From Samples to Spectra and Everything in Between

 

Wednesday Morning, March 20, 10:15 a.m.

Waterway Ballroom 1

Chondrites:  Organic Matter

 

Wednesday Afternoon, March 20, 1:30 p.m.

Waterway Ballroom 1

Astrobiology:  I Saw the Sign… of Life?

Waterway Ballroom 4

Water on Early Mars

Waterway Ballroom 5

Special Session:  50 Years of Planetary Science:  “One Giant Leap for Mankind”

Waterway Ballroom 6

Ceres and Vesta

Montgomery Ballroom

Chondrites:  Refractory Components

 

Thursday Morning, March 21, 8:30 a.m.

Waterway Ballroom 1

New Lunar Science:  A View from Apollo 50 Years Later

Waterway Ballroom 4

Martian Remote Sensing:  Mineralogy, Morphology, and Chemistry

Waterway Ballroom 5

From Meteorites to Asteroids and Back Again!

Waterway Ballroom 6

Presolar, Interplanetary, and Cometary Dust

Montgomery Ballroom

Impacts:  Processes from Planetesimals to Planets

 

Thursday Afternoon, March 21, 1:30 p.m.

Waterway Ballroom 1

Lunar Petrology, Geochemistry, and Geochronology; from Surface to Interior

Waterway Ballroom 4

Martian Madness:  Roving the Ridges

Waterway Ballroom 5

Differentiation of Planets and Asteroids:  From Cores to Late Veneers

Waterway Ballroom 6

Planetary Volcanism:  A Song of Fire and Ice

Montgomery Ballroom

Small Bodies:  Observations from the Ground Up

 

Thursday Afternoon, March 21, 3:15 p.m.

Waterway Ballroom 4

Martian Surface:  Exposing Carbonates and Hydrothermal Alteration

 

Friday Morning, March 22, 8:30 a.m.

Waterway Ballroom 1

Lunar Volcanism:  Volcanic Features, Processes, and Magmatic Volatiles

Waterway Ballroom 4

Martian Polar Processes and Cryosphere

Waterway Ballroom 5

Impacts:  Frontiers in Shock Metamorphism

Waterway Ballroom 6

Differentiated Meteorite Parent Asteroids and Their Provenance

Montgomery Ballroom

Protoplanetary Disk Evolution and Chronology

 

POSTER SESSIONS

Tuesday Evening, March 19, 6:00 p.m.

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session I:  OSIRIS-REx at Asteroid Bennu

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session I:  Special Session:  Hayabusa2 Unveiling Asteroid Ryugu

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session I:  Chondrites:  Whole Rocks

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session I:  Chondrites:  Alteration Processes

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session I:  Special Session:  New Horizons at KBO 2014 MU69 (Ultima Thule)

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session I:  Kuiper Belt Objects:  From Eris to Ultima Thule

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session I:  Going Inside with InSight:  Global Geophysics

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session I:  Going Inside with InSight:  Seismology

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session I:  Going Inside with InSight:  Landing Site

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session I:  Planetary Interior Dynamics:  Gravity, Density and Seismicity

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session I:  Habitability:  To Explore Strange New Worlds

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session I:  Extrasolar Planets (Those Other Worlds — Promising Untold Opportunities — Beckon)

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session I:  Atmospheres of the Solar System

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session I:  50 Years of Apollo Legacy:  From Origin to Exploration

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session I:  Lunar Remote Sensing I:  New Exploration

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session I:  Lunar Basins, Impacts, and Ejecta

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session I:  Lunar Impacts and Regolith Processes

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session I:  Lunar Volatiles:  From Surface to Exosphere

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session I:  Mercury:  Magnetism, Magma, and More

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session I:  Impacts:  Target Earth II

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session I:  Impacts:  Candidate Structures and Deposits

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session I:  The Horcrux Rings of Saturn

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session I:  Ministry of Icy Moon Compositions

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session I:  Icy Tastic Beasts and Where to Find Them

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session I:  The Cursed Ice

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session I:  The Goblet of Titan

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session I:  Planetary Tectonics and Structural Geology

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session I:  Martian Sample Studies:  Mostly Meteorites

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session I:  Mars Exploration Rover:  Perseverance in Endeavour

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session I:  MSL:  Results Across Gale

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session I:  Martian Orbital Spectral Processing:  Improving Results from CRISM and TES

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session I:  Icy Mars Geomorphology

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session I:  Thing Fall Down Go Boom:  Mars Downslope Motion

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session I:  Planetary Aeolian Processes

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session I:  Education and Public Engagement:  Models, Opportunities, and Products for Engaging Audiences

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session I:  CAESAR and Dragonfly:  New Frontiers Phase A Studies

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session I:  Mission and Instrument Concepts:  Venus

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session I:  Mission Concepts:  Moon

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session I:  Instrument Concepts:  Moon

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session I:  Advanced Curation

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session I:  Mission and Instrument Concepts:  Mars

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session I:  Mission and Instrument Concepts:  Asteroids and Small Bodies

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session I:  Mission and Instrument Concepts:  Europa

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session I:  Mission and Instrument Concepts:  Outer Solar System

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session I:  Mission and Instrument Concepts:  Organics

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session I:  Mission and Instrument Concepts:  Surface and Subsurface Exploration

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session I:  Mission and Instrument Concepts:  Human Exploration

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session I:  Mission and Instrument Concepts:  IgLuna

 

Thursday Evening, March 21, 6:00 p.m.

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session II:  Venus, or How I Stopped Worrying and Learned to Love the Second Planet

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session II:  50 Years of Apollo Legacy:  Interior to Surface in All Its Glory

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session II:  Lunar Remote Sensing II:  Techniques and Advances

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session II:  Lunar Crust:  From Micro to Macro Scale

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session II:  Lunar Basalts:  From Micro to Macro Scale

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session II:  Advancements in Analytical and Experimental Methods

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session II:  Presolar, Interplanetary, and Cometary Dust

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session II:  Genesis

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session II:  Protoplanetary Disk Evolution and Chronology

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session II:  Chondrites:  Refractory Components

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session II:  Space Weathering:  From Samples to Spectra and Everything in Between

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session II:  Small Bodies:  Physical Characterization and Dynamics

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session II:  Small Bodies:  Spectral Characterization and Laboratory Experiments

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session II:  Small Bodies:  Missions and Comets

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session II:  Ceres and Vesta

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session II:  Differentiated Meteorites:  Howardites, Eucrites, Diogenites

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session II:  Differentiated Meteorites:  Ureilites, Aubrites, Angrites, Brachinites, Unique, and Unknown

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session II:  Differentiation of Planets and Asteroids:  From Cores to Late Veneers

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session II:  Impacts:  From Planetary Formation to Modern Experiments

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session II:  Impacts:  Shock Metamorphism and Geochronology

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session II:  Impacts:  Mars and Beyond

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session II:  Mars from Orbit:  Spectroscopy and Landing Sites

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session II:  Mars from Orbit:  Non-Spectral Instruments and Methods

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session II:  MSL:  Vera Rubin Ridge Results

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session II:  MSL:  Rover Methods

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session II:  Martian Laboratory Results:  Formation, Alteration, and Detection of Minerals

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session II:  Mars Geomorphology

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session II:  Planetary Polar Processes and Cryospheres

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session II:  Mars Mud Volcanos:  Mud, Mud, Glorious Mud

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session II:  Mars Volcanology

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session II:  Planetary Volcanism:  A Song of Fire and Ice

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session II:  Mars Analogs:  Volcanic and Hydrothermal Processes

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session II:  Mars Analogs:  Sedimentary Processes

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session II:  Mars Analogs:  Visible/Near-Infrared Spectroscopy

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session II:  Analogs for the Moon and Other Airless Bodies

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session II:  Planetary Simulants

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session II:  Geologic Mapping Through the Solar System

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session II:  Visualizing Worlds:  Planetary Spatial Data and Infrastructure

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session II:  Visualizing Worlds:  Moon and Asteroids Spatial Data

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session II:  Visualizing Worlds:  Mars Spatial Data and Infrastructure

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session II:  Visualizing Worlds:  Outer Planets and Satellites Spatial Data and Infrastructure

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session II:  Biosignatures:  To Seek Out New Life

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session II:  Astrobiology Missions and Instrumentation:  Boldly Going Where No Spectrometer has Gone Before!

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session II:  Searching for Meteorites in Weird Places

Town Center Exhibit Area

Poster Session II:  Workforce Development, Diversity, and Inclusion

 

PRINT ONLY

Analogs

Astrobiology

Chondrites and Protoplanetary Disk

Differentiated Meteorites

Education and Public Engagement:  Models, Opportunities, and Products for Engaging Audiences

Impacts

Lunar Science

Mars Geomorphology

Martian Geochemistry and Petrology

Minor Planet Science

Mission and Instrument Concepts

Outer Planets

Planetary Atmospheres

Planetary Tectonics and Interior Dynamics

Planetary Volcanism:  A Song of Fire and Ice

Special Session:  Hayabusa2 Unveiling Asteroid Ryugu

Venus, or How I Stopped Worrying and Learned to Love the Second Planet

 

ORAL SESSIONS

Monday, March 18, 2019

[M101]
LUNAR BASINS, IMPACTS, AND REGOLITH

8:30 a.m.   Waterway Ballroom 1

Chairs:  Barbara Cohen and Daniel Moriarty III

 

ORAL SESSIONS

POSTER SESSIONS

PRINT ONLY

 

Times

Authors (*Denotes Presenter)

Abstract Title and Summary

8:30 a.m.

Bjonnes E. *   Johnson B. C.   Andrews-Hanna J. C.

Exploring the Peak-Ring to Multiring Basin Transition on the Moon [#2026]
We simulate basin formation on the Moon to better understand the surface and interior conditions that affect formation.

8:45 a.m.

Jackson A. P. *   Perera V.   Elkins-Tanton L. T.   Asphaug E.

Puncturing Holes in the Early Lunar Crust with Re-Impacting Debris [#2988]
Impacts puncture crust / Exposing magma to space / But of what size and shape?

9:00 a.m.

Trowbridge A. J. *   Johnson B. C.   Freed A. M.   Melosh H. J.   Graves K.

The Different Formation Evolution Between Mid-Sized and Large Basins [#2468]
Modeling the full evolution of South-Pole Aiken basin to understand the different formation mechanics between mid-sized and large lunar basins.

9:15 a.m.

White L. F. *   Cernok A.   Darling J. R.   Whitehouse M.   Joy K. H.   et al.

Crystallographic and Chronological Evidence for a Large Basin-Forming Lunar Impact at ~4.33 Ga [#2787]
A 4.33 Ga baddeleyite in lunar troctolite 76535 records phase heritage of a high temperature (>2300 C) cubic-ZrO2 precursor suggestive of origin in impact melt.

9:30 a.m.

Gleißner P. *   Becker H.

The Composition of Basin Forming Impactors and Large-Scale Impact Gardening in the Lunar Highlands [#1093]
New data on highly siderophile element abundances in lunar impactites will be discussed with respect to their crustal provenance and inferred time of formation.

9:45 a.m.

Moriarty D. P. III *   Watkins R. N.   Valencia S. N.   Kendall J. D.   Petro N. E.

Mineralogy of Thorium-Enhanced Materials Within the South Pole-Aitken Basin:  Possible Traces of the Lunar Upper Mantle [#2874]
Integrating remote sensing datasets, we evaluate the composition and geology of Th-enhanced materials within SPA. Conclusion:  Exposure of stratified mantle.

10:00 a.m.

Venkatadri T. K. *   Petro N. E.

Analyzing Ejecta Thickness and Mixing in the Crisium and Nectaris Lunar Basins [#1164]
We modeled ejecta composition in the Crisium and Nectaris Basins to select possible future landing sites with abundant surface material from both basins.

10:15 a.m.

Poehler C. M. *   Hiesinger H.   van der Bogert C. H.

The Light Plains of the Lunar Northern Region (45°–90°N) [#2310]
We determined the absoulte model ages for light plains in the lunar northern region and studied their implications for the origin of light plains.

10:30 a.m.

Speyerer E. J. *   Povilaitis R. Z.   Robinson M. S.   Martin A. C.   Boyd A.   et al.

Examining the Impact Process and Regolith Maturation with Temporal and Photometric Observations [#2878]
Newly formed impacts discovered with LROC images provide new insight into the cratering process and the rate regolith matures on the surface of the Moon.

10:45 a.m.

Wang J. T. *   Kreslavsky M. A.   Liu J. Z.   Head J. W.   Kolenkina M. M.

Quantitative Characterization of Impact Crater Materials on the Moon:  Implications for Degradation Processes and Stratigraphic Age [#1262]
Topographic roughness and thermophysical properties of subunits of impact craters give insight into crater degradation and aid stratigraphic age estimation.

11:00 a.m.

Allen C. C. *   Costello E. S.   Hayne P. O.   Paige D. A.

A Time Horizon on the Aristarchus Plateau [#1320]
The gardening rate calculated from km-scale streaks on the Aristarchus plateau is closely comparable to rates estimated from impact modeling and Apollo cores.

11:15 a.m.

Hahn T. M. Jr. *   Watkins R. N.   Schonwald A. R.   Martin A. C.   Robinson M. S.   et al.

Local Geology and Regolith at the Apollo 17 Landing Site from the Perspective of LROC NAC Photometric Analysis [#1976]
We examine outstanding Apollo 17 science questions through photometric investigation of the TLV using Apollo 17 soils and the Apollo 16 LISCT as ground-truth.

11:30 a.m.

Garvin J. B. *   Jones J. S.   Sietins J. M.   Kent R.   Green W. H.   et al.

Volumetric Analysis of Micro-Craters in Apollo 16 Samples via X-Ray Computed Tomography and Laser Confocal Microscopy [#1708]
High resolution X-ray computed tomography of Apollo 16 samples reveals the topology and interior deformation of micro-craters at micron-scales.

 

Monday, March 18, 2019

[M102]
MARTIAN CRUSTAL COLUMN:  IGNEOUS, METAMORPHIC, AND HYDROTHERMAL PROCESSES

8:30 a.m.   Waterway Ballroom 4

Chairs:  Christopher Herd and Julia Semprich

 

ORAL SESSIONS

POSTER SESSIONS

PRINT ONLY

 

Times

Authors (*Denotes Presenter)

Abstract Title and Summary

8:30 a.m.

Semprich J. *   Treiman A. H.   Filiberto J.   Schwenzer S. P.

Low-Grade Metamorphic Phases on Mars as a Function of CO2-H2O Fluid Compositions [#1437]
Phase equilibria modeling is used to calculate low-grade metamorphic phases for likely martian compositions as a function of variations in fluid composition.

8:45 a.m.

Ott J. P. *   Rampe E. B.   Morris R. V.   Treiman A. H.

Chemistry and Crystallography of Diagenetic, Authigenic, and Igneous Potassium Feldspar:  Implications for Sedimentary Petrology in Gale Crater, Mars [#1358]
Sanidine on Mars / The question: how did it form? / Unit cells tell more.

9:00 a.m.

Nekvasil H. *   DiFrancesco N. D.   Rogers A. D.   King P.  L.

Martian Dust:  Contributions of Condensates from Magmatic Gas [#2652]
Martian dust likely contains significant amounts of magmatic gas condensates (halides, oxides, sulfides) and secondary reaction products involving these phases.

9:15 a.m.

Rogaski A. *   Ustunisik G. K.   Yang S.   Humayun M.

Volatilization of Germanium, Zinc, and Lithium in Martian Basalts and Associated Surface Alteration During Fumarolic Degassing [#2864]
Experimental determination of the behavior of Ge, Zn, and Li in the presence of various volatile loads and the associated alteration due to fumarolic degassing.

9:30 a.m.

Yang S. *   Humayun M.   Righter K.   Peslier A. H.   Zanda B.   et al.

A Two Gigayear History of Germanium Outgassing from Shergottites [#1908]
LA-ICP-MS analyses of two ancient shergottites (NWA 7635 and NWA 8159) show a 2Ga year history of germanium degassing from shergottites.

9:45 a.m.

Payre V. *   Siebach K. L.   Dasgupta R.   Rampe E. B.

Using Mineralchemistry in Gale Crater Sedimentary Rocks to Constrain Ancient Igneous Processes on Mars [#2562]
The chemistry of primary and detrital igneous minerals in Gale Crater, Mars, can be explained by fractional crystallization of shallow hydrated crustal melts.

10:00 a.m.

Phillips M. S. *   Viviano C. E.   Moersch J. E.

Plagioclase in Primary Mineralogy of Ancient Crust, Northern Hellas, Mars [#2137]
Ancient Hellas rocks / Reveal plagioclase in / Reflectance spectra.

10:15 a.m.

Liebske C. *   Khan A.

On the Principal Building Blocks of Mars [#1870]
We statistically mix chondritic and achondritic meteorties to reconcile geochemical signatures, geophysical properties, and redox characteristics of Mars.

10:30 a.m.

Griffin S. *   Daly L.   Lee M. R.   Piazolo S.   Trimby P. W.   et al.

New Insights into the Magmatic and Shock History of the Nakhlite Meteorites from Electron Backscatter Diffraction [#1845]
Large Area Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD) has been applied to ten nakhlites to investigate their slip systems.

10:45 a.m.

Paquet M. *   Day J. M. D.   Udry A.   Hattingh R.   Kumler B.   et al.

Fractionation of the Highly Siderophile Elements in Shergottite Sulfides [#1456]
Highly siderophile element abundances in shergottite sulfides seem to be controlled by petrogenetic processes such as fractional crystallization.

11:00 a.m.

Herd C. D. K. *

Reconciling Redox:  Making Spatial and Temporal Sense of Oxygen Fugacity Variations in Martian Igneous Rocks [#2746]
Oxygen fugit / Once molten rock travels space / Mars secrets revealed.

11:15 a.m.

Rahib R. R.   Udry A. *   Howarth G. H.   Paquet M.   Combs L. M.   et al.

Petrogenesis of Enriched and Intermediate Poikilitic Shergottites:  From Magmatic Source to Emplacement [#1428]
Enriched and intermediate poikilitic shergottites have similar emplacement histories but were likely emplaced in different shallow sills in the martian crust.

11:30 a.m.

Balta J. B. *   Castle N.   Ennis M. E.   McSween H. Y.

Widespread Oxidation in Shergottite Magmas Recorded by Exsolved Spinel in Olivine [#1707]
Oxygen rises / Deep in martian olivine / Tiny chromites form.

 

Monday, March 18, 2019

[M103]
SPECIAL SESSION:  NEW HORIZONS AT KBO 2014 MU69 (ULTIMA THULE)

8:30 a.m.   Waterway Ballroom 5

Chairs:  Carly Howett and Kelsi Singer

 

ORAL SESSIONS

POSTER SESSIONS

PRINT ONLY

 

Times

Authors (*Denotes Presenter)

Abstract Title and Summary

8:30 a.m.

Stern S. A. *   Spencer J. R.   Weaver H. A.   Olkin C. B.   Moore J. M.   et al.

Overview of Initial Results from the Reconnaissance Flyby of a Kuiper Belt Planetesimal:  2014 MU69 [#1742]
On 1 Jan 2019, NASA’s New Horizons mission conducted a close flyby of KBO 2014 MU69 nicknamed Ultima Thule. Here we summarize the earliest results of that flyby.

8:45 a.m.

Moore J. M. *   McKinnon W. B.   Spencer J. R.   Stern S. A.   Binzel R. P.   et al.

The Geology of 2014 MU69 (“Ultima Thule”):  Initial Results from The New Horizons Encounter [#2152]
Overview of very preliminary limited-data geological analysis of MU69, with the promise that many new, quite substantial results will be presented at the talk.

9:00 a.m.

Grundy W. M. *   Binzel R. P.   Britt D. T.   Buie M. W.   Cook J. C.   et al.

486958 2014 MU69 Ultima Thule Surface Composition Overview [#2473]
Overview of compositional results from the New Horizons encounter with the small, Cold Cassical Kuiper belt object (486958) 2014 MU69 “Ultima Thule.”

9:15 a.m.

McKinnon W. B. *   Stern S. A.   Weaver H. A.   Spencer J. R.   Buie M. W.   et al.

A Pristine “Contact Binary” in the Kuiper Belt:  Implications from the New Horizons Encounter with 2014 MU69 (“Ultima Thule”) [#2767]
MU69’s contact binary shape provides the clearest view to date of the accretion processes operative in the protosolar nebula and subsequent planetesimal disk.

9:30 a.m.

Buie M. W. *   Porter S. B.   Tamblyn P.   Terrell D.   Verbiscer A. J.   et al.

Stellar Occultation Results for (486958) 2014MU69:  A Pathfinding Effort for the New Horizons Flyby [#3120]
Four occultations were observed by 2014MU69 and the results were invaluable for mission planning and execution of the New Horizons flyby on 2019 Jan 1.

9:45 a.m.

Porter S. B. *   Bierson C. J.   Umurhan O.   Beyer R. A.   Lauer T. A.   et al.

A Contact Binary in the Kuiper Belt:  The Shape and Pole of (486958) 2014 MU69 [#1611]
Two siblings hold hands / Spinning together in the void / Now visited.

10:00 a.m.

Schenk P. *   Beyer R.   Beddingfield C.   Bierson C. J.   Moore J. M.   et al.

Topography of Ultima Thule (2014 MU69) at Local Scales:  Surface Evolution of a Small Primitive Body [#2934]
Bi-lobed orb that rules the night / Ultima Thule is out of sight / Small-scale topography will shed some light.

10:15 a.m.

Zangari A. M. *   Beddingfield C. B.   Benecchi S. D.   Beyer R. A.   Bierson C. J.   et al.

The Mysterious Missing Light Curve of (486958) 2014 MU69, a Bi-Lobate Contact Binary Visited by New Horizons [#3007]
Why no one found a / Rotation period / On spacecraft approach.

10:30 a.m.

Howett C. J. A. *   Parker A. H.   Olkin C. B.   Protopapa S.   Grundy W.   et al.

Colors of (486958) 2014 MU69 as Observed by New Horizons’ Multi-Spectral Visible Imaging Camera (MVIC) [#1982]
First results of 486958 MU69 are presented; it is shown to be red and bi-lobed. The two lobes have a consistent color, while the neck region is less red.

10:45 a.m.

Spencer J. R. *   Showalter M. R.   Lauer T. R.   Buie M. W.   Porter S. B.   et al.

The Search for Moons and Rings of 2014 MU69 [#2737]
New Horizons conducted extensive searches for rings and moons during its flyby of 2014 MU69. As of the time of writing, none have been found.

11:00 a.m.

Weaver H. A. *   Stern S. A.   Britt D. T.   Buratti B. J.   Cheng A. F.   et al.

Comparing (486958) 2014 MU69 to Cometary Nuclei:  Shapes and Surfaces [#2982]
MU69 vs. Cometary Nuclei:  Comparisons of shapes and surfaces.

11:15 a.m.

Protopapa S. *   Grundy W. M.   Olkin C. B.   Howett C. J. A.   Parker A. H.   et al.

Comparing Ultima Thule with Comet Nuclei:  Colors and Composition [#2732]
We compare the composition of 2014MU69 with that of comets to determine which features of comets are primitive and which have emerged because of their history.

11:30 a.m.

Singer K. N. *   McKinnon W. B.   Spencer J. R.   Weaver H. A.   Lauer T. R.   et al.

Impact Craters on 2014 MU69:  Implications for the Geologic History of MU69 and Kuiper Belt Population Size-Frequency Distributions [#2239]
The craters on 2014 MU69, or the lack thereof, will provide information on the evolution of the body itself and the size-distribution of Kuiper belt objects.

 

Monday, March 18, 2019

[M104]
CHONDRITES:  PARENT BODY PROCESSES

8:30 a.m.   Waterway Ballroom 6

Chairs:  Neyda Abreu and Martin Lee

 

ORAL SESSIONS

POSTER SESSIONS

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Times

Authors (*Denotes Presenter)

Abstract Title and Summary

8:30 a.m.

Jin Z. L. *   Bose M.

Hydrogen Isotope Systematics in Ordinary Chondrite Parent Bodies [#1576]
Orthopyroxenes from four ordinary chondrites have been measured for hydrogen isotope compositions and water contents using SIMS instruments.

8:45 a.m.

Shimizu K. *   Alexander C. M. O’D.   Hauri E. H.   Sarafian A. R.   Jacobsen S. D.   et al.

Hydrogen Abundances and Isotope Compositions of Chondrule Mesostases in Carbonaceous and Ordinary Chondrites [#2840]
Heavier H isotopic composition of mesostases in ordinary chondrites than in carbonaceous chondrites due to inheritance from D-rich ice or Fe oxidation by water.

9:00 a.m.

Greenwood R. C. *   Howard K. T.   King A. J.   Lee M. R.   Burbine T. H.   et al.

Oxygen Isotope Evidence for Multiple CM Parent Bodies:  What Will We Learn from the Hayabusa2 and OSIRIS-REx Sample Return Missions? [#3191]
CM chondrites may originate from a diverse range of asteroids or alternatively the CM parent body was more isotopically heterogeneous than previously considered.

9:15 a.m.

Vacher L. G. *   Piralla M.   Piani L.   Marrocchi Y.

Monitoring the Thermal Evolution of the CM Parent Body(ies) with In Situ Oxygen Isotope Analyses [#1862]
We analyzed in situ O-isotopic compositions on calcite in the CM Murchison and Mukundpura in order to track the evolution temperature of CM parent body(ies).

9:30 a.m.

Donohue P. H. *   Huss G. R.   Nagashima K.

Manganese-Chromium Systematics of Calcite in the CM Chondrites QUE 93005 and MET 01070 Determined Using a New Matrix-Matched Standard [#1949]
New synthetic manganese- and chromium-bearing carbonate standards allow us to re-investigate Mn-Cr systematics of carbonates in CM chondrites.

9:45 a.m.

Higashi K. *   Mikouchi T.   Zolensky M. E.

Aqueous Alteration of Enstatite Chondrite Material in the Kaidun Meteorite [#2344]
We studied aqueously altered E chondrite clasts in Kaidun and found two types of altered materials and elongate calcite, suggesting separate alteration events.

10:00 a.m.

Abreu N. M. *   Corrigan C. M.   Keller L. P.   Hezel D. C.   Gross J.   et al.

Primary Nanocrystalline Anhydrous Chondrule Mesostasis:  Limited Evidence of Secondary Alteration in Most CR Chondrites [#3097]
CR mesostases have primary crystalline nanophases, compositional differences between chondrules setting, and lack trends attributable to elemental mobilization.

10:15 a.m.

Brearley A. J. *   Simon S. B.

Behavior of Chromium in Type IIA Chondrule Olivine During the Earliest Stages of Thermal Metamorphism of CO3 Carbonaceous Chondrites:  Insights from Microstructural Studies of Kainsaz (CO3.2) [#1443]
TEM studies of a chromite-bearing vein in a ferroan olivine phenocryst in a type IIA chondrule in Kainsaz contain compositionally-zoned grains.

10:30 a.m.

Hellmann J. L. *   Kruijer T. S.   Van Orman J. A.   Metzler K.   Kleine T.

A New Method for Simultaneously Constraining Cooling Rates and Ages of Ordinary Chondrites via Hf-W Chronometry [#2729]
Cooling rates and cooling ages of ordinary chondrites inversely correlate, indicating that the onion shell structure of their parent bodies was largely retained.

10:45 a.m.

Li Y. *   Rubin A. E.   Hsu W.   Ziegler K.

Early Impact Events on Ordinary-Chondrite Parent Asteroids:  Insights from Northwest Africa (NWA) 11004, a Type-7 Breccia. [#2561]
The twice-shocked NWA 11004 OC has 4-mm poikilitic opx (as in acapulcoites but not type-6 OC); this indicates very high temp. At 4546 Ma, it cooled at <5°C/Ma.

11:00 a.m.

Nakanishi N. *   Yokoyama T.   Okabayashi S.   Iwamori H.

Thermal Histories of Metal Phases in a CH/CBb Chondrite Isheyevo:  Implications from Siderophile Elements [#2253]
We discuss the thermal history of metal phases to understand physicochemical conditions in the early outer solar system where Isheyevo parent body has formed.

11:15 a.m.

Lunning N. G. *   McCoy T. J.   Schrader D. L.   Nagashima K.   Corrigan C. M.   et al.

Metal-Sulfide Segregates from a Carbonaceous Chondrite Impact Melt:  The Ungrouped Irons Lewis Cliff 86211 and 86498 [#2763]
These sulfide-rich iron meteorites provide evidence of much larger scale impact melting on carbonaceous chondrite asteroids than previously recognized.

11:30 a.m.

Anzures B. A. *   Parman S. W.   Boesenberg J. S.   Milliken R. E.

Using Volatile (S, C, H, F, Cl) Contents of Enstatite in Reduced Meteorites to Estimate Oxygen Fugacity and Equilibrium Melt Compositions [#2179]
Reduced meteorites and experiments have trace S, H, C, and F in enstatite. Assuming saturation, S and C can be used to estimate fO2 and volatile content of melt.

 

Monday, March 18, 2019

[M105]
TITAN:  RELEASING THE KRAKEN

8:30 a.m.   Montgomery Ballroom

Chairs:  Morgan Cable and Donald Korycansky

 

ORAL SESSIONS

POSTER SESSIONS

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Times

Authors (*Denotes Presenter)

Abstract Title and Summary

8:30 a.m.

Heslar M. F. *   Barnes J. W.   Dhingra R. D.   Sotin C.   Soderblom J. M.

Latest Wave Detections in Titan’s Kraken Mare as Seen by Cassini VIMS [#2266]
We discover consistent wave motion in Bayta Fretum, a narrow channel in Kraken Mare, in a dedicated survey of the T100-T126 flybys.

8:45 a.m.

Poggiali V. P. *   Mastrogiuseppe M. M.   Hayes A. G. H.

The Bathymetry of Moray Sinus at Kraken Mare [#3148]
We present the bathymetry obtained from the analysis of radar altimeter data acquired during flyby T104 of Titan, during which Cassini observed the Kraken mare.

9:00 a.m.

Farnsworth K. *   Chevrier V.   Czaplinski E.   Soderblom J. M.

Freezing Points of Methane-Ethane-Nitrogen Mixtures Under Titan Surface Pressure [#2672]
This study experimentally explores the liquids viable to freezing on Titan’s surface by investigating the solidus curve of methane-ethane-nitrogen mixtures.

9:15 a.m.

Hanley J. *   Groven J. J.   Grundy W. M.   Dustrud S.   Engle A. E.   et al.

Characterization of Possible Two Liquid Layers in Titan Seas [#1712]
Two liquid layers / Exist at depth in the seas / Of the moon Titan.

9:30 a.m.

Dhingra R. D. *   Barnes J. W.   Hedman M. H.   Radebaugh J.

Constraints on Titan Lake Similarities from their Shapes [#2898]
We use ‘form follows process’ to quantify shapes of Titan’s lakes to hash out the probable formation scenarios.

9:45 a.m.

Czaplinski E. C. *   Farnsworth K. K.   Chevrier V. F.

Experimental Study of Ethylene and Benzene Evaporites Under Titan Conditions [#1153]
Updated chamber / Gives new insights to Titan’s / Evaporation.

10:00 a.m.

Cable M. L. *   Vu T. H.   Maynard-Casely H. E.   Hodyss R.

Molecular Minerals on Titan:  A New Co-Crystal Between Acetylene and Butane [#1477]
Around Titan’s lakes / Butane and acetylene / A co-crystal make!

10:15 a.m.

Malaska M. J. *   Lopes R. M. C.   Hayes A.   Schoenfeld A.   Verlander T.   et al.

An Updated Organic Inventory Estimate for Titan [#1711]
Organic airfall / Covering Titan’s surface / How much is down there?

10:30 a.m.

Gregg T. K. P. *   Sakimoto S. E. H.

On the Evolution of Titan’s Slot Canyons:  Preliminary Analyses Using Fluid Dynamics [#2743]
Titan’s methane flows / Eroding and transporting / Sediment slowly.

10:45 a.m.

Matulka P. R. *   Levy J. S.   Burr D. M.   Maue A. D.

Rounding and Comminution Rates of Ice Clasts Using the Titan Tumbler:  Fluctuating Roundness and Stepped Mass Loss [#1490]
Tumbling clasts of ice / Comminution and rounding / Cryogenic cracks.

11:00 a.m.

Yu X. *   Hörst S. M.   He C.   McGuiggan P.

Direct Measurement of Single Particle Electrostatic Forces Between Titan Sand Analogs Using Atomic Force Microscopy [#2042]
Organic sand on Titan / Contacting and rubbing / Could it produce electrostatic forces?

11:15 a.m.

Lalich D. E. *   Hayes A. G.

Classification and Degradation State of Mountainous Terrains on Titan from Cassini RADAR [#2797]
Newly processed Cassini RADAR altimetry enables a fresh perspective on Titan’s mountainous terrain.

11:30 a.m.

MacKenzie S. M. *   Lorenz R. D.   Lora J. M.

A Thermal Inertia Map of Titan and the Effects on a Dry Climate [#2999]
Some places heat fast / Some places heat slow — we think. / Dry atmo cares not.

 

Monday, March 18, 2019

[M150]
MASURSKY PLENARY SESSION

1:30 p.m.   Waterway Ballrooms 4 and 5

Chairs:  Louise Prockter and Eileen Stansbery

 

ORAL SESSIONS

POSTER SESSIONS

PRINT ONLY

 

 

Monday, March 18, 2019

[M151]
LUNAR POLAR ICES:  LOOKING OVER THE MOON’S COLD SHOULDER

2:30 p.m.   Waterway Ballroom 1

Chairs:  Anthony Colaprete and Kathy Mandt

 

ORAL SESSIONS

POSTER SESSIONS

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Times

Authors (*Denotes Presenter)

Abstract Title and Summary

2:30 p.m.

Costello E. S. *   Ghent R. R.   Lucey P. G.

Impact Gardening on the Moon and Mercury:  The Source, Age, and Depth to Ice at the Poles [#1991]
Moon and Mercury / Icy poles so different / Broken by impacts.

2:45 p.m.

Kulchitsky A. V. *   Hurley D. M.   Johnson J. B.

Discrete Element Monte Carlo Meso-Scale Volatile Thermo-Diffusion Model [#2943]
Study presents a model of water migration on meso-scale level to determine macro-scale mass transfer rates of water through regolith under different conditions.

3:00 p.m.

Patterson G. W. *   Petro N.   Keller J.   Mandt K. E.   McClanahan T.   et al.

The LRO Perspective on the Lateral and Depth Distribution of Water (Ice) at the Lunar Poles [#3094]
As LRO looks toward its next extended mission, the polar craters Cabeus and Amundsen stand out for their potential to address key lunar exploration questions.

3:15 p.m.

Luchsinger K. M. *   Chanover N. J.   Strycker P. D.

Using Ground Based Observation of the LCROSS Impact Plume to Investigate Water Ice Stratification Within Permanently Shadowed Lunar Sediment [#3035]
We present an analysis of a family of permanently shadowed lunar sediment models, including water ice content, fit to the LCROSS ground-based observations.

3:30 p.m.

Williams J.-P. *   Greenhagen B. T.   Paige D. A.   Schorghofer N.   Aye K.-M.   et al.

Seasonal Variations in South Polar Temperatures on the Moon [#2852]
Seasonal temperature mapping of the south pole using LRO Diviner shows the amount of water cold-trapping area more than doubles between summer and winter.

3:45 p.m.

Kloos J. L. *   Moores J. E.   Sangha J.   Nguyen T. G.   Schorghofer N.

The Temporal and Geographic Extent of Cold Trapping Regions at the North and South Pole of the Moon:  Implications for Volatile Transport and the Seasonality of Polar Frost Distribution and Abundance [#2471]
We explore the influence of seasonal changes in cold trapping area on water transport, trapping and distribution within PSRs at the north and south pole.

4:00 p.m.

Wilson J. T. *   Lawrence D. J.   Miller R. S.   Garrick-Bethell I.   Siegler M. A.

Constraining the Distribution of Hydrogen at the Lunar Poles Using Lunar Prospector Neutron Spectrometer Data and Ice Stability Models [#3194]
Via image reconstruction, we improved the resolution of the LP neutron data to better estimate the hydrogen abundance in areas hypothesized to contain excess H.

4:15 p.m.

Hayne P. O. *   Siegler M. A.   Paige D. A.   Lucey P. G.   Fisher E. A.

Carbon Dioxide Frost at the Poles of the Moon:  Thermal Stability and Observational Evidence from the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter [#2628]
Shadows in shadows / Collecting comet samples / Why don’t we go see?

4:30 p.m.

Colaprete A. *   Elphic R. C.   Shirley M.

Characterizing Lunar Polar Volatiles at the Working Scale:  Going from Exploration Goals to Mission Requirements [#1120]
This paper provides an analysis of the number and distribution of observations needed to provide the necessary next steps in lunar volatile exploration.

 

Monday, March 18, 2019

[M152]
SPECIAL SESSION:  GOING INSIDE WITH INSIGHT

2:30 p.m.   Waterway Ballroom 4

Chairs:  Katarina Miljkovic and Matthew Golombek

 

ORAL SESSIONS

POSTER SESSIONS

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Times

Authors (*Denotes Presenter)

Abstract Title and Summary

2:30 p.m.

Banerdt W. B. *   Smrekar S.   Antonangeli D.   Asmar S.   Banfield D.   et al.

Insight — The First Three Months on Mars [#3109]
Status and summary of early results from the InSight mission:  Trust my crystal ball? / Instruments remain healthy / Geophysics reigns!

2:45 p.m.

Golombek M. *   Warner N. H.   Grant J.   Hauber E.   Ansan V.   et al.

Geology of the InSight Landing Site, Mars:  Initial Observations [#1694]
InSight landed on a smooth, flat pebble rich surface with low rock abundance, impact craters in various stages of degradation, and eolian bed forms.

3:00 p.m.

Lognonné P. *   Banerdt W. B.   Pike W. T.   Giardini D.   Banfield D.   et al.

SEIS:  Overview, Deployment, and First Science on the Ground [#2246]
This provides first scientific observations of SEIS for Mars micro-seismic noise, atmospheric-generated signals, and surface and subsurface elastic structure.

3:15 p.m.

Pike W. T. *   Lognonne P.   Banerdt W. B.   Calcutt S. B.   Standley I. M.   et al.

Results from the Short-Period (SP) Seismometers on the Mars Insight Mission:  From Launch to Sol 40 [#2109]
The dynamic environment at the InSight landing site has been observed with its short-period seismometers.

3:30 p.m.

Spohn T. *   Grott M.   Smrekar S. E.   Knollenberg J.   Hudson T. L.   et al.

The Heat Flow and Physical Properties Package HP3 on InSight — First Results [#1344]
The Heat Flow and Physical Properties Package on InSight is planned to measure the geothermal heat flow of Mars. First results after landing will be presented.

3:45 p.m.

Banfield D. *   Spiga A.   Newman C.   Lorenz R.   Forget F.   et al.

First Atmospheric Results from InSight APSS [#2699]
InSight sees weather / ‘Round the clock and precisely / First results discussed.

4:00 p.m.

Newman C. E. *   Viudez-Moreiras D.   Baker M. M.   Lewis K. W.   Gomez-Elvira J.   et al.

The Observed Winter Circulation at Insight’s Landing Site and Its Impact on Understanding the Year-Round Circulation and Aeolian Activity in Elysium Planitia and Gale Crater [#2302]
Comparing atmospheric model predictions for the InSight/MSL region with observed wind and aeolian features improves understanding of the key physical processes.

4:15 p.m.

Miljkovic K. *   Collins G. S.   Rajsic A.   Wojcicka N.   Neidhart T.   et al.

Numerical Investigation of Impact-Induced Seismic Signals in Martian Crust [#1503]
Simulations of meteoroid strikes on Mars using iSALE-2D code and connecting impact and target properties with properties of seismic waves generated by impacts.

4:30 p.m.

Plesa A.-C. *   Padovan S.   Tosi N.   Breuer D.   Grott M.   et al.

Using the InSight Measurements to Constrain Large-Scale Numerical Simulations of the Interior of Mars [#3142]
We present how thermal evolution models of interior dynamics of Mars can be improved by the measurements of the InSight mission.

 

Monday, March 18, 2019

[M153]
KUIPER BELT OBJECTS:  FROM PLUTO TO ERIS AND ULTIMA THULE

2:30 p.m.   Waterway Ballroom 5

Chairs:  Jason Hofgartner and Andrew Poppe

 

ORAL SESSIONS

POSTER SESSIONS

PRINT ONLY

 

Times

Authors (*Denotes Presenter)

Abstract Title and Summary

2:30 p.m.

Showalter M. R. *   Buie M. W.   Grundy W. M.   Hamilton D. P.   Kaufmann D. E.   et al.

Potential Implications of the Shape of 2014 MU69 for Interpreting Other KBO Lightcurves [#2132]
The hypothesis that many KBOs are contact binaries (similar in shape to 2014 MU69) has testable implications for the distribution of KBO lightcurves.

2:45 p.m.

Verbiscer A. J. *   Porter S. B.   Benecchi S. D.   Kavelaars J. J.   Weaver H. A.   et al.

New Horizons Observations of Distant Kuiper Belt Objects:  Rotational and Solar Phase Curves of (486958) 2014 MU69 and Other Cold Classical KBOs [#2959]
Kuiper belt objects / Scatter feeble sunlight to / Show surface texture.

3:00 p.m.

Beyer R. A. *   Weaver H. A.   Porter S. B.   Grundy W. M.   Moore J. M.   et al.

Potential Mapping Schemes and Reference Systems for MU69 [#2258]
These are the New Horizons Team’s initial thoughts about how to apply mapping schemes and cartographic reference systems to the bi-lobate contact binary MU69.

3:15 p.m.

Keane J. T. *   Bierson C. J.   Lisse C. M.   Showalter M. W.   Stansberry J. A.   et al.

Gravity, Rotation, and Hill Slopes of 2014 MU69 [#3145]
MU69 / Little gravity, steep slopes / Good skiing at neck.

3:30 p.m.

Lisse C. M. *   Singer K. N.   Fernandez Y. R.   Bauer J. M.   Protopapa S.   et al.

Comets Sourced by KBOs — Comparison of SFDs Derived from Spitzer/Wise JFC Imaging and Pluto and Charon KBO Cratering Rates [#2865]
Spitzer/WISE JF comet and new NH Pluto/Charon KBO size-frequency distributions are similar; another piece of evidence that the populations are genetically linked.

3:45 p.m.

Burgener J. A. *

The Influence of Dwarf Planets on the Stability of Objects in the Kuiper Belt [#3163]
Pluto and other dwarf planets can influence the stability of Classical Kuiper Belt objects causing them to be short period comets.

4:00 p.m.

Hofgartner J. D. *   Buratti B. J.   Hayne P. O.   Young L. A.

Eris:  The Brightest (and Most Active?) Kuiper Belt Object [#1608]
Eris is anomalously bright; it is likely active. We test the hypothesis of atmospheric collapse for its albedo with a numerical model and find that it is unlikely.

4:15 p.m.

Poppe A. R. *   Horányi M.

Interplanetary Dust Delivery of Water to the Atmospheres of Pluto and Triton [#1044]
We use an interplanetary dust dynamics model and a dust ablation model to calculate the deposition of water at Pluto and Triton’s atmospheres from dust.

4:30 p.m.

Buratti B. J. *   Hicks M. D.   Kramer E.   Bauer J.

Discovery of Remarkable Opposition Surges on Pluto and Charon [#1723]
We report on observations of Pluto and Charon when they are fully illuminated, a geometry that will not be repeated for 161 years. Both are anomalously bright.

 

Monday, March 18, 2019

[M154]
ATMOSPHERES THROUGH THE SOLAR SYSTEM AND BEYOND

2:30 p.m.   Waterway Ballroom 6

Chairs:  Edwin Kite and Erika Kohler

 

ORAL SESSIONS

POSTER SESSIONS

PRINT ONLY

 

Times

Authors (*Denotes Presenter)

Abstract Title and Summary

2:30 p.m.

Mills F. P. *   Marcq E.   Yung Y.   Parkinson C. D.   Jessup K. L.   et al.

Atmospheric Chemistry on Venus:  An Overview of Unresolved Issues [#2374]
This presentation discusses the current understanding of atmospheric chemistry on Venus and key outstanding issues.

2:45 p.m.

Korablev O.   Montmessin F. *   Fedorova A.   Trokhimovskiy A.   Ignatiev N.   et al.

Results from the Atmospheric Chemistry Suite (ACS) Experiment On Board the ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter (TGO) [#2838]
Latest results from the ACS instrument onboard TGO over the period from the Science Phase start (04/2018) until the end of the 2018 dust event will be presented.

3:00 p.m.

Kite E. S. *   Steele L. J.   Mischna M. A.

Aridity Enables Warm Climates on Mars [#1360]
A cold-start H2O(i) cloud greenhouse can sustain T > 290K on early Mars for >>100yr in equilibrium with polar/mountain-top ice, but only if the planet is arid.

3:15 p.m.

Warren A. O. *   Kite E. S.

A New Martian Paleopressure Constraint Before 4 Ga from Crater Size-Frequency Distributions in Mawrth Vallis [#1286]
We present a new martain paleopressure estimate before 4 Ga and use this alongside existing constraints in a basic 2-component Mars atmosphere evolution model.

3:30 p.m.

Smith C. L. *   Moores J. E.   Guzewich S. D.   Ellison D.

Visibility and Line-of-Sight Extinction Measurements Within Gale Crater During the 2018/Mars Year 34 Global Dust Storm by Curiosity [#1287]
Global dust storm caused / Low visibility for / Curiosity.

3:45 p.m.

Corlies P. *   Hayes A. G.   Kelland J.   Adamkovics M.   Rodriguez S.   et al.

Ongoing Monitoring of Clouds on Titan [#2776]
We present an update on ongoing monitoring of clouds on Titan, as well as an analysis of Titan’s clouds, including wind profiles of Titan’s atmosphere.

4:00 p.m.

Kutsop N. W. *   Hayes A. G.   Sotin C.   Lunine J. L.   Corlies P. M.   et al.

Titan’s Atmospheric Annuli as Observed by Cassini VIMS [#3080]
We report the detection of annular atmospheric features encircling Titan using observation from the Cassini-Huygens Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer.

4:15 p.m.

Jackson B. *   Adams E. R.   Sandidge W.   Kreyche S.   Briggs J.

A Search for Variability in the Atmosphere of the Hot Jupiter Kepler-76 b [#3167]
Exo-Jupiters / Searing and turbulent worlds / Clouds whorl violently.

4:30 p.m.

Kohler E. *   Ferguson F.   Marcum S.

Measuring the Properties of Forsterite for Exoplanet Cloud Formation and Identification [#2946]
Experiments were conducted to directly measure the evaporation rate of fosterite for use in exoplanet cloud formation models.

 

Monday, March 18, 2019

[M155]
HABITABILITY:  TOO HOT! TOO COLD! AH, JUST RIGHT!

2:30 p.m.   Montgomery Ballroom

Chairs:  Edgard Rivera-Valentín and Heather Smith

 

ORAL SESSIONS

POSTER SESSIONS

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Times

Authors (*Denotes Presenter)

Abstract Title and Summary

2:30 p.m.

Méndez A. *

The Diversity and Distribution of Habitable Worlds [#2981]
We estimate that there are at least five major types of habitable worlds. Those more abundant are harder to detect and those similar to Earth are less common.

2:45 p.m.

Abramov O. *   Brasser R.   Mojzsis S. J.

Comprehensive Modeling of Late Accretion Impacts on Earth [#3181]
This presentation will outline our current understanding of late accretion impact bombardment and discuss its thermal, geochemical, and biological effects.

3:00 p.m.

Moore C. A. *   Smith C. L.   Moores J. E.

Habitability of the Martian Subsurface:  An Ultraviolet Perspective [#2482]
A theoretical exercise to assess the depth into the subsurface at which terrestrial radioresistant organisms can survive under martian insolation.

3:15 p.m.

Chevrier V. F. *   Rivera-Valentín E. G.   Soto A.   Altheide T. S.   Melchiorri R.

Existence of Martian Special Regions Based on the Stability and Distribution of Liquid Brines [#2093]
Deliquescence of brines only occurs for lowest eutectic salts and at high latitudes on Mars, putting strong limitations on the possibility of special regions.

3:30 p.m.

Stamenkovic V. *   Ward L. M.   Mischna M.   Fischer W. W.

O2 Solubility in Martian Near-Surface Environments and Implications for Aerobic Life on Mars [#2784]
We find that brines on Mars could contain enough oxygen for microbes to breathe.

3:45 p.m.

Smith H. D. *   Duncan A. G.   Schuerger A. C.   McKay C. P.

Changes in Phospholipid Content of Hypersaline Crust After Exposure to Mars Simulated Conditions [#2870]
This study looked at the changes in PLFA content in a microbial community within a salt crust exposed to simulated martain conditions.

4:00 p.m.

Craig P. I. *   Mickol R. L.   Marnocha C. L.   Kral T. A.

Clay Minerals:  A Martian Microbe’s Favorite Snack [#2522]
Methanogens can grow on Mars-relevant clay minerals without supplemental media, suggesting Noachian Mars could potentially have supported microbial life.

4:15 p.m.

Yazdani A. *   Nepal S.   Chevrier V. F.   Kumar P.

Adaptive Evolution of Bacteria to High Concentrations of Magnesium Sulfate:  Implications for Europa [#3019]
In this study we explore the adaptive evolution of bacteria to high concentrations of magnesium sulfate, which is the dominant salt in Jupiter’s moon Europa.

4:30 p.m.

Hesse M. A. *   Jordan J. S.   Vance S. D.   McCarthy C.

Oxidant Transport Through Europa’s Ice Shell by Porosity Waves [#1489]
The habitability of Europa’s interior ocean depends on the availability of redox gradients. We study oxidant transport by downward percolation of dense brines.

 

Tuesday, March 19, 2019

[T201]
ICE, ICE, IO

8:30 a.m.   Waterway Ballroom 1

Chairs:  Jonathan Kay and Tracy Gregg

 

ORAL SESSIONS

POSTER SESSIONS

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Times

Authors (*Denotes Presenter)

Abstract Title and Summary

8:30 a.m.

Teodoro L. *   Kegerreis J.   Estrada P.   Cuzzi J.   Eke V.   et al.

The Origin of Saturn’s Rings Revisited [#2802]
Impact simulations of the Saturn’s icy moons with unprecedented spatial resolution allow us to shed light on the Saturn’s rings age.

8:45 a.m.

Asphaug E. *   Emsenhuber A.

Giant Impacts Around Saturn [#1793]
We revisit a scenario for the formation of Saturn’s middle-sized moons via giant impact by taking into account the presence of Saturn in the model.

9:00 a.m.

Gyalay S. *   Dodds K. H.   Nimmo F.

Estimates for Moments of Inertia and Present Day Heat Fluxes of Tethys and Mimas from Their Long-Wavelength Topographies [#1715]
We translate long-wavelength topography into spatial variations of tidal heating via isostasy. This reveals the interiors of Tethys and Mimas.

9:15 a.m.

Wong T. *   Hansen U.   Wiesehöfer T.   Stellmach S.   McKinnon W. B.

Layer Formation and Evolution in Europa’s Subsurface Ocean by Double-Diffusive Convection [#1580]
Europa’s subsurface ocean can be layered by the process of double-diffusive convection, which may affect heat and material transport through the ocean.

9:30 a.m.

Kiefer W. S. *

Io’s Heat Flux and Implications for the Distribution of Tidal Heating in its Interior [#2311]
Galileo observations of Io’s heat flux suggest that 50–75% of Io’s tidal heating occurs in a shallow asthenosphere.

9:45 a.m.

Klimczak C. *   Byrne P. K.   Regensburger P. V.   Bohnenstiehl D. R.   Hauck, II S. A.   et al.

Strong Ocean Floors Within Europa, Titan, and Ganymede Limit Geological Activity There; Enceladus Less So [#2912]
Lots of water makes / The floor strong and hard to break / So not much happens.

10:00 a.m.

Miller K. E. *   Glein C. R.   Waite J. H.   Bolton S. J.

Using D/H Ratio of Water and Volatile Organics to Constrain Thermogenic Processes Inside Ice-Rock Bodies [#3013]
Water, organics / H exchange in heated cores / Varies in extent.

 

Tuesday, March 19, 2019

[T202]
PROCESSES ON MODERN MARS

8:30 a.m.   Waterway Ballroom 4

Chairs:  Alfred McEwen and Lauren Mc Keown

 

ORAL SESSIONS

POSTER SESSIONS

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Times

Authors (*Denotes Presenter)

Abstract Title and Summary

8:30 a.m.

McEwen A. S. *   Schafer E.   Sutton S.   Chojnacki M.

Abundant Recurring Slope Lineae (RSL) Following the 2018 Planet-Encircling Dust Event (PEDE) [#1376]
We gonna rock down to electric RSL and then we’ll take it higher.

8:45 a.m.

Tebolt M. *   Schorghofer N.   Goudge T.   Levy J.

Slope, Elevation, and Thermal Inertia Trends of Recurring Slope Lineae:  RSL Initiation and Termination Points Fall Outside the Angle of Repose [#1561]
We examine the possibility of various wet and dry formation processes of recurring slope lineae by analyzing the physical characteristics of 10,000+ RSL.

9:00 a.m.

Heyer T. *   Kreslavsky M.   Hiesinger H.   Reiss D.   Bernhardt H.   et al.

Slope Streaks on Mars:  Seasonal Dependence of Formation Rates [#1205]
Seasonal variations in slope streak activity were observed at intermediate latitudes as well as at the equator.

9:15 a.m.

Imamura S. *   Sekine Y.   Maekawa Y.   Sasaki T.

The Role of Salt Precipitation for Morphological Features Due to Brine Flow on Mars [#2397]
Results of laboratory experiments suggest that due to salt precipitation within soils, brine flow forms elongated streaks on Mars even at a low flow rate.

9:30 a.m.

Guimpier A. *   Conway S. J.   Mangeney A.   Peruzzetto M.   Mangold N.

A Recent Mudflow in the Nili Fossae Region of Mars:  Morphology and Numerical Simulations [#1900]
Report on a landslide near the Nili Fossae region on Mars whose morphology resembles mudslides on Earth.

9:45 a.m.

Raack J. *   Conway S. J.   Heyer T.   Philippe M.   Hiesinger H.   et al.

Contemporary Gully Activity in Sisyphi Cavi, Mars [#1237]
Study of present-day active gullies in Sisyphi Cavi:  Exact timings, thermal investigations, orientations, and presentation of a potential formation mechanism.

10:00 a.m.

Khuller A. R. *   Christensen P. R.

Evidence of Water-Rich Snow Deposits Within Martian Gullies [#3060]
We present novel visible, spectral, and thermal evidence of decameter-scale, water-rich snow deposits being exhumed within mid-latitude gully alcoves.

10:15 a.m.

Parsons R. A. *   Hemmi R.   Miyamoto H.   Kanzaki T.

Cold-Based Glaciation and Moraine Deposition at Pavonis Mons, Mars [#1762]
Obliquity-induced temperature variations influence the flow rate of an advancing equatorial ice sheet — facilitating ridge deposition on Tharsis Montes flanks.

10:30 a.m.

Soare R. J. *   Conway S. J.   Williams J.-P.   Gallagher C.   Mc Keown L. E.

Possible Pingo and Ice Wedge/Thermokarst Complexes in Utopia Planitia, Mars [#1131]
We discuss martian mounds, whose shape, traits, scale, and spatially-associated landscape features would be expected were the mounds closed-system pingos.

10:45 a.m.

Grimm R. E. *   Michaels T.   Stillman D. E.

Multiphase Thermal Modeling of Martian Recurring Slope Lineae [#1737]
RSL at five sites can initiate as liquid flows with the same ice-melting temperature near 250 K by considering differences in shallow subsurface structure.

11:00 a.m.

Knightly J. P. *   Fusco M. S.   Farnsworth K.   Chevrier V. F.

Temporal Variations of Swiss Cheese Terrain [#2187]
Observations of temporal variations and potential factors influencing the growth rate of Swiss Cheese Terrain on the south polar cap between Mars years 28–34.

11:15 a.m.

Hao J. *   Michael G. G.   Adeli S.   Hauber E.   Portyankina G.   et al.

Variability of Araneiform Spatial Patterns at the Martian South Pole [#2941]
Regional variation in the spiders’ local spatial distribution was discussed. We tried to investigate possible constraints on spider spatial patterns.

11:30 a.m.

Mc Keown L. E. *   Bourke M. C.   McElwaine J. N.   Sylvest M. E.   Patel M. R.

An Investigation of the Physical Constraints on Araneiform Morphometry [#2762]
We present the first laboratory observations of the formation of araneiforms by CO2 sublimation and the results of a survey of araneiform morphometry on Mars.

 

Tuesday, March 19, 2019

[T203]
SPECIAL SESSION:  OSIRIS-REX AT ASTEROID BENNU

8:30 a.m.   Waterway Ballroom 5

Chairs:  Dante Lauretta and Erica Jawin

 

ORAL SESSIONS

POSTER SESSIONS

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Times

Authors (*Denotes Presenter)

Abstract Title and Summary

8:30 a.m.

Lauretta D. S. *   Al Asad M. M.   Ballouz R. L.   Barnouin O. S.   Bierhaus E. B.   et al.

OSIRIS-REx Arrives at Asteroid (101955) Bennu:  Exploration of a Hydrated Primitive Near-Earth Asteroid [#2608]
We report the initial assessment of asteroid Bennu from data acquired during the Approach and Preliminary Survey phases of the OSIRIS-REx mission.

8:45 a.m.

Barnouin O. S. *   Palmer E.   Gaskell B.   Weirich J.   Daly M.   et al.

Investigating the Shape of Bennu [#1744]
We present results on the shape of Bennu, using newly acquired data by the OSIRIS-REx mission.

9:00 a.m.

Susorney H. C. M. *   Johnson C. L.   Barnouin O. S.    Daly M. G.   Al Asad M. M.   et al.

The Global Surface Roughness of 101955 Bennu:  First Results from the OSIRIS-REx Mission [#1429]
Shape model studied / Surface roughness of Bennu / Boulders and craters.

9:15 a.m.

Al Asad M. M. *   Johnson C. L.   Barnoiun O. S.   Daly M.   Palmer E.   et al.

How Good are Our Efforts? Evaluating the Stereophotoclinometry (SPC)-Derived Shape Model of Asteroid Bennu [#1495]
We present a summary of our efforts for assessing and evaluating the shape models produced by stereophotoclinometric (SPC) models of asteroid Bennu.

9:30 a.m.

Scheeres D. J. *   McMahon J. W.   French A. S.   Brack D. N.   Leonard J.   et al.

The Gravity and Global Geophysical Environment of (101955) Bennu [#1496]
The global geophysical implications and interpretations of Bennu’s estimated mass, shape, and spin state are discussed.

9:45 a.m.

Rizk B. *   DellaGiustina D. N.   Golish D. R.   Bennett C. A.   Drouet d’Aubigny C.   et al.

Results from Early Resolved Images of Asteroid Bennu [#1717]
The OSIRIS-REx Camera Suite (OCAMS) PolyCam and MapCam early images of Bennu reveal a fascinating small body.

10:00 a.m.

Walsh K. J. *   Jawin E. R.   McCoy T.   Connolly H. C. Jr.   Lauretta D. S.   et al.

Bennus’ Global Geology [#1898]
A global overview of the geology of NEA Bennu, including its craters, boulders, linear features, and regolith.

10:15 a.m.

Ballouz R.-L. *   Walsh K. J.   Schwartz S. R.   Baresi N.   Barnouin O. S.   et al.

Crater Erasure on Small Bodies:  Synthesizing Dynamical Surface Processes in Bennu’s Journey to Near-Earth Space [#1642]
Impacts and spin-up / Move grains on Bennu’s surface / Craters disappear.

10:30 a.m.

Jawin E. R. *   Walsh K. J.   Barnouin O. S.   McCoy T. J.   Ballouz R.-L.   et al.

The Geology of Bennu’s Biggest Boulders [#1577]
The largest boulders on Bennu are diverse in their apparent lithology and local geologic setting.

10:45 a.m.

Molaro J. L. *   Delbo M.   Ballouz R.-L.   Jawin E.   Walsh K.   et al.

Fracture Formation Mechanisms on Bennu and Evidence of Thermally Driven Breakdown [#1597]
We relate numerical simulations to observations to explore the role that thermally induced stresses play in the development of fractures on Bennu’s surface.

11:00 a.m.

Emery J. P. *   Rozitis B.   Christensen P. R.   Hamilton V. E.   Simon A. A.   et al.

Thermophysical Properties of (101955) Bennu from OSIRIS-REx Observations [#2582]
Full-disk thermal observations of Bennu from OSIRIS-REx are analyzed to derive thermophysical properties of Bennu’s surface.

11:15 a.m.

Hamilton V. E. *   Simon A. A.   Christensen P. R.   Reuter D. C.   Della Giustina D. N.   et al.

VNIR and TIR Spectral Characteristics of (101955) Bennu from OSIRIS-REx Approach and Preliminary Survey Observations [#1956]
VNIR and TIR spectrometers onboard OSIRIS-REx have revealed evidence of hydrated phases across the surface of asteroid (101955) Bennu.

11:30 a.m.

Simon A. A. *   Reuter D. C.   Howell E. S.   Clark B. E.   Hamilton V. E.   et al.

Disk-Integrated Hydrated Mineral Features on (101955) Bennu with OVIRS [#1244]
Hello, small Bennu! / Hydration seen everywhere / What secrets await?

 

Tuesday, March 19, 2019

[T204]
PLANETARY TECTONICS AND INTERIOR DYNAMICS

8:30 a.m.   Waterway Ballroom 6

Chairs:  Robert Anderson and Debra Buczkowski

 

ORAL SESSIONS

POSTER SESSIONS

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Times

Authors (*Denotes Presenter)

Abstract Title and Summary

8:30 a.m.

Anderson R. C. *   Dohm J. M.   Siwabessy A.   Schroeder J. F.

Unraveling the Complex Tectonic History of the Memnonia-Sirenum Region:  A Window into the Early Formation of the Tharsis Rise [#1907]
A detailed reconstruction of the tectonic history of the Memnonia-Sirenum region of Mars is presented here through a new 1:5,000,000-scale USGS map.

8:45 a.m.

Citron R. I. *   Manga M.

Superplume Formation on Mars Following a Giant Impact [#1322]
We examine if following a giant impact on early Mars, a superplume could develop in the hemisphere opposite the impact.

9:00 a.m.

Broquet A. *   Wieczorek M. A.   Fa W.

Geodynamic State of the Lithosphere Beneath the Northern Polar Cap of Mars [#1892]
Inversion of the present-day geodynamic state of Mars beneath the northern polar cap using elevation data from MOLA and radar data from MARSIS.

9:15 a.m.

Brennan M. C. *   Fischer R. A.   Irving J. C.

Using Core Formation and Geophysical Modeling to Predict the Core Radius and Seismic Properties of Mars [#1601]
We modeled core formation and planetary structure to explore the parameters of importance for Mars’ core size and the siesmic properties observable by InSight.

9:30 a.m.

Schmerr N. C. *   Kawamura T.   Margerin L.   van Driel M.   Garcia R.   et al.

Measuring the Scattering and Attenuation of Seismic Waves in Mars with the Insight Seismometers [#1644]
Waves grow weak in Mars / What mechanisms drive this loss? / InSight will tell us!

9:45 a.m.

Andrews-Hanna J. C. *

A Taxonomy of Wrinkle Ridges on Mars [#2922]
The topography of wrinkle ridges on Mars was analyzed, yielding three main ridge classes. Inversions of the profiles reveal the underlying geometry of faults.

10:00 a.m.

Clark J. D. *   van der Bogert C. H.   Hiesinger H.   Watters T. R.   Robinson M. S.

Fault Slip Movement Along Wrinkle Ridge-Lobate Scarp Transitions in the Last 100 Ma [#2084]
Age determinations for wrinkle ridge-lobate scarp transisitions reveal seismically induced resurfacing by fault slip events in the last 100 Ma.

10:15 a.m.

Martin E. S. *   Watters T. R.

Evaluating the Mascon Tectonic Model with High-Resolution Topography [#2011]
We evaluate two mechanisms for producing basin-centric graben on the Moon:  (1) Extension due to lithospheric flexure, or (2) shallow-dike-induced dilation.

10:30 a.m.

Yu S. *   Tosi N.   Schulz F.   Schwinger S.   Breuer D.   et al.

Overturn of Ilmenite-Bearing Cumulates Activated by Non-Linear Mantle Rheology [#2115]
We check the rheological conditions needed for lunar magma ocean overturn in the context of non-linear mantle rheology.

10:45 a.m.

Weller M. B. *   Fuchs L.   Becker T. W.   Soderlund K. M.

Geodynamics of Icy Satellites:  Effects of Latitudinal Surface Temperature Variations and Yielding in Thin Shells [#2792]
Icy shells ahoy / Solar insolation drives / Direction of flow.

11:00 a.m.

Chivers C. J. *   Patterson G. W.   Schmidt B. E.

Europa’s Tortured Ridges:  A Case Study [#2474]
Europa’s double ridges are generally considered nearly linear, but those that aren’t may provide insight to other properties and processes in the shell.

11:15 a.m.

Kinczyk M. J. *   Byrne P. K.   Collins G. C.   Patterson G. W.   Bohnenstiehl D. R.

Stress Risers in Enceladus’ Cratered Terrain [#1446]
Enceladus cracks / Reoriented fractures / Are holes the culprit?

11:30 a.m.

Hay H. C. F. C. *   Matsuyama I.

Planet-Planet Tidal Heating in the TRAPPIST-1 System [#1980]
Planet pulls planet / Resulting dissipation / Rests on frequency.

 

Tuesday, March 19, 2019

[T205]
MERCURY:  MAGNETISM, MAGMA, AND MORE

8:30 a.m.   Montgomery Ballroom

Chairs:  Karen Stockstill-Cahill and Edgar Steenstra

 

ORAL SESSIONS

POSTER SESSIONS

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Times

Authors (*Denotes Presenter)

Abstract Title and Summary

8:30 a.m.

Bandfield J. L. *   Osterloo M. M.   Holsclaw G. M.

Thermophysical Properties of Mercury:  Revisiting Mariner 10 IRR Measurements [#2653]
Mariner 10 infrared measurements show evidence of regolith layering, rocky younger craters, and regions of low thermal inertia with similarities to Earth’s Moon.

8:45 a.m.

Dong C. F. *   Wang L.   Hakim A.   Bhattacharjee A.   Slavin J. A.   et al.

A Novel High-Moment Two-Fluid Model for Mercury’s Dynamic Magnetosphere:  From the Planetary Interior to Interplanetary Space [#3267]
We studied Mercury’s dynamic magnetosphere by using a novel high-moment two-fluid model that is capable of reproducing MESSENGER’s observations beyond MHD model.

9:00 a.m.

Plattner A. M. *   Johnson C. L.

Large-Scale Non-Axisymmetric Internal Structure of Mercury’s Magnetic Field [#1645]
We image the non-axisymmetric large-scale internal magnetic field of Mercury from longitudinal components and confirm its pattern using the radial component.

9:15 a.m.

Mouser M. D. *   Dygert N.   Grambling N. L.   Anzures B. A.   Kono Y.   et al.

Viscosity of the Mercurian Magma Ocean:  Implications for Crystal Fractionation and Crustal Petrogenesis [#2030]
Viscometry experiments on a Mercurian composition constrain crystal fractionation and formation of the mantle during magma ocean solidification.

9:30 a.m.

Stockstill-Cahill K. R. *   Peplowski P. N.

Exploring the Geochemical Implications of Terranes Derived from Principal Components Analysis [#2682]
A PCA map / Heterogeneous surface / Mercury’s story.

9:45 a.m.

James P. B. *   Goossens S.   Mazarico E.

Crustal Density Estimation from Line-of-Sight Accelerations at Mercury [#2458]
We use Line-of-Sight (LOS) acceleration residuals from the lowest orbits of the MESSENGER spacecraft to estimate the bulk densities of Mercury’s crust.

10:00 a.m.

Goossens S. *   James P. B.   Mazarico E.   Genova A.

Estimation of Crust and Lithospheric Properties for Mercury from High-Resolution Gravity Field Models [#2202]
We present a new, high-resolution gravity model for Mercury from line-of-sight data, and we use this new model to perform a localized admittance study.

10:15 a.m.

Du J. *   Wieczorek M. A.   Fa W.

Lava Flow Thickness Estimation of the Northern Smooth Plains on Mercury Based on Partially Buried Craters [#1836]
We provide the first estimate of the lava flow thickness for the northern smooth plains on Mercury by modeling the degradation of partially buried craters.

10:30 a.m.

Wright J. *   Conway S. J.   Rothery D. A.   Balme M. R.

Long-Lived, Volatile-Driven Modification of Caloris Ejecta Blocks [#1548]
The circum-Caloris knobs (Caloris ejecta) encroach on craters and scarps that postdate Caloris. Their conical shape could arise from loss of volatiles.

10:45 a.m.

Zharkova A. Yu.   Kreslavsky M. A. *   Head J. W. III

Rarity of Boulders on Mercury:  Comparison with the Moon [#1162]
Boulders on Mercury are rare in comparison to the Moon (~30x). We discuss factors that decrease boulder production and increase obliteration rates on Mercury.

11:00 a.m.

Malliband C. C. *   Conway S. J.   Rothery D. A.   Balme M. R.

Potential Identification of Downslope Mass Movements on Mercury Driven by Volatile-Loss [#1804]
We have identified lineated mass movements on some young slopes. These features are not common and may be linked to volatile sublimation.

11:15 a.m.

Fei Y. *   Tao R.   Yang J.

Constraint on Density Jump at the Inner Core Boundary from Silicon and Sulfur Partitioning Between Mercury’s Inner and Outer Core [#1617]
We present data on melting relations in the Fe-Si-S system to the center pressure of Mercury. Partitioning data are used to constrain the density jumps at inner core boundary.

11:30 a.m.

Vander Kaaden K. E. *   Blewett D. T.   Byrne P. K.   Chabot N. L.   Ernst C. M.   et al.

Mercury Exploration:  Looking to the Future [#1105]
Future of science / Enigmatic Mercury / We need a sample.

 

Tuesday, March 19, 2019

[T206]
LUNAR IMPACTS AND REGOLITH PROCESSES:  NEW EXPLORATION

10:15 a.m.   Waterway Ballroom 1

Chairs:  Makiko Ohtake and Yang (Steve) Liu

 

ORAL SESSIONS

POSTER SESSIONS