Annual Meeting of the Lunar Exploration Analysis Group

September 14-16, 2020

 

Program

 

All times are Eastern Daylight Time (EDT)

 

Monday, September 14, 2020

 

10:30 a.m.

Welcome Address and Community Updates from NASA HQ

12:25 p.m.

Artemis Program Updates

2:00 p.m.

Future Moon:  Decadal Survey Updates

2:40 p.m.

Artemis III Science Definition Team Town Hall

3:40 p.m.

Lightning Round Talks:  Responses to the Payloads and Research Investigations on the Surface of the Moon (PRISM) Request

4:15 p.m.

Posters:  Responses to the Payloads and Research Investigations on the Surface of the Moon (PRISM) Request

 

Tuesday, September 15, 2020

 

11:00 a.m.

Welcome Address and LEAG Steps Towards Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion

11:20 a.m.

Future Moon:  Artemis and Partnerships Updates

1:10 p.m.

Lunar Surface Science Workshop Outbriefs and Breakout Discussions

3:25 p.m.

Commercial Partnerships and Opportunities

 

Wednesday, September 16, 2020

 

11:00 a.m.

Welcome Address and Community Announcements

11:35 a.m.

Technology for a Sustained Lunar Presence

12:50 p.m.

Lightning Round Talks:  The Value of Science at the Artemis Base Camp

1:05 p.m.

Posters:  The Value of Science at the Artemis Base Camp

2:05 p.m.

The Value of Science at the Artemis Base Camp

 

Monday, September 14, 2020

WELCOME ADDRESS AND COMMUNITY UPDATES FROM NASA HQ

10:30 a.m.

Chairs:  Samuel Lawrence and Amy Fagan

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Times

Authors (*Denotes Presenter)

Abstract Title and Summary

10:30 a.m.

Lawrence S.   Fagan A.L. *

Welcome Address

10:40 a.m.

Bridenstine J. *

Opening Remarks and Q&A

11:10 a.m.

Smith M. *   Werkheiser N. *   Glaze L. *

Flipped Panel Community Updates from HEOMD, STMD, and PSD

12:10 p.m.

 

BREAK

 

Monday, September 14, 2020

ARTEMIS PROGRAM UPDATES

12:25 p.m.

Chairs:  Benjamin Greenhagen and Zachary Morse

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Times

Authors (*Denotes Presenter)

Abstract Title and Summary

12:25 p.m.

Noble S. *

Lunar Discovery and Exploration Program and Planetary Science for the Moon Updates

12:40 p.m.

Petro A. *

LunaNet-A Flexible and Extensible Lunar Exploration Communication and Navigation Infrastructure

12:55 p.m.

Bailey B. *

Artemis Science Goals and Objectives

1:10 p.m.

Bleacher J *

HEO Architecture to Accomplish Artemis Objectives

1:25 p.m.

 

Community Discussion Time

1:40 p.m.

 

BREAK

 

Monday, September 14, 2020

FUTURE MOON:  DECADAL SURVEY UPDATES

2:00 p.m.

Chairs:  Kerri Donaldson Hanna and Seiichi Nagihara

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Times

Authors (*Denotes Presenter)

Abstract Title and Summary

2:00 p.m.

Canup R. *   Christensen P. *

Decadal Process Update

2:15 p.m.

TBA 

Update from the Moon and Mercury Panel

2:30 p.m.

 

Community Q&A

 

Monday, September 14, 2020

ARTEMIS III SCIENCE DEFINITION TEAM TOWN HALL

2:40 p.m.

Chair:  Amy Fagan

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Times

Authors (*Denotes Presenter)

Abstract Title and Summary

2:40 p.m.

Weber R.*

Artemis III Science Definition Team Update and Community Q&A

 

Monday, September 14, 2020

LIGHTNING ROUND TALKS:  RESPONSES TO THE PAYLOADS AND RESEARCH INVESTIGATIONS ON THE SURFACE OF THE MOON (PRISM) REQUEST

3:40 p.m.

Chair:  Kelsey Young

One-minute descriptions of posters presented on PRISM

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Times

Authors (*Denotes Presenter)

Abstract Title and Summary

3:40 p.m.

 

Lightning Talks

4:00 p.m.

 

BREAK

 

POSTERS:  RESPONSES TO THE PAYLOADS AND RESEARCH INVESTIGATIONS ON THE SURFACE OF THE MOON (PRISM) REQUEST

4:15–5:30 p.m.

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Authors (*Denotes Presenter)

Abstract Title and Summary

Glotch T. G.   Cahill J. T.   Greenhagen B. T.   Lawrence D. J.   Peplowski P. N.

Granite:  An Infrared and Gamma Ray Instrument Suite to Investigate Silicic Compositions at Aristarchus [#5018]
The Aristarchus region is an ideal target with numerous silicic features. Surface hyperspectral thermal infrared imagery and gamma ray and neutron spectroscopy at a silicic site provides the best opportunity to tightly constrain the mineralogy of lunar silicic compositions, which are rare in the Apollo sample collection. While a static lander might also make direct measurements of Aristarchus pyroclastic materials, which are also of scientific interest, mobility significantly enhances the potential science return. We propose a two-instrument payload at TRL 5 with a combined mass of 11.8 kg and continuous power usage of 13 W. The Compact Hyperspectral Infrared Lunar Imager (CHILI) would provide bulk silicate mineralogy of the landing site over the 5.5–14 µm range. The Gamma Ray and Neutron Spectrometer (GRNS) would provide major and trace element abundances and water equivalent hydrogen content of the landing site.

Donaldson Hanna K. L.   Osterman D.   Dove A. R.   Hayne P. O.   Schindhelm R. N.   Sunshine J. M.   Yingst R. A.

Lunar Vista:  A Spectral Imaging Suite for Surface Science and Exploration [#5010]
Lunar Vista addresses NASA’s strategic plan of lunar exploration with a suite of instruments covering visible through thermal IR wavelengths (~0.4–14.4 μm). Lunar Vista is capable of making panoramic maps of any landing site using three high heritage, multispectral instruments:  (1) VIC, a multispectral visible to near IR camera capable of making polarized observations, (2) SWIPS, a short-wave IR multispectral system capable of mapping volatiles using the 3 μm feature, and (3) TIIR, a multispectral thermal IR radiometer capable of mapping compositional and thermophysical properties. Lunar Vista’s panoramic maps would address key science and exploration goals including understanding:  (A) The formation and evolution of the Moon’s crust; (B) How surface roughness produces small-scale cold traps; (C) The dust environment at the lunar surface; and (D) The composition, distribution, and cycles of volatiles.

Fraeman A. A.   Haag J. M.   Gibson M. S.   Chen W.   McKinley I. M.   Bender H. A.   Thompson D. R.   Mouroulis P.   Green R. O.   Ehlmann B. L.   Blaney D. L.

An Ultra-Compact Imaging Spectrometer for the Moon [#5017]
The Ultra-Compact Imaging Spectrometer for the Moon (UCIS-Moon) is a short wavelength imaging spectrometer that collects reflectance spectra between 600–3600 nm at a spatial resolution from centimeters to meters. Data from this instrument will provide information about the composition of the lunar surface by measuring diagnostic absorptions associated with common lunar minerals, organic compounds, and volatiles that include OH species, molecular H2O, and water ice. UCIS-Moon measurements will address key science questions about the abundance, sources, and sinks of lunar volatiles and provide important information about in situ resources for future exploration. In addition to volatiles, UCIS-Moon will be able to map the mineralogical composition and associated geologic context of the lunar surface. The instrument is currently being matured for inclusion on a future Commercial Lunar lander or rover through the NASA Development and Advancement of Lunar Instrumentation (DALI) program.

Haviland H.   Bertone P.   Christl M.   Caffrey J.   Apple J.

Neutron Measurements at the Lunar Surface [#5039]
Neutron measurements at the lunar surface are performed with two goals:  characterization of the radiation environment and inference of regolith composition. This submission is focused on quantifying the surface radiation environment to inform mission design and risk mitigation prior to crewed lunar missions. The lunar surface radiation environment includes a unique neutron contribution. MSFC’s Advanced Neutron Spectrometer for Lunar Surface Measurements instrument covers the most biologically significant energies from thermal to ~20 MeV. The ANS-LSM is based on heritage from the Fast Neutron Spectrometer that has measured the ISS crew neutron exposure for the past 3 years and revealed the significant neutron contribution to total exposure. The relative contribution from neutrons will increase outside the shielding effects of Earth’s magnetic field. To evaluate the radiation risk to astronauts at the lunar surface, precursor fast neutron measurements are needed.

Sellar R. G.   Donaldson Hanna K.   Kerber L. A.   McKinley I. M.   Wong A. F.

Multispectral Microscopic Imager for Lunar Science and Exploration [#5045]
The Multispectral Microscopic Imager (MMI) combines the close-up view of a microscope with the compositional information obtained from measurements of visible to shortwave infrared (VSWIR) reflectance from each individual pixel in the image, making it useful for scientific, engineering, and ISRU applications. MMI combines the best features of a hand lens and a petrographic microscope:  it provides particle size distributions, microtextures, and spatially-correlated mineralogy for minimally-prepared and unprepared samples, making it suitable for use on planetary landers and rovers, including Commercial Lunar Payload Services (CLPS) missions. The current MMI is a TRL 4 breadboard instrument with spatial sampling of 62.5 µm/pixel and a spectral range of 0.47–1.65 µm. A lunar version would have a spatial sampling of < 20 μm (customizable) and extended spectral range to 2.25 µm, allowing it to spectrally distinguish all major lunar mineral phases present, even at the subpixel level.

Bell M. M.   Curlin P. S.

Construction of Lunar Radio Astronomy Telescopes Leveraging Low-Latency VR/AR Teleoperation [#5036]
Sustainable lunar presence creates a platform for low-latency robotic operations on the lunar surface. FARSIDE, developed by a NASA-funded mission concept study, would place a low radio frequency interferometric array on the farside of the Moon. This mission requires a collaboratively controlled rover to deploy antenna nodes from the lander onto the lunar surface. Leveraging stereo imaging capabilities, we intend to create VR/AR interfaces for both teleoperation and simulated failure recovery. By developing our virtual recovery sandbox, we can create a virtual space representative of the rover’s current state and environment. This provides the ability to troubleshoot problems as if the operator were next to the rover itself. We can then compare our models with traditional control and failure recovery methods. These developments aim to provide a platform for low-latency teleoperated failure recovery, with the focal point on construction of lunar telescopes.

Menon M. S.   Walker M.   Koris D.   Szafir D.   Burns J.

URSSA:  A Simulator for Lunar Surface Telerobotics Research [#5040]
NASA has announced the Artemis and Commercial Lunar Payload Services initiatives as part of its lunar exploration strategy. Robots are critical enablers for these initiatives. They help explore environments hostile to humans and aid in different mission activities. One principal challenge in designing such systems for surface telerobotics involves testing semi-autonomous agents for robust performance in planetary environments. We address this issue by developing URSSA (Unity-ROS Simulator for Space Applications), a simulation framework for planetary surface telerobotics. In this work, we describe how URSSA renders a simulated lunar environment using the Unity game engine. We explain how it integrates with Robotic Operating System (ROS) to simulate and test robot performance (data collection, decision-making, etc.). Leveraging a modular framework like URSSA alongside mission analogues can aid in the development of robotic space exploration systems.

Zacny K.   Chu P.   Vendiola V.   Quinn J.   Kleinhenz J.

TRIDENT (The Regolith and Ice Drill for Exploring New Terrain) for VIPER Rover [#5005]
The goal of the VIPER mission is to capture and identify volatile species within the top one meter of the lunar surface. The TRIDENT drill has been designed to generate cuttings and place them on the surface for analysis by the Near InfraRed Volatiles Spectrometer Subsystem (NIRVSS) and Mass Spectrometer observing lunar operations (MSolo).

The drill is based on the TRL4 Mars Icebreaker drill and TRL5 LITA drill developed for capturing samples of ice and ice cemented ground on Mars and represents over a decade of technology development effort funded by NASA.

To reduce sample handling complexity, the drill auger is designed to capture cuttings as opposed to cores. The drill uses a “bite” sampling approach where samples are captured in ~10 cm depth intervals all the way to 1 m depth. This allows for stratigraphy to be maintained while reducing drilling power and forces.

Kinnersley M. A.

Regolith to Oxygen (ROXY) and Metal Conversion Lunar Demonstrator [#5052]
AIRBUS US and its US academic partners from Boston U. and U. Massachusetts, world leading researchers in the field of electrochemical reduction of metal oxides by molten salt electrolysis, propose an end-to-end lunar demonstration of regolith to oxygen (ROXY) and metal conversion technology. The core of the ROXY technology is based on electrochemical reduction by molten salt electrolysis. AIRBUS US feels this proposal for a Regolith to Oxygen and Metal Conversion demonstrator is an excellent fit to the scientific goals and objectives of NASA to enable sustainable lunar exploration. The demonstrator is also a robust sturdy design, is self-contained with modest demands on the lander and its landing site and can achieve its objectives within one lunar day. Future applications of this technology can easily be scaled to a future lunar-based pilot plant for oxygen and metal conversion, and some aspects can be applied usefully to terrestrial applications e.g. for rare-earth metal extraction.

McCormick R. L.   Kerber L. A.   Dillon R. P.   Fleischner R. E.   Levanas G. C.   Hagman M. J.

Cold Operable Lunar Deployable Arm (COLDArm) [#5020]
The Cold Operable Lunar Deployable Arm (COLDArm) payload would significantly improve the utility for lunar landers by providing manipulation capabilities below 100 K, including during the lunar day and night. Similar to Phoenix or InSight, the arm could be used to collect samples for on-board instruments, deploy instruments, provide lander engineering information with an arm mounted camera, or utilize arm mounted instruments for scientific or ISRU data. COLDArm provides a practical way for a wide variety of CLPS payload elements to reach the surface in the near term, while demonstrating technologies to enable missions to future lunar and Ocean Worlds extreme environments. COLDArm is currently under development in a partnership with Motiv Space Systems. This payload is currently being developed to TRL 6 through the Lunar Surface Innovation Initiative (LSII), managed by STMD Game Changing Development (GCD).

Standley I.   Panning M. P.   Pike W. T.   Calcutt S.   Kedar S.   Nunn C.   Brent Blaes M.   Walsh W.   Badalian M.   Liu J.

The Lunar Seismic Package [#5026]
The Lunar Seismic Package (LSP) evolved from the InSight Short Period (SP) seismic sensor and Back End Electronics (BEE) jointly developed by the team. Using commercial landers, LSP will return seismic data using an on-deck deployment, characterizing lander noise, and evaluating the need for robotic surface emplacement. The SP derived Lunar optimized Sensor Head uses an orientation independent set of Triaxial micromachined silicon sensors and associated front-end electronics. It fits in a 5cm cube and is resistant to pyrotechnic shock and vibration (>30 g rms). The Feedback Electronics provides the force feed-back system. The BEE digitizes the seismic signals, provides calibration and control, stores seismic data, and interfaces to the lander C&DH. Developed as part of an ICEE-2 program for Europa with a test system available in March 2021, this provides a high TRL path. Flight delivery will be overseen by JPL with engineering, qualification and flight models delivered by Kinemetrics.

Mazarico E.   Barker M. K.   Saxena P.   Cremons D. R.   Viswanathan V.   Sun X.

Dynamics, Dust and Regolith Environment, ‘Earth as an Exoplanet’, and Exploration from the Moon Surface (DDRE4MS) [#5044]
DDRE4MS is a PRISM-compatible, high-TRL suite that will address multi-disciplinary goals by placing geodetic and remote sensing instruments on the lunar surface. We will conduct spectro-photometric surveys to characterize regolith properties, provide ground truth to orbital observations, and characterize the near-surface dust environment. We will conduct geodetic observations to further constrain the lunar interior, with a retro-reflector array (for Lunar Laser Ranging) and a laser transponder. Imaging of the Earth with high spatial, temporal, and spectral resolutions is crucial to understand the variations with time and phase of its spectral signatures, a prerequisite to identifying and characterizing habitable exoworlds. Additional capabilities (lidar and lasercom) can support the lander and other instruments.

Blewett D. T.

A PRISM Instrument Suite for a Magnetic Anomaly Landing Site [#5003]
NASA has announced that a CLPS lander will be targeted to the Reiner Gamma swirl in 2023. Swirls are high-reflectance markings that overprint topography and can extend for hundreds of kilometers across highland or mare terrain. Remote-sensing data have contributed to knowledge of swirls, but a full explanation of their origin remains elusive. Hypotheses include impact of cometary material, atypical space weathering, and unusual behavior of levitated dust. The latter two mechanisms invoke the magnetic fields (anomalies) that are present at all swirls. The origin of magnetic anomalies is a separate unsolved mystery. A surface mission to one of these unique natural laboratories would provide key data for testing hypotheses for the origin of swirls and for the origin of magnetic anomalies. We will discuss options for a suite of instruments on such a landed mission.

Eubanks T. M.   Radley C. F.   Blase W. P.

Exploring the Reiner Gamma Swirl Region and the Schrödinger Basin with “Mote” Ballistic Penetrators [#5046]
Space Initiatives developed Motes for the rapid deployment of instrument arrays on the lunar surface, allowing for scientific missions in difficult to reach terrain. After deployment, up to 16 Motes would fall ballistically, impacting at ~300 m/s, penetrating ~1 meter, and implanting instruments over ~1 km on the lunar surface.

The planned CLPS landings in Reiner Gamma and the Schrödinger Basin show the potential for lunar penetrator research. In a swirl region, magnetometers and other sensors could be deployed in swirl boundaries, to determine the role of the solar wind in creating the swirls. The Permanently Shadowed Region in Nefed’ev Crater is next to the Schrödinger Basin; a deployment there would provide compositional and geotechnical data on the icy subsurface PSR material.

Glotch T. D.   Martin T.   Crain T.   Burgess K. D.   Stroud R. M.

Mineralogy Experiment in a Lunar Extreme Environment (MELEE) [#5041]
Space weathering is a fundamental process that occurs on airless bodies, driven primarily by solar wind sputtering and micrometeoroid bombardment. Remote sensing measurements of lunar swirls and laboratory space weathering simulations appear to point to different major contributors to space weathering, suggesting that our understanding of the fundamental processes is limited. Pure mineral standards exposed for an extended time to the lunar environment may shed new light on space weathering processes and disambiguate the relative contributions of solar wind and micrometeoroid bombardment. As such, we propose the Mineralogy Experiment in a Lunar Extreme Environment (MELEE). Incorporation of this simple experiment on a south polar mission will allow up to 3-4 months of spectral measurements before mission end. The experiment will be designed to be easily removed during a future robotic or human mission for return to Earth for detailed laboratory analyses.

Nagihara S.   Grimm R. E.

A Proposal for Heat Flow Measurement and Magnetotelluric Sounding in Mare Imbrium [#5007]
The Procellarum KREEP Terrane (PKT) has a higher proportion of radionuclides near the surface than elsewhere on the Moon. It has been debated, however, whether these incompatible elements were efficiently partitioned into the crust or whether the uppermost mantle also remained enriched. The style of partitioning is important to understanding the Moon’s thermal evolution. A CLPS mission is tentatively targeted to Mare Crisium, which will reveal the thermal structure of the Moon away from PKT. We propose heat flow and magnetotelluric (MT) measurements in Mare Imbrium to further our understanding of PKT. MT produces an electrical-conductivity profile that is sensitive to temperature and composition; heat flow allows these effects to be separated. Because crustal radionuclide concentration is less in Mare Imbrium than the rest of PKT (likely due to excavation of the basin), it is a thermal window to the mantle that will enable us to infer the deep extent of KREEP.

Greenhagen B. T.   Stickle A. M.   Blewett D. T.   Bowles N. E.   Costello E. S.   Cahill J. T.   Denevi B. W.   Ghent R. R.   Goldbert A. C.   Hayne P. O.   Johnson J. R.   Nunez J. I.   Powell T. M.   Prem P.   Runyon K. D.   Williams J.-P.

Exploring the Youngest Observed Regions on the Moon (EYOR) [#5042]
This investigation seeks to study the youngest regions on the Moon – those forming before our very eyes – to answer fundamental, yet poorly understood, processes associated with impact cratering and regolith formation. Our target is the largest of several recent impact craters that has LRO observations both before and after formation. This 73-m diameter crater is located in Mare Humorum on the lunar nearside and formed in October 2012; it is the youngest known crater of its size in the solar system. In addition, the impact event created a thermophysical “cold spot,” an anomaly in the surrounding regolith that extends to 50–100 crater radii. Cold spots have emerged as a fundamentally important class of impact cratering phenomena, due to their widespread prevalence on the Moon and their young ages (< 1 Myr old). This site provides an exceptional opportunity to characterize fresh regolith that has remained essentially untouched by the surface processes that degrade cold spots over time.

Dempsey B. P.   Rafa K. W.   Nie C. W.

A Micro-Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator for Lunar Exploration [#5047]
Lockheed Martin (LM) is proving and maturing a small radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) based on an isotope with less handling and launch approval problems than legacy systems. The RTG generates approximately 100 mW electrical power and 2W of thermal waste heat. Not only does this technology provide continuous electrical power, but it generates thermal energy which can be utilized to reduce the need for dedicated survival heaters. LM has matured the device to TRL 4 by doing lab testing on the electrically heated devise. For the initial demonstration flight, the mission would be able to use these small heater and power sources to potentially allow the lander or a small science package on the lander to survive the lunar night.

Sommers M.   May L. D.   Nie C. W.

A Deep Space Rated WiFi Hub for Lunar Exploration [#5049]
Lockheed Martin proposes an Orion heritage WiFi to enable intercommunication between distributed payloads on the lunar surface. Lunar landers will carry various science packages, sensors, and small rovers to explore the surface. To facilitate the control and relay of data from each of these assets use of a local area network, or WiFi, around the lander as a hub provides advantages. The NASA/LM-developed video architecture for the Orion spacecraft uses a camera controller that provides wireless connectivity using the IEEE 802.11n and 802.11ad standards to communicate with and stream data from multiple cameras. We propose to leverage the Orion Camera Controller to develop a next-generation unit that evolves the controller into a central WiFi hub that can be used on any platform. This provides transfer speeds in excess of multiple Gbps and with a range of approximately 350 feet.

Walker M. E.   Burns J. O.   Szafir D. J.

Virtual and Mixed Reality HMD Interfaces for Lunar Surface Telerobotics [#5031]
Next generation virtual and mixed reality (VMR) head-mounted displays (HMDs) are positioned to reshape space exploration with surface robot navigation and assembly teleoperation missions mediated by VMR HMD interfaces. These stereoscopic interfaces allow operators to embody remote robots and see through an egocentric perspective as if they themselves were at the robot’s location. Additionally, VMR HMD interfaces allow for 3D reconstructions of distant robot environments, providing users an exocentric perspective and the ability to freely inspect and explore the robot setting from viewpoints not restricted to that of the real robots. In our work, we will explore the unification of both exocentric and egocentric perspectives in a single VMR HMD interface to examine overall teleoperation effectiveness and identify optimal use cases for both perspectives. Additionally, we will examine how VMR interfaces can facilitate group collaboration for teleoperation planning and live missions.

 

Tuesday, September 15, 2020

WELCOME ADDRESS AND LEAG STEPS TOWARDS EQUITY, DIVERSITY, AND INCLUSION

11:00 a.m.

Chair:  Sarah Valencia

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Times

Authors (*Denotes Presenter)

Abstract Title and Summary

11:00 a.m.

Valencia, S. *

Welcome Address

11:05 a.m.

Bennett K. *

Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion in LEAG

 

Tuesday, September 15, 2020

FUTURE MOON:  ARTEMIS AND PARTNERSHIPS UPDATES

11:20 a.m.

Chairs:  Noah Petro and Adrienne Dove

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Times

Authors (*Denotes Presenter)

Abstract Title and Summary

11:20 a.m.

Gold M. *

Artemis Accords

11:35 a.m.

 

Community Q&A

11:45 a.m.

Speakers Representing JAXA, ESA, KPLO, ISRO, ASA, and CSA

Updates from International Partners

12:45 p.m.

 

Community Q&A

12:55 p.m.

 

BREAK

 

Tuesday, September 15, 2020

LUNAR SURFACE SCIENCE WORKSHOP OUTBRIEFS AND BREAKOUT DISCUSSIONS

1:10 p.m.

Chairs:  Clive Neal and Brett Denevi

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Times

Authors (*Denotes Presenter)

Abstract Title and Summary

1:10 p.m.

Young K. *

Tools and Instruments Outbrief

1:20 p.m.

Orlando T. Prem P. *

Volatiles Outbrief

1:30 p.m.

Jolliff B. Mitchell J. *

Samples Outbrief

1:40 p.m.

Dove A. Watkins R. *

Regolith and Dust Outbrief

1:50 p.m.

 

Community Q&A

2:00 p.m.

 

BREAK and Disperse to Breakout Rooms

2:15 p.m.

 

TBA

3:15 p.m.

 

Summary from Topic Breakout Discussions

 

Tuesday, September 15, 2020

COMMERCIAL PARTNERSHIPS AND OPPORTUNITIES

3:25–5:10 p.m.

Chair:  David Blewett

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Times

Authors (*Denotes Presenter)

Abstract Title and Summary

3:25 p.m.

Frank E. *

The Commercial Advisory Board Plus Commercial Partner Breakout Room Introduction

3:40 p.m.

 

Breakout Sessions for Commercial Companies

 

Wednesday, September 16, 2020

WELCOME ADDRESS AND COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENTS

11:00 a.m.

Chairs:  Erica Jawin and Timothy Glotch

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Times

Authors (*Denotes Presenter)

Abstract Title and Summary

11:00 a.m.

Jawin, E. *

Welcome Address and Introduction to Community Announcements

11:05 a.m.

TBA 

Community Announcements and Updates

 

Wednesday, September 16, 2020

TECHNOLOGY FOR A SUSTAINED LUNAR PRESENCE

11:35 a.m.

Chairs:  Jose Hurtado and Kris Zacny

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Times

Authors (*Denotes Presenter)

Abstract Title and Summary

11:35 a.m.

Klima R *

Lunar Surface Innovation Consortium (LSIC)

11:50 a.m.

Hibbits C. *

In Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) on the Moon

12:05 p.m.

Colaprete A. *

Volatiles Investigating Polar Exploration Rover (VIPER)

12:20 p.m.

 

Community Q&A and Discussion

12:35 p.m.

 

BREAK

 

Wednesday, September 16, 2020

LIGHTNING ROUND TALKS:  THE VALUE OF SCIENCE AT THE ARTEMIS BASE CAMP

12:50 p.m.

Chair:  Ryan Watkins

One-minute descriptions of posters regarding science that can be achieved at the Artemis Base Camp

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Times

Authors (*Denotes Presenter)

Abstract Title and Summary

12:50 p.m.

 

Lightning Talks

 

POSTERS:  THE VALUE OF SCIENCE AT THE ARTEMIS BASE CAMP

1:05–2:05 p.m.

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Authors (*Denotes Presenter)

Abstract Title and Summary

Barker D. C.

Can Science Sustain a Human Lunar Presence? [#5015]
What scientific goals and disciplines are capable of engendering a secure and sustained presence? To address these questions, a precise definition of the meaning of sustainability is needed. This includes minimum productivity, population, redundancy, financing and resource usage levels, in order to reduce costs while retaining a worthwhile presence. ISS, and Antarctic and shipboard research provide key analogues. Maximizing scientific return further defines required staffing and analytical capabilities. Quantifying science and facilities staffing define a transition point regarding minimum skill-sets needed to maintain a safe, sustainably functioning facility. Thirty-five people are needed whereby scientific specialization approaches an optimum. Engineering specialists would remain multi-disciplined and cross trained, given a two-to-one science to facilities staff ratio. Limited initial in situ resource development projections given minimum 8–12 month cycles for logistics and staffing.

Hibbitts C. A.

The Lunar Volatile Imager for the Poles (VIP) Mapping Natural and Anthropogenic Polar Surface Volatiles at Artemis Base Camp [#5043]
The Lunar Volatile Imager for the Poles (VIP) would map the accumulation of naturally occurring and anthropogenic water, organics, CO2, SO2, and possibly other volatiles on the lunar surface in the vicinity of the Artemis base camp. VIP is a variant of the MIMSI camera concept leveraging a different filter selection covering the 2.5–6.5 μm spectral range and a gimbal to enable a full 360o survey. The Lunar VIP would map trace abundances and investigate their possible active accumulation by observing changes over time in the vicinity of Artemis Base Camp in pristine regolith and in ‘fresh’ regolith exposed by human activity with the goal of discerning natural and anthropogenic processes. If placed in the vicinity of a PSR, VIP can map cold-trapped surface volatiles and hypervolatiles, over time, to improve our understanding of the volatile history of the Moon and to investigate possible anthropogenic influence on the PSR.

Narayanaswamy N.   Persad A. H.   Ward C. A.

Experiments of Water Adsorption onto Lunar Simulant Modeled Using the Zeta Adsorption Isotherm [#5001]
Adsorption-desorption isotherms provide one way of characterizing the capacity of the lunar surface to store water. However, proper interpretation of adsorption isotherm data requires equilibrium measurements and a physically accurate adsorption model. It is therefore surprising that many adsorption isotherm studies of the Apollo samples have not been performed under equilibrium conditions, were susceptible to transient chemisorption effects (such as hydroxylation), and relied on an isotherm model that had been known to lead to non-physical results (such as the prediction of infinite vapor adsorption at saturation conditions). Here, we use the Zeta Adsorption Isotherm (ZAI) model to characterize the adsorption of water onto JSC-1 lunar simulant performed in a dynamic vapor sorption chamber for over 4 months. The experiments reveal a picture of water-regolith interaction different from that typically reported in the literature, with implications for water ISRU technologies.

Lolachi R.   Stubbs T. J.   Glenar D. A.   Kolokolova L.

Optical Monitoring of the Dust Environment at Lunar Surface Exploration Sites [#5014]
Experience from the Apollo missions showed that dust has the potential to be hazardous as it can interfere with the operation of mechanical, thermal and optical systems. Monitoring the local dust environment during surface activities by measuring the overlying dust loading will be a priority for Artemis. An effective method is to measure the intensity of sunlight scattered by the dust. We present a precomputed grid of light scattering properties for irregularly shaped grains (Richard et al., 2011), which are a more realistic representation of lunar dust than the Mie models commonly employed. The grid spans UV to near-IR wave-lengths and encompasses a wide range of grain size. Scattering from smaller grains is computed using the Discrete Dipole (DDA) method (DDASCAT) and at larger sizes using the Hapke equivalent slab method, with diffraction superimposed. We find commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) camera hardware can be used as a dust monitor.

John K. K.   Garcia A. H.   Hobbs A. S.   Johansen M. R.   Hill J. J.   Brown G. J.

Mitigating Dust to Enable Long-Term Exploration [#5051]
Mitigating lunar dust is essential to successful science investigations and operations on the surface of the Moon.  Artemis will utilize an integrated dust mitigation strategy involving operational and architectural approaches, as well as passive and active technologies.  Dust mitigation is especially important when considering sustained operations and human presence on the lunar surface. Lunar dust does not know boundaries.  As various elements of the Artemis architecture interact with the surface, lunar dust may be transferred between different assets, making it critical for a cross-program dust mitigation approach.  NASA engineers and scientists are coordinating across various programs, projects, and vendors to ensure dust does not hinder the objectives of different missions and systems.  Managing lunar dust involves tolerating dust exposure, detecting or monitoring dust, controlling the entry of dust into various assets, and removing dust.

Schubert P. J.

Density Sorting of Regolith as ISRU Precursor [#5004]
An early step in the beneficiation of regolith minerals is sorting by density. Crushing and sieving are needed to get a reasonably uniform particle size, our starting point. Next, target grains sift off a platform to fall. A stream of bullet beads, flying laterally out of a chute (into which they were dropped), is directed at the fall. Momentum is transferred to the grains, which are bounced in a lateral distribution, whereby lower-density particles generally travel farthest. Target grains and bullet beads are collected in bins. Bullet particles are separated (magnet or eddy or float) and reused. A cascade, or repeat, of this process will concentrate specific minerals. This precursor step is helpful to several important processes in ISRU (in situ resource utilization). Calculations from a preliminary design will be presented. A case study is made of the concentration of thorium-bearing minerals. During fall semester 2020, a student team will build and test a prototype.

Bensi M. T.   Banks M. E.   Schleicher L. S.   Schmerr N. C.   Watters T. R.   Weber R. C.

Constructing a Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis to Assess Potential Hazards to an Artemis Base Camp:  Opportunities and Challenges [#5050]
As NASA and other organizations look to the Moon, it is important to understand hazards for structures and instruments that will perform scientific missions and support astronaut safety. Probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) has been widely adopted to assess the frequency and severity of ground motion (GM) on Earth and inform engineering decisions. In this work, we integrate data from:  (1) Apollo seismic stations, which recorded GM data from 28 shallow moonquakes, (2) Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) and mapping efforts, which provide new insights regarding fault locations and surface geometry, (3) high-fidelity numerical models, which can generate lunar seismic GM scenario shakemaps, and (4) characterizations of shear wave velocities. These data now collectively offer the components for a preliminary PSHA for the Moon. We detail our progress, challenges, and describe insights relevant to hazard characterization and knowledge gaps potentially addressable by future missions.

Phipps P. H.   Stubbs T. J.   Looper M. D.   Spence H. E.

Variations in Radiation Exposure Near a Simple Lunar Crater [#5035]
The Moon has a harsh radiation environment that poses significant challenges to future science and exploration activities. Exposure hazards from space radiation are primarily due to galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) and solar energetic particles (SEPs) that are incident at the lunar surface from all directions. The level of exposure at a given location on the Moon is dependent on the amount of space radiation incident from above the local horizon. Here we consider the radiation exposure around simple lunar craters that are representative of the types of landforms that will be encountered by future landed missions. We use Geant4 Monte Carlo simulations to compute the dose response for spherical targets composed of water and silicon, as proxies for biological and electronic systems respectively, within aluminum shells. These are important considerations when selecting sites for permanent habitats, as well as for choosing routes and for contingency planning during surface operations.

Garcia C. G.   Osborne L. O.   Barnes D. B.

Simple Robotic Sample Return Vehicle [#5009]
CLPS missions provide exciting access to the far reaches of the lunar surface on a semi-regular basis, however mass and technology constraints limit the investigations that can be carried out in-situ. By leveraging additive manufacturing and ultra-low temperature propellants a highly integrated, low mass, return vehicle can be added to CLPS missions as a ‘containerized’ payload to provide an exponential multiplier to the science that can be accomplished on CLPS missions. Developed under a Phase I SBIR, with TRL 4 propulsion systems, the vehicle consists of a single printed component which includes the tanks, fluid lines, propulsion system, and structural interfaces. A ballistic return capsule is attached to the top of this component with provisions robotic manipulators to install sample canisters. The reference mission can return 130g of sample material from the lunar south pole with only 20kg of payload allocation on the vehicle.

 

Wednesday, September 16, 2020

THE VALUE OF SCIENCE AT THE ARTEMIS BASE CAMP

2:05 p.m.

Chairs:  Lisa Gaddis and Renee Weber

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Times

Authors (*Denotes Presenter)

Abstract Title and Summary

2:05 p.m.

Papitashvili V. O. 

Science at Earth’s South Pole Station — What is Good to Know Planning Science that Can be Achieved at Lunar South Pole

2:20 p.m.

Head J. W. *   Schmitt H. H.   Borg L. E.   Fassett C. I.   Jolliff B. L.   Neal C. R.   Pieters C. M.   Shearer C. K.

Scientific Objectives at an Artemis Base Camp (Non-Volatile Related) and Implementation Tools [#5038]
The initial Artemis landings and Base Camp near the South Pole offer key opportunities to address fundamental lunar & planetary science questions that can be studied by careful human and robotic exploration and return of targeted samples, selected and documented for analysis in Earth laboratories. Primary ongoing issues include: Crustal Provinces:  FHT, PKT, SPA; Outside Apollo-Luna zone; nearside-farside (NS-FS) differences. Crustal Stratigraphy:  Layering, magma ocean lateral heterogeneity, mantle access. Magmatism:  NS-FS mare basalts, pyroclastics, KREEP, silica-rich, Mg-suite. Magnetism:  Field history, magnitude. Chronology and Flux:  Basins (e.g., SPA, Schrodinger, Orientale, Mendel-Rydberg, Procellarum (?)); Craters and cold-traps (e.g., Shackleton, Cabeus, Haworth, Faustini, Shoemaker). Critical to addressing these questions would be an Apollo-like rake with adjustable tines to gather thousands of grape-walnut-apple-sized regional rock samples to complement local boulder context.

2:35 p.m.

Denevi B. W. *   Robinson M. S.

Key Science Investigations of the Moon’s Polar Regolith [#5019]
Understanding the unique history of the Moon’s south polar region, as well as larger questions about space weathering, regolith mixing, and sample provenance, all benefit from detailed characterization of the regolith. For space weathering, the polar location will allow for sampling of regolith weathered in a region of reduced solar wind flux, and analysis of those samples will reveal how the development of nanophase iron and agglutinates differs in this environment. Examining the basaltic and SPA-Terrane components of the regolith in this remote highlands location will provide new information on the distal transport of material by impacts. Coring and trenching will enable a look at the layering within the regolith due to individual impact events; coupled with GPR, a greater regional stratigraphy will emerge along with new knowledge of highland regolith depth and structure. A polar landing site within a ray from Tycho would provide additional tests of key Solar System processes.

2:50 p.m.

Hayne P. O. *   Aharonson O.   Schorghofer N.   Paige D. A.   Powell T. M.   Rubanenko L.

Micro Cold Traps and Volatile Source Rates at the Artemis Base Camp [#5032]
Volatiles are critically important for understanding the evolution of the Earth-Moon system and the space environment, as well as for in-situ resource utilization. However, little is known about the past or present sources and supply rates of volatiles. We propose an experiment to constrain volatile sequestration rates and possible sources using measurements of temperature and water content within cold traps of various sizes at the Artemis Base Camp. In this investigation, trends of water content with decreasing spatial scale would be analyzed, leveraging two facts:  1) smaller cold traps are younger (due to meteoritic impact gardening), and 2) there is a minimum cold trap size. Based on (1), we can look for a minimum size of cold trap where water ice exists, while testing thermal models based on (2). In order to do so, astronauts would carry thermal IR cameras to rapidly map temperatures, identifying cold traps and collecting cryogenic samples for later analysis of water content.

3:05 p.m.

Jolliff B. *

The Importance of Sample Return from the Artemis Base Camp

3:20 p.m.

 

BREAK

3:35 p.m.

Panning M. P. *   Weber R. C.   Kedar S.   Bugby D.   Calcutt S.   Currie D.   Elliott J.   Grimm R.   He Y.   Kawamura T.   Lognonné P.   Nagihara S.   Neal C.   Nunn C.   Pike W. T.   Standley I.   Walsh W.

Building a Lunar Network Using a Flexible, Long-Lived Lunar Geophysical Package (LGP) [#5006]
The Lunar Geophysical Package (LGP) is a long-lived surface package deployable by astronauts or commercial landers, combining seismic, electromagnetic, heat flow and laser ranging measurements. The LGP would be capable of networking with other geophysical packages delivered by astronauts and landers.

LGP will address key questions about the lunar interior by constraining the current seismic state and internal structure of the Moon, measuring its heat flow, installing a next-generation laser ranging capability, and measuring the electrical conductivity of the lunar interior. The lunar science community recognizes that a geophysical network is required to fully address these objectives, prioritizing a Lunar Geophysical Network (LGN) as a New Frontiers Mission. The LGP, a long-lived node with multiple geophysical instruments, can begin reaching science goals in advance and together with a New Frontiers-level LGN by progressively building a network of nodes with overlapping lifetimes.

3:50 p.m.

Burns J. O. *

Roadmap to Low Radio Frequency Observations from the Moon

4:10 p.m.

Petro N. E. *

LRO Data:  Designing a Base Camp in the World of LRO’s View of the Moon [#5034]
The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) has been orbiting the Moon for 11 years, generating over 1.2 petabytes of data and transforming our view of the Moon. LRO’s orbit over that decade-plus has allowed us to focus on the South Pole, providing a unique perspective of the target for future human exploration. But what to make of all this data? Between high-resolution images, topography, radar measurements, compositional data, and insight into the lunar environment there is a nearly limitless number of ways to attack the question of where to go and what to do once we’re there. So, let’s attack the question of what to do and where to go with the best-characterized dataset of any planet. I will walk through what we have in the PDS, how it can be used to quickly characterize potential targets for such a Base Camp, and how as a community we can begin targeting future exploration.

4:25 p.m.

 

Community Discussion Time

5:10 p.m.

Fagan A. L. *

Closing Remarks and Initial Draft Findings